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Thread: Almost Shot a Copper Head Snake Today.

  1. #1
    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    Almost Shot a Copper Head Snake Today.

    It was a warm day and I figured I would go down to the river and go fishing.

    Turned out a lot of other people planned the same thing and a lot of the fishing spots were taken.
    I figured I would walk along the bank up a mile or two and get away from all of them.

    While walking along the rocky bank, I started to slip and loose my foothold a few times.
    (In some places a long the bank its like a cliff face and water)


    As I grabbed a tree root for stability I noticed a bright copper colored snake come out from under a large rack crevice and splash into the water.

    Keep in mind I really had no place else to go, so splosh Im in waist deep water with a god damn venomous pit viper three feet in front of me.

    I was OCing my Sig 229 on my hip, and I swiftly drawed from under the water and slowly lifted my pistol out of the water muzzle down while holding my fishing rod in front of me.

    Thankfully he just stuck his tongue out at my (sniffing me) and swam away and onto the other side of the river.

    I have to tell you by the time I got to the other side of the rock face, and flopped down I was about to pass out from the pure adrenaline rush.

    I re holstered my Sig and was about to smoke a cigarette, then realizing they were soaked along with my cell phone and wallet.


    I realize shooting a snake in water is probably extremely difficult, but hell thats all I could think of and to be honest it just seemed like it was an automatic reaction to unholoster my weapon in that circumstance.
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

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    It's good you've trained yourself to draw instinctively.

    Would your gun have still worked after being submerged?

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    Regular Member OC for ME's Avatar
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    Carry a BUG, .22 mag with snake shot.

    http://northamericanarms.com/firearm...orted/m-p.html
    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson.

    "Better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer" - English jurist William Blackstone.
    It is AFAIK original to me. Compromise is failure on the installment plan, particularly when dealing with so intractable an opponent as ignorance. - Nightmare

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    Would your gun have still worked after being submerged?
    Why wouldn't it? It's only wet not broken.

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    Some guns work when wet, others don't.

    I was merely asking for edification purposes.

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    Activist Member SigGuy23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Some guns work when wet, others don't.

    I was merely asking for edification purposes.
    Sigs are designed to be combat handguns. You can shoot them in any environment. That's why the seals use the 226. They are underwater all the time on missions.

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    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC for ME View Post
    Carry a BUG, .22 mag with snake shot.

    http://northamericanarms.com/firearm...orted/m-p.html
    I was thinking about getting one of those. Maybe what happened down by the river was a sign.

    The main reason I OC my .40 Sig while fishing is not so much for small critters, but the big ones (think Deliverance).

    Some of the locals along the southern Monongahela and Youghiogheny Rivers are really scary.
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

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    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SigGuy23 View Post

    That's why the seals use the 226.
    And the British SAS!

    On a side note, I remember doing tactical shooting drills in a foot of snow and stumbled while advancing towards the next barrier.

    When I got up the barrel was packed with snow and the Sig fired fine.
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by SigGuy23 View Post
    Sigs are designed to be combat handguns. You can shoot them in any environment. That's why the seals use the 226. They are underwater all the time on missions.
    And now I know that. Thanks!

  10. #10
    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    And now I know that. Thanks!
    Now you need to get your ATM card out and buy one! lol
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

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    Activist Member SigGuy23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    And now I know that. Thanks!
    You're welcome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sig229 View Post
    Now you need to get your ATM card out and buy one! lol
    lol, my first gun was the Sig P250. Kinda turned me off of Sig, but now I carry my husband's P238, and it's winning me over

  13. #13
    Activist Member carsontech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sig229 View Post
    The main reason I OC my .40 Sig while fishing is not so much for small critters, but the big ones (think Deliverance).

    Some of the locals along the southern Monongahela and Youghiogheny Rivers are really scary.
    "He got a real pretty mouth ain't he?"


    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    lol, my first gun was the Sig P250. Kinda turned me off of Sig, but now I carry my husband's P238, and it's winning me over
    I thought you liked my 220, as well?

