Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27

Thread: First Handgun - Glock 17

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Longmont, Colorado
    Posts
    7

    First Handgun - Glock 17

    Howdy folks, I've recently turned 18 and being interested in firearms since I was young, I'm considering the idea of purchasing my first handgun primarily to learn about firearm safety, how to shoot etc. and for personal defense. I want to start learning at such a young age so when I'm older I can be an inspiration to my kids that we live in a country who's citizens have rights to own firearms etc.

    FYI: I'm aware I need to be 21 to buy from a dealer, I have that "issue" so to speak covered though.

    Anyway, I'm strongly considering the Glock 17, a 9mm full size firearm. I intend to purchase the .22lr conversion kit to make my frequent sessions to the firing range more cost efficient. However in open carrying and concealed storage in my house or car, I plan to use the standard 9mm setup.

    Having never been extensively around guns before, I have hundreds of questions. I think I understand the laws both federal and state (colorado). However..

    What's recommended for first time buyer/user? (ie. one-on-one with an NRA member/instructor? beginner's class?)
    What sort of "gear" will I need?
    Is it as hard as it looks to clean firearms?
    Any written guides to etiquette on the range, and in the gun store?
    Any other general information?

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Texas and Missouri
    Posts
    6
    Zach,

    Since your 18 and I am 70 I'll give you some thoughts from a old person. I am not from Colorado but I understand OC is legal there in some places. Please correct me if I am wrong, but to open carry you have to be able to own a gun legally. I think you have to be 21 as you mention.

    So getting a gun while under age, and then open carrying, how wrong can that be?

    Now, about the G17. I love mine, works as advertized. Reliable with any ammo, has never failed to fire.

    The rest of your questions can be answered by your local gun store.

    Jim
    Texas CCL

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    KC
    Posts
    871
    Classes are definitely recommended, one on one or classroom would depend on your learning style as well as what you can afford.

    At a minimum, you will want a holster, eye protection, ear protection, and cleaning supplies. For a Glock, you can use the provided brush, and some cleaner like Breakfree CLE or Hoppes.

    Glocks field strip into 4 pieces, all of them are easy to clean. My 6 yo can reassemble it. Other handguns can be harder.

    Under federal law, you have to be 21 to purchase a handgun from a FFL. You have to be 18 to purchase it in a private sale. There are no federal laws specifying a minimum age to carry, so there is no concern there. I can't speak to CO's statutes.

    I'm sure that there are written guides to etiquette, you can probably google that. But at the range the RSO (Range Safety Officer) will be happy to go over them with you. You should talk to the RSO anytime you visit a new range, just so you know the rules (unless they're posted.

    Learn the 4 rules of firearm safety well, as well as how to apply them: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Co...irearms_safety

    Quote Originally Posted by Zach C. Nelson View Post
    Howdy folks, I've recently turned 18 and being interested in firearms since I was young, I'm considering the idea of purchasing my first handgun primarily to learn about firearm safety, how to shoot etc. and for personal defense. I want to start learning at such a young age so when I'm older I can be an inspiration to my kids that we live in a country who's citizens have rights to own firearms etc.

    FYI: I'm aware I need to be 21 to buy from a dealer, I have that "issue" so to speak covered though.

    Anyway, I'm strongly considering the Glock 17, a 9mm full size firearm. I intend to purchase the .22lr conversion kit to make my frequent sessions to the firing range more cost efficient. However in open carrying and concealed storage in my house or car, I plan to use the standard 9mm setup.

    Having never been extensively around guns before, I have hundreds of questions. I think I understand the laws both federal and state (colorado). However..

    What's recommended for first time buyer/user? (ie. one-on-one with an NRA member/instructor? beginner's class?)
    What sort of "gear" will I need?
    Is it as hard as it looks to clean firearms?
    Any written guides to etiquette on the range, and in the gun store?
    Any other general information?

