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Thread: Be careful on your "Wal-Mart Walk"

  1. #1
    Regular Member Red Dawg's Avatar
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    Be careful on your "Wal-Mart Walk"

    Smile for the day: http://www.kpho.com/story/16978166/g...oom?hpt=us_bn7

    In Mesa, a man was inside a Walmart bathroom when a bullet struck just a few feet from the urinal where he was standing.

    "Last thing that you'd expect is for a gunshot to go off, go right through the stall door while you're doing your business if you will," said Sgt. Ed Wessing from the Mesa Police Department.

    That man was standing at the urinal when police say 24-year-old Andrew Seals entered a stall wearing a western-style holster and .357-caliber antique revolver.

    Before he could sit down, he had an accident.

    "He took the belt off as he was going to use the restroom and it dropped on the floor, and the motion of it hitting the floor caused that weapon to discharge. When you're in a closed environment like that, it's extremely loud and extremely startling," Wessing said.

    Just one more thing to add to your required checks when doing your first carry, a Wal-Mart walk. Right after eating your Doritos, and before buying your ammo. Maybe buy a good retention holster before your "walk"..

    Scott
    The Second Amendment is in place
    in case the politicians ignore the others

    A gun in the hand is better than a cop on the phone

  2. #2
    Regular Member Chad Paulson's Avatar
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    I heard about this earlier, people need to secure their weapons. The Libs are going to run wild with this.

    Sent from my Evo 4G

  3. #3
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Most (all?) modern handguns are drop proof. He needs so acquire one.
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training.” Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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    If the guy had been carrying that antique revolver on an empty chamber this wouldn't be an issue even if he did drop it. Know your gun and be aware that if it has nothing built in to prevent a discharge if the thing is dropped then use your head when handling it or carrying it to begin with.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grapeshot View Post
    Most (all?) modern handguns are drop proof. He needs so acquire one.
    Yup. I accidentally dropped my whole belt with holster and spare magazine holder on the restroom floor at a Gander Mountain recently when I unbuckled the belt. I forgot that the motorcycle pants I had on didn't have belt loops and it all just fell right off. Fortunately I had the good sense to carry a gun that has the parts to prevent that fall from resulting in a tragedy. Although there was a nice thud on the floor, that was the end of it.
    Last edited by jmelvin; 02-22-2012 at 12:02 PM.

  6. #6
    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    We are still waiting to find out if t was a Ruger with or without the transfer bar safety. Presence of that feature will determine if there is reason to believe the gun malfunctioned or if the owner/operator did.

    In the meantime, remember Rule #5: Maintain Control of Your Firearm at All Times. Dropping it - out of the holster, or having your whole belt/rig obey the command of gravity - is not acceptable when pass/fail carries so great a penalty. (and yes, I know there are only two groups in this issue: those who have lost control and those that will. The best we can hope for is to remain in the first category for as long as possible, and then be following as many of the other Four Rules as possible when we move into the other camp.)

    stay safe.
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

    Because stupidity isn't a race, and everybody can win.

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    Regular Member GreatDaneMan's Avatar
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    I have dropped my striker fired PT145 a few times...Never outside the house. He needs to get with the program. I bought a striker fired pistol for my first gun specifically because of its modern design and I knew I was going to drop it. Sure enough.. Its drop resistant.

    When we were at the VCDL/OCDO lobby day breakfast, I was in the restroom washing my face and I hear CLUNK click from the stall. Me and another guy turn around, I said I know that sound! At least we know its drop tested now. I think the guy beside me said "FUMBLE!"

    Do not know who you are, but thank you for having a safe pistol and humoring us.
    Mud Blood and Oil with a great dane along for the ride!

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    All the more reason restrooms should have a small shelf for a sidearm in the toilet stalls.

    Why not? Government can force a business to spend tens of thousands for access for handicapped as a discrimination (civil rights) issue. Why not an enumerated right such as bearing arms?*


    *Rhetorical device. I do not in any way advocate using the coercive power of government to force private businesses to install gun shelves. Shelves need to be encouraged by other means.
    Last edited by Citizen; 02-23-2012 at 01:11 AM.

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    Regular Member GreatDaneMan's Avatar
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    I just got a huge, huge idea. Thank you, Citizen!!