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    Those snakes are no joke. If they get the drop on you, and strike you can easily be a goner.
    Get tons of Cottonmouths and Rattlesnake out here, so I keep a .410 loaded with #6 shot handy whenever Im out and bout around the house.
    Not sure how well I'd do trying to hit one with a pistol round- even my .45- as they can be hard to hit, sometimes, even with .410 , when they are moving quickly.
    The .22 snake-load might be a good idea for such situations as you were in. Handier than a .410., for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by carsontech View Post

    I thought you like my 220, as well?
    I did, but I only shot it once. I like to shoot more then one mag before going all Nutn Fancy on it

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    Regular Member Jack House's Avatar
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    <3 the P226, wanna buy one eventually. But there are so many others and not enough money.

    Sent from my SPH-D700 using Tapatalk 2

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    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j4l View Post
    Those snakes are no joke. If they get the drop on you, and strike you can easily be a goner.

    Simply untrue.

    Unless you are a small child, or someone with a serious heart or circulatory condition, copperhead bites from a mature snake are RARELY fatal in the US. They can hurt. They might get infected. They can cause flu-like symptoms, high fever, cramping and localized numbness, but they rarely are fatal. I you can get to a hospital with a few hours, you'll probably be OK.

    You are more likely to die from being stung by bees or wasps than from a copperhead bite.

    Baby copperheads are, however, MUCH more venomous than adult ones, and their bites can be life-threatening, especially if you get bit by several at the same time...
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamer View Post
    Simply untrue.

    Unless you are a small child, or someone with a serious heart or circulatory condition, copperhead bites from a mature snake are RARELY fatal in the US. They can hurt. They might get infected. They can cause flu-like symptoms, high fever, cramping and localized numbness, but they rarely are fatal. I you can get to a hospital with a few hours, you'll probably be OK.

    You are more likely to die from being stung by bees or wasps than from a copperhead bite.

    Baby copperheads are, however, MUCH more venomous than adult ones, and their bites can be life-threatening, especially if you get bit by several at the same time...
    Then I stand corrected.
    Sig, in future encounters with such creatures, be sure to establish it's age, before deciding whether to return fire or flee...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamer View Post
    Baby copperheads are, however, MUCH more venomous than adult ones, and their bites can be life-threatening, especially if you get bit by several at the same time...
    Actually...

    Myth 8) Baby Venomous Snakes Are More Dangerous Than Adults.

    This myth is roughly two-thirds nonsense and one-third truth. I believe this myth was born out of the human fascination with irony. For some reason we like to think it’s the one we don’t see coming that always gets us. We like to root for the underdog, and we simply like the notion of the tiny one being the deadly one.

    But the fact of the matter is that baby venomous snakes are not more venomous than their parents. In fact, quite the opposite is true in a great many snake species; adults have far more virulent venom than the young snakes. For example, both adult and juvenile timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) have venom that is “strongly hemolytic,” which means it causes the breakdown of red blood cells, in prey (Ernst 116). Yet venom studies in older adults demonstrate that the “activity level of some venom enzymes tends to increase with the size and age of the snake” (Ernst 116). So an older timber rattlesnake has venom more virulent than a younger one.

    Similarly, an adult snake is capable of delivering a much larger venom dose than a smaller snake. Consider the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus). Juveniles of the species typically deliver less than 70 milligrams of venom, whereas a healthy adult specimen may deliver 492 to 666 milligrams of venom (Ernst 90). The known maximum is 848 milligrams in a single bite (Ernst 90). Roughly 100 milligrams of venom is considered a lethal dose for an adult human.

    So if the venom toxicity of a young snake is not as potent as an adult, and the total venom yield of a juvenile is not nearly as great as an adult’s, what part of this myth is one-third true? The answer lies in the venomous snake’s experience level. Adults are veterans of life. They have successfully avoided or driven back predators and attackers, and they have full control over all muscular functions. Adults recognize the need to conserve their precious venom. It takes time to produce it, and a snake that empties its venom reserves in an attacker has nothing left to subdue prey. They have learned that a venomous snake without venom doesn’t eat.