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    fl
    Posts
    1,848
    Quote Originally Posted by Zach C. Nelson View Post
    Howdy folks, I've recently turned 18 and being interested in firearms since I was young, I'm considering the idea of purchasing my first handgun primarily to learn about firearm safety, how to shoot etc. and for personal defense. I want to start learning at such a young age so when I'm older I can be an inspiration to my kids that we live in a country who's citizens have rights to own firearms etc.

    FYI: I'm aware I need to be 21 to buy from a dealer, I have that "issue" so to speak covered though.

    Anyway, I'm strongly considering the Glock 17, a 9mm full size firearm. I intend to purchase the .22lr conversion kit to make my frequent sessions to the firing range more cost efficient. However in open carrying and concealed storage in my house or car, I plan to use the standard 9mm setup.

    Having never been extensively around guns before, I have hundreds of questions. I think I understand the laws both federal and state (colorado). However..

    What's recommended for first time buyer/user? (ie. one-on-one with an NRA member/instructor? beginner's class?)
    What sort of "gear" will I need?
    Is it as hard as it looks to clean firearms?
    Any written guides to etiquette on the range, and in the gun store?
    Any other general information?

    Cant comment on the age issue, check with local Law on that one.

    As for the Glock- great pistol for beginners, or pros, depending on how well it handles for you, personally. (Some folks find the grip-frames a bit bulky/wide to hold onto well when firing). Easy enough to take apart for cleaning (except for those take-down bits being a wee bit awkward for some). Handle one 1st, if you havent already, and if a range will let you rent one to try one out, go for it. Make sure it's something that feels right in the hand, during firing, though.
    As for the caliber choice... I cannot, in good conscience, recommend 9mm or .40 for it if you intend to possibly use it as a defensive arm, except as a "last-ditch"/ "only thing on-hand" effort.
    Without re-igniting a caliber debate, there are other, better-suited combat rounds available in Glocks- (.357 Sig, .45 acp, 10mm). Yes, they cost a couple $$ more ammo-wise, but the price is worth the difference if the time ever comes in which you actually have to make use of it.
    ($15 for 15 rounds of "WTF!,why isnt this guy STOPPING" vs. $20 for 2 rounds of "whew, glad I made it through that..." can make all the difference.)

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Longmont, Colorado
    Posts
    7
    I couldn't find a way to multiquote on the forum, so replying to each one individually.

    Quote Originally Posted by jlb27537 View Post
    Zach,

    Since your 18 and I am 70 I'll give you some thoughts from a old person. I am not from Colorado but I understand OC is legal there in some places. Please correct me if I am wrong, but to open carry you have to be able to own a gun legally. I think you have to be 21 as you mention.

    So getting a gun while under age, and then open carrying, how wrong can that be?

    Now, about the G17. I love mine, works as advertized. Reliable with any ammo, has never failed to fire.

    The rest of your questions can be answered by your local gun store.

    Jim
    Texas CCL
    In Colorado, I can legally buy under 21 from a 3rd-party, which satisfies the "owning a gun legally to OC" requirement. Apart from Denver, I'm really glad I live in Colorado, the firearm laws here are very reasonable.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Longmont, Colorado
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by kcgunfan View Post
    Classes are definitely recommended, one on one or classroom would depend on your learning style as well as what you can afford.

    At a minimum, you will want a holster, eye protection, ear protection, and cleaning supplies. For a Glock, you can use the provided brush, and some cleaner like Breakfree CLE or Hoppes.

    Glocks field strip into 4 pieces, all of them are easy to clean. My 6 yo can reassemble it. Other handguns can be harder.

    Under federal law, you have to be 21 to purchase a handgun from a FFL. You have to be 18 to purchase it in a private sale. There are no federal laws specifying a minimum age to carry, so there is no concern there. I can't speak to CO's statutes.

    I'm sure that there are written guides to etiquette, you can probably google that. But at the range the RSO (Range Safety Officer) will be happy to go over them with you. You should talk to the RSO anytime you visit a new range, just so you know the rules (unless they're posted.