    Edit- 3 minutes later. Idea came crashing down to failure. Oh well, easy come easy go.


    I had thought of some sort of holster hanger that clips over stall. But this would only be carried in purses, narrowing the market down, and only to those with holsters that are easily removable...so slim to none. Or a portable hook to hang the trigger guard, but the chances of ND/AD would be huge for many. So that idea is in the can. I read up about people hanging their guns on coat hooks in the bathroom, and shooting the ceiling. Fail.
    Last edited by GreatDaneMan; 02-23-2012 at 01:07 AM.
    Mud Blood and Oil with a great dane along for the ride!

  10. #10
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Best place IMO for a handgun for either sex when seated in a restroom stall is in the crotch of your underwear.

    Guaranteed that you will NOT forget your gun - just do not forget to remove same before pulling then back up.

    Never put handgun on the lid of a commode - that puts it out of sight behind you where it may (some have been) forgotten.
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training.” Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  11. #11
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    I've found that the handrails provided in some stalls have just enough clearance for me to stuff my gun down between the rail and the wall, while the retention piece on the top of the holster sticks out enough to hold the assembly in place. This also allows for my gun to be pointed in a safe direction (at the floor) while it's not on my hip. In some places you have to get really creative since there is little to work with.

  12. #12
    Regular Member paramedic's Avatar
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    I love it when there is a baby changing station in the stall, not just out in the main part of the restroom. Also alot of public restrooms have the double TP holder, I have used that alot.

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    Regular Member The Wolfhound's Avatar
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    Seem odd to anyone else....

    I have handled and read about many firearms, modern and antique, I have not run across an antique in .357. .38 yes (yes I know that .38 Special, et.al. is really a .357 but it is not "named" by that number), .356 yes(some old black powder revolvers). .357 is in my limited experience only available in modern firearms chambered for .357Magnum and .357Sigg. More data is clearly needed.
    Last edited by The Wolfhound; 02-23-2012 at 05:42 PM.

  14. #14
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    Could've been an Uberti Cattleman 1873 style in .357 magnum. When in AZ I'd occasionally see folks carrying Uberti revolvers.
    Last edited by jmelvin; 02-23-2012 at 06:59 PM.

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    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wolfhound View Post
    I have handled and read about many firearms, modern and antique, I have not run across an antique in .357. .38 yes (yes I know that .38 Special, et.al. is really a .357 but it is not "named" by that number), .356 yes(some old black powder revolvers). .357 is in my limited experience only available in modern firearms chambered for .357Magnum and .357Sigg. More data is clearly needed.
    I've seen a few shot out .38 S&W's that .357's can fit in. I have one I may give to someone I don't like.

  16. #16
    Regular Member Marco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wolfhound View Post
    I have not run across an antique in .357. .
    .357 is in my limited experience only available in modern firearms chambered for .357Magnum.
    2nd Gen Colt SAA
    Uberti Cattle man SAA
    Ruger Flat top and 3 screw BH
    Hawes J.P/Sohns SAA


    Just to name a few.
    The above all SAA, all without a transfer bar safety (not drop proof [?] )

    And Coonan Model, A, B and Cadet all based on Series 70 Colt 1911


    Edit:
    I'm taken they mean antique looking not antique as in collectible/really old.

    .357 mag has been around since 1935.
    Last edited by Marco; 02-24-2012 at 09:23 AM. Reason: see above
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    Regular Member 45acpForMe's Avatar
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    How old is an Antique

    When I got married my wife told me that she was going to bring over her Grandmothers antique lamp to our/my house. When it got here I laughed and said it looked like it was made in 1970 not an antique. In my opinion an antique was something close to 100 years old. She showed me online where furntiture is considered antique after 25 years old. So technically she was right but my opinion didn't change.

    Cars too can get antique plates after a certain year/time which I have seen 1960's cars with antique plates.

    So what is your definition of "antique" and how does that line up with the firearm industries definition, compared to a reporter that may or may not be knowledgeable about guns?

    According to my ex-wife, some of my clothes are antiques too. :-)

  18. #18
    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 45acpForMe View Post
    When I got married my wife told me that she was going to bring over her Grandmothers antique lamp to our/my house. When it got here I laughed and said it looked like it was made in 1970 not an antique. In my opinion an antique was something close to 100 years old. She showed me online where furntiture is considered antique after 25 years old. So technically she was right but my opinion didn't change.