    It’s a different story for neonate venomous snakes. They generally are not as in control of their muscular functions as are adult snakes, and they are at their most vulnerable point in life. Defensive strikes are fast and thorough. When these snakes bite, they typically bite hard, pumping the attacker full of every last bit of venom. If a young venomous snake’s bite were to be more dangerous than an adult’s, this would be the only way.
    Also, factor in that the adult snake has longer fangs with larger hollow spaces allowing for deeper penetration and more venom flow, and generally have greater accuracy.
    Last edited by PistolPackingMomma; 04-21-2012 at 04:49 PM.

  20. #20
    Activist Member carsontech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PistolPackingMomma View Post
    Actually...

    Also, factor in that the adult snake has longer fangs with larger hollow spaces allowing for deeper penetration and more venom flow, and generally have greater accuracy.
    I knew you were going to do that. You can't pass up informing people about them there snakes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by carsontech View Post
    I knew you were going to do that. You can't pass up informing people about them there snakes.
    And, higher velocity, and ME ratings, with reduced chance of over-penetrating..



    lol. classic.

  22. #22
    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    I really dont want to get bit by any snake. In the grasslands of Colorado & Wyoming I almost got bit by a Mohave rattlesnake.

    Here's a couple of pics I took of it:

    Last edited by Sig229; 04-21-2012 at 05:25 PM.
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by carsontech View Post
    I knew you were going to do that. You can't pass up informing people about them there snakes.
    Don't tread on me
    Last edited by PistolPackingMomma; 04-21-2012 at 06:56 PM.

  24. #24
    Regular Member ()pen(arry's Avatar
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    I spent some years dealing in venomous reptiles, and as someone who doesn't do anything without knowing plenty about it in advance, as an amateur herpetologist.

    Snakes are ambush predators. They derive their ability to take prey and defend against predators from their ability to hide and surprise, a huge component of which is their ability to strike from distance. All snakes can swim, and some are comfortable in water.

    However, terrestrial snakes cannot strike effectively while swimming. The few terrestrial snakes that hunt fish do so like hand-fishers. Snakes can't coil and launch in the water. Thus, terrestrial snakes use water as a means of travel or escape, but always insecurely. Copperheads are known to swim frequently, and therefore there are numerous recorded incidents of copperhead bites in the water. However, a copperhead will never demonstrate aggression in the water, even defensively. If it is swimming toward you, it is only because it does not know you're there, or recognize that you're animate. The most effective defense against a water-borne snake in the US (we have no naturally aquatic snakes) is to splash water at it and swim away. Not kidding.

    Having said all that, I begrudge no one without this knowledge the self defense they see fit. I hate to see an animal needlessly harmed, so education is always best, but in the circumstances given, I find no fault. I would hope, however, that such an incident would trigger investigation and understanding.

  25. #25
    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ()pen(arry View Post
    I spent some years dealing in venomous reptiles, and as someone who doesn't do anything without knowing plenty about it in advance, as an amateur herpetologist.

    Snakes are ambush predators. They derive their ability to take prey and defend against predators from their ability to hide and surprise, a huge component of which is their ability to strike from distance. All snakes can swim, and some are comfortable in water.

    However, terrestrial snakes cannot strike effectively while swimming. The few terrestrial snakes that hunt fish do so like hand-fishers. Snakes can't coil and launch in the water. Thus, terrestrial snakes use water as a means of travel or escape, but always insecurely. Copperheads are known to swim frequently, and therefore there are numerous recorded incidents of copperhead bites in the water. However, a copperhead will never demonstrate aggression in the water, even defensively. If it is swimming toward you, it is only because it does not know you're there, or recognize that you're animate. The most effective defense against a water-borne snake in the US (we have no naturally aquatic snakes) is to splash water at it and swim away. Not kidding.

    Having said all that, I begrudge no one without this knowledge the self defense they see fit. I hate to see an animal needlessly harmed, so education is always best, but in the circumstances given, I find no fault. I would hope, however, that such an incident would trigger investigation and understanding.
    I appreciate your well thought out post and agree.
    I didnt want to shoot the Copperhead, and glad I didnt have to. The same goes for the Rattlesnake I posted pics of a few posts above this one.

    I understand when Im out in the wilderness, I am in they're territory and Im the "intruder".

    On the other hand, if a spider crawles on me, Im emptying mags! (just kidding)
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

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