    Learn the 4 rules of firearm safety well, as well as how to apply them: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Co...irearms_safety
    Thanks for replying! I'm excited to hear the Glock is easy to clean. Being my first firearm, I pretty much want to become an expert at it and extend it's life as long as possible.

    Thanks for the links.

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Longmont, Colorado
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by j4l View Post
    Cant comment on the age issue, check with local Law on that one.

    As for the Glock- great pistol for beginners, or pros, depending on how well it handles for you, personally. (Some folks find the grip-frames a bit bulky/wide to hold onto well when firing). Easy enough to take apart for cleaning (except for those take-down bits being a wee bit awkward for some). Handle one 1st, if you havent already, and if a range will let you rent one to try one out, go for it. Make sure it's something that feels right in the hand, during firing, though.
    As for the caliber choice... I cannot, in good conscience, recommend 9mm or .40 for it if you intend to possibly use it as a defensive arm, except as a "last-ditch"/ "only thing on-hand" effort.
    Without re-igniting a caliber debate, there are other, better-suited combat rounds available in Glocks- (.357 Sig, .45 acp, 10mm). Yes, they cost a couple $$ more ammo-wise, but the price is worth the difference if the time ever comes in which you actually have to make use of it.
    ($15 for 15 rounds of "WTF!,why isnt this guy STOPPING" vs. $20 for 2 rounds of "whew, glad I made it through that..." can make all the difference.)
    Thanks for your reply. Although cost is important it's not so much an issue for me at the moment, however I am concerned about the physical difficulty of firing higher caliber. I'm certain I can handle .22lr and 9mm rounds, however I am 6 foot 3 and weigh just 140lbs. I'm able to lift ~50 lbs around my workplace, but I'm not a very strong person. How much strength does it take to fire those larger .45 ACP, etc calibers?

  8. #8
    Activist Member N605TW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    117
    Go to a range that rents guns or find a few friends that will let you shoot theirs. Try as many guns and calibers as you can to find what works for you. I'm in the same height and weight class as you and carry a Gen4 Glock 17.

    I don't buy into the "don't trust any caliber that doesn't start with 4" mentality. I have yet to find anyone willing to go down range and catch my "girly 9s" Shot placement is far more important, a hit with a .22 is better than a miss with a .50

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Longmont, Colorado
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by N605TW View Post
    Go to a range that rents guns or find a few friends that will let you shoot theirs. Try as many guns and calibers as you can to find what works for you. I'm in the same height and weight class as you and carry a Gen4 Glock 17.

    I don't buy into the "don't trust any caliber that doesn't start with 4" mentality. I have yet to find anyone willing to go down range and catch my "girly 9s" Shot placement is far more important, a hit with a .22 is better than a miss with a .50
    That's very reassuring to hear, thanks!

  10. #10
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    fl
    Posts
    1,848
    Quote Originally Posted by Zach C. Nelson View Post
    Thanks for your reply. Although cost is important it's not so much an issue for me at the moment, however I am concerned about the physical difficulty of firing higher caliber. I'm certain I can handle .22lr and 9mm rounds, however I am 6 foot 3 and weigh just 140lbs. I'm able to lift ~50 lbs around my workplace, but I'm not a very strong person. How much strength does it take to fire those larger .45 ACP, etc calibers?
    Well, here's the irony, and yet another myth de-bunked.
    For .45s via a Glock (or similar design-Springfield XD, Taurus 24/7, 800 ,etc.) there's less actual felt recoil than 9mm or .40. A lot of folks have this false impression that because the round is "bigger" it's going to recoil a lot worse. .45 is a lower-pressure round than either 9mm or .40 - actually closer to .380/9mm Mak etc.

    What "recoil" there is, is actually more of a gentle shove back into the meat of the hand, vs. the "flip" of the muzzle with the 9mm/.40
    Me, personally, I cant hit worth a hoot with either of those, when rapid-fire or double-tapping. .45 though? a breeze.
    In 1911 types (steel -framed, not alum -framed) the weight of the pistol itself tames a lot of the "recoil".