    Cars too can get antique plates after a certain year/time which I have seen 1960's cars with antique plates.

    So what is your definition of "antique" and how does that line up with the firearm industries definition, compared to a reporter that may or may not be knowledgeable about guns?

    According to my ex-wife, some of my clothes are antiques too. :-)
    I like old guns but there is no real Antique period.

    I have a few of mine on OVN's "Country shop section.
    http://news.oldva.org/?page_id=2962



    This is one I rebuilt the locks on.
    http://news.oldva.org/?page_id=2120



    And the old Columbia
    http://news.oldva.org/?page_id=2216


  19. #19
    Regular Member Ironside's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 45acpForMe View Post
    When I got married my wife told me that she was going to bring over her Grandmothers antique lamp to our/my house. When it got here I laughed and said it looked like it was made in 1970 not an antique. In my opinion an antique was something close to 100 years old. She showed me online where furntiture is considered antique after 25 years old. So technically she was right but my opinion didn't change.

    Cars too can get antique plates after a certain year/time which I have seen 1960's cars with antique plates.

    So what is your definition of "antique" and how does that line up with the firearm industries definition, compared to a reporter that may or may not be knowledgeable about guns?

    According to my ex-wife, some of my clothes are antiques too. :-)
    In Florida we have a definition of antique;

    790.001 Definitions.—As used in this chapter, except where the context
    otherwise requires:
    (1) “Antique firearm” means any firearm manufactured in or before 1918
    (including any matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar early type of
    ignition system) or replica thereof, whether actually manufactured before or
    after the year 1918,

    and also any firearm using fixed ammunition
    manufactured in or before 1918, for which ammunition is no longer
    manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary
    channels of commercial trade.
    When those in Government fail to see the danger in too much Government, they become the danger.
    (Original quote by me)

    If we lose the Second Amendment it is only a matter of time before we lose the First Amendment, then the Fourth Amendment and then it is all downhill from there ...

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  20. #20
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironside View Post
    In Florida we have a definition of antique;

    790.001 Definitions.—As used in this chapter, except where the context
    otherwise requires:
    (1) “Antique firearm” means any firearm manufactured in or before 1918
    (including any matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar early type of
    ignition system) or replica thereof, whether actually manufactured before or
    after the year 1918,

    and also any firearm using fixed ammunition
    manufactured in or before 1918, for which ammunition is no longer
    manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary
    channels of commercial trade.
    Seen that before and I admit I'm fascinated by the disconnect, that doesn't compute, factor.

    Anitique, as in old, before 1918 OR somthing newer that looks and functions like it. In most circles the latter would be a fake, a rip off. Of course the point here is to define an exception not the more narrow generally accepted definition of an antique.

    Still we end up with "antiques" being manufactured in 2012. Seems to be they could have found a better word.
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training.” Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  21. #21
    Regular Member The Wolfhound's Avatar
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    Got to get me one o' them "Brand New Antiques".

  22. #22
    Campaign Veteran roscoe13's Avatar
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    Would that be ONS (Old New Stock) ?

    Roscoe
    "The very atmosphere of firearms anywhere and everywhere restrains evil interference - they deserve a place of honor with all that's good." - George Washington

  23. #23
    Regular Member 45acpForMe's Avatar
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    I heard of a furniture shop sign, "Antiques manufactured while you wait"

    Next thing there will be drive throughs for them too. :-)

  24. #24
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Sign on long gone store that was on Rt. 17 in Gloucester County:

    We Buy Junk - Sell Antiques
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training.” Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  25. #25
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    Grapeshot it sounds as if Florida considers "antique" both firearms and firearm design such that even a component (the firearm) built using the antiquated design requirements or with antiquated design function meet the definition of an antique. I could see the usefulness of this particular methodology, especially if you have a clever legislator who knows that modern firearms are banned somewhere and he doesn't have the political capital at that moment to get the restriction on modern arms lifted. By defining antique arms to include even arms that are made today, but to an antiquated design then you have a way around that restriction for people carrying antique arms if your clever methodology is not spotted first.
    Last edited by jmelvin; 02-24-2012 at 03:46 PM.

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