    10mm, I felt, was a little more kick than .45. Havent fired much .357 Sig, so will leave that one to those who use it.

    Do yourself a favor, and try one of each out, if you can. You will likely be very surprised.
    Last edited by j4l; 05-13-2012 at 05:03 PM.

  11. #11
    Regular Member tcmech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    369
    Good choice, I have a glock 17 that has never failed to work for me in the 20 or so years that I have owned it. Get a blackhawk serpa holster for it, if you like leather instead there are several makers that offer good holsters for it, I like don hume and backwoods leather prodocts personally.

    Follow the range rules and the generally accepted rules of gun handling and you will be alright.
    If Obama is the answer; how stupid was the question?

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern Nevada, ,
    Posts
    708
    Pros: Reliable, Accurate, Simple, Light

    Cons: No external safety, Sights unsuited for targets, Sights unsuited for defense, Trigger unsuited for targets


    You can take the NRA basic handgun safety course and hopefully develop good habits. Sticking your finger in the trigger guard is a bad habit for a Glock, which doesn't have an external safety.

  13. #13
    Regular Member MKEgal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    in front of my computer, WI
    Posts
    4,396
    Quote Originally Posted by Zach
    What's recommended for first time buyer/user?
    (ie. one-on-one with an NRA member/instructor? beginner's class?)
    If you have someone knowledgable (relative?) who can teach you the basics, that's a reasonable way to start.
    Would have been nice to start learning when you were maybe 5 or 6, but at least you're here now.

    It'd be good anyway to take a structured class, of whatever flavor, as long as it's backed by a reputable organization. (Check credentials & reputation.)
    I lean toward NRA 'cause AFAIK they've been around the longest & I'm certified by them.
    (That's a link to the class search page. You probably want to start with a Basic Pistol course. Put your zip in at the bottom of the page, & a search radius.)

    What sort of "gear" will I need?
    For carrying, a holster with some sort of retention. Can be a strap you unsnap w/ your thumb, or a button to push, or several things you have to do at once. (Will you remember the combination in an emergency?)

    Cleaning supplies. Get a small kit @ the store; it should have solvent, oil, fabric patches, a wire brush, something that looks like the eye of a needle, & a rod. Might have more. The brush has to be the right size for your barrel.

    A case, preferably locking. (Must be hard-sided & locking for air & rail travel, & only you have the key or combination.)
    A safe for your home.
    Consider a safe for your car, one that cable-locks (or is bolted) to the car.
    Eye & ear protection for practicing.

    Is it as hard as it looks to clean firearms?
    For a Glock, no. It's simple to take them apart & put them back together. Just read the owner's manual to see where to occasionally put a small drop of oil.
    ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS triple-check that your Glock is completely unloaded before starting to clean it!
    The one feature I dislike about them is that you have to pull the trigger to take it apart.

    While it's written for & by women, there's a lot of useful beginner info on www.corneredcat.com
    Safety, care & feeding, shooting basics, all sorts of questions commonly asked by people new to shooting (hi there!)...
    Gun cleaning & the 4 rules
    Gun cleaning 101
    Gun cleaning 102: cleaning a Glock
    That last has very detailed instructions & good pictures.
    Hint: it's much easier to clean just after using, once it's cool enough to handle.

    Quote Originally Posted by kcgunfan
    Under federal law, you have to be 21 to purchase a handgun from a FFL. You have to be 18 to purchase it in a private sale.
    ... at the range the RSO (Range Safety Officer) will be happy to go over [rules] with you.
    ... Learn the 4 rules of firearm safety well, as well as how to apply them: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Co...irearms_safety
    What he said. Check out www.handgunlaw.us & click on your state (or whatever state you plan to visit) to learn about the laws there. Their PDFs include links to state sites & resources, so you can read the original for yourself. Very important.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zach
    I couldn't find a way to multiquote on the forum, so replying to each one individually.
    Look in the lower right of each post. See the little + sign? Click on that. See how it turns to a checkmark? That means that when you eventually click "reply to thread" that post will be quoted.
    It's also nice to delete parts of posts that aren't relevant to your reply. Saves space & reading.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zach
    I am concerned about the physical difficulty of firing higher caliber.
    ...I'm not a very strong person. How much strength does it take to fire those larger .45 ACP, etc calibers?
    The trigger pull is the same no matter the caliber. (Though you can get lighter or heavier than normal triggers.)
    For recoil on the larger calibers, lean into it a bit more. Pay attention to the basics of stance & grip & it shouldn't be a problem. [See above about taking a class from a reputable source.]
    A full-size pistol, such as the G17, will have less recoil than the "baby Glocks" (G26 for the 9mm).

    Quote Originally Posted by Yard Sale
    Cons: No external safety, Sights unsuited for targets, Sights unsuited for defense, Trigger unsuited for targets

    Glocks do have an external safety. It's built into the trigger.
    If your finger isn't on the trigger, all 3 safeties are on.
    If your finger squeezes the trigger squarely, the trigger safety is taken off, which allows the 2 internal safeties to come off, which allows the gun to go bang.
    Here's a neat little thing - an interactive illustrated Glock (that's what it says on the page).

    As for the rest, I'm able to target shoot just fine with all of mine, & for SD you won't have time to use sights.
    Last edited by MKEgal; 05-14-2012 at 04:02 PM.

  14. #14
    Regular Member 45acpForMe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,817
    Quote Originally Posted by j4l View Post
    Well, here's the irony, and yet another myth de-bunked.
    For .45s via a Glock (or similar design-Springfield XD, Taurus 24/7, 800 ,etc.) there's less actual felt recoil than 9mm or .40. A lot of folks have this false impression that because the round is "bigger" it's going to recoil a lot worse. .45 is a lower-pressure round than either 9mm or .40 - actually closer to .380/9mm Mak etc.

    What "recoil" there is, is actually more of a gentle shove back into the meat of the hand, vs. the "flip" of the muzzle with the 9mm/.40
    Me, personally, I cant hit worth a hoot with either of those, when rapid-fire or double-tapping. .45 though? a breeze.
    In 1911 types (steel -framed, not alum -framed) the weight of the pistol itself tames a lot of the "recoil".

    10mm, I felt, was a little more kick than .45. Havent fired much .357 Sig, so will leave that one to those who use it.

    Do yourself a favor, and try one of each out, if you can. You will likely be very surprised.
    Yes I prefer the recoil of .45acp over 9mm and 40s&w. Alot depends on the gun you are shooting it out of. My NAA .32acp hurts my hand after a few rounds. My Kahr MK40 is better but isn't fun to shoot for extended times. I can shoot my .45acp guns all day long. :-)

    .357 Sig has about the same recoil as a .40 S&W since it is basically a .40 cased down to a 9mm bullet. I was a bit disappointed when I got a .357 barrel for a P226 I have in .40s&w when no large fireball came out when I fired it. :-)

    There are many good things about Glock and many people have them. I prefer other makes but get what you want or you won't be happy. If you can try out guns that friends have or rent them to see which you like best. Guns are alot like shoes, you don't know how much you like them until you try them on. :-)
    "Cogito, ergo armatum sum: I think, therefore I am armed."

  15. #15
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    fl
    Posts
    1,848
    Quote Originally Posted by 45acpForMe View Post
    Yes I prefer the recoil of .45acp over 9mm and 40s&w. Alot depends on the gun you are shooting it out of. My NAA .32acp hurts my hand after a few rounds. My Kahr MK40 is better but isn't fun to shoot for extended times. I can shoot my .45acp guns all day long. :-)

    .357 Sig has about the same recoil as a .40 S&W since it is basically a .40 cased down to a 9mm bullet. I was a bit disappointed when I got a .357 barrel for a P226 I have in .40s&w when no large fireball came out when I fired it. :-)

    There are many good things about Glock and many people have them. I prefer other makes but get what you want or you won't be happy. If you can try out guns that friends have or rent them to see which you like best. Guns are alot like shoes, you don't know how much you like them until you try them on. :-)
    Exactly.
    And I like Glocks- think they're perhaps THE best fighting handgun innovation since the 1911A1. But few of them fit my hands well for a secure grasp (short, stubby, thug fingers) during firing that I'd feel safe, or accurate doing so as a carry gun.
    And, I prefer hammers and thumb-safety's (sorry, just to darned set in my ways, having grown up on 1911's) -even more so with with DA/SA and de-cockers, of late.
    But great pistols, you'll never hear me knocking em.

  16. #16
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern Nevada, ,
    Posts
    708
    Quote Originally Posted by MKEgal View Post
    Glocks do have an external safety. It's built into the trigger.
    Spare us the pedantry. The fact is there is nothing to prevent the trigger from firing the gun. Zach said he was a noob, so he's likely to not have developed finger-outside-the-guard habits, and he's more likely to do something noobish like get his shirt caught on the trigger while holstering. Even reaching for a Glock on the nightstand in the dark is more perilous than reaching for a thumb-safety pistol (or a long DA pistol).

    Zach, I'm not discouraging you, I'm cautioning you.

  17. #17
    Regular Member zoom6zoom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Dale City, VA, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,741
    I cannot, in good conscience, recommend 9mm or .40 for it if you intend to possibly use it as a defensive arm, except as a "last-ditch"/ "only thing on-hand" effort.
    Off the top of my head, I can only think of a handful of law enforcement agencies that don't use either 9 or 40.

  18. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Tacoma
    Posts
    192
    Police choose a gun based on how easy it is to carry, qualify with, and clean. Combat military units, on the other hand, choose a sidearm based on dependability and effectiveness. Military units that have the option to choose their sidearm overwhelmingly choose the 1911 .45APC. After all, the average policeman will draw his weapon far fewer times than a Navy SEAL will use his.
    What sort of man would put a known criminal in charge of a major branch of government? Apart from, say, the average voter.

    I believe in freedom, Mr. Lipwig. Not many people do, although they will, of course, protest otherwise. And no practical definition of freedom would be complete without the freedom to take the consequences. Indeed, it is the freedom upon which all the others are based.

    The freedom to succeed goes hand in hand with the freedom to fail. - Going Postal, Terry Pratchett

  19. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    fl
    Posts
    1,848
    Quote Originally Posted by zoom6zoom View Post
    Off the top of my head, I can only think of a handful of law enforcement agencies that don't use either 9 or 40.
    Which is yet another reason NOT to. The 9 has systematically failed them, more often than not, on the street. Hence the switch-by all but about 2 dept.s , as of now, to .40. Which itself turned about to almost as dismal a failure as the 9.
    If given their choice-(as opposed to what a dept. mandates) most would prefer to be carrying a .357 sig or .45
    There's also a reason the Military wants very much to go back to .45 the next time they replace their pistols. Most SF/ SOCCOM units already have, as have many Marine units.

  20. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Suffolk Virginia
    Posts
    686
    45 recoil is nothing. I have a M&P Smith n Wesson .45, and I love it. Adjustable grips, night sights, thumb safety, and a mag safety. I will say this, if you do go .45, it's best if you can buy online. If you shop around, you can find prices rather close to 9mm prices.

    I totally agree on the caliber thing. I know I wouldn't want to be shot buy any caliber, so personally see nothing wrong with the 9mm caliber.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  21. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    St. Louis, MO / Rolla, MO
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by Levi View Post
    Police choose a gun based on how easy it is to carry, qualify with, and clean. Combat military units, on the other hand, choose a sidearm based on dependability and effectiveness. Military units that have the option to choose their sidearm overwhelmingly choose the 1911 .45APC. After all, the average policeman will draw his weapon far fewer times than a Navy SEAL will use his.
    And a civilian will draw their weapon MUCH less than a cop. You cannot compare military to civilian applications, military uses FMJ so bigger and slower is ideal, civilians can use a hollow point where you want more speed. .40 S&W can generate more energy than a .45 ACP as well as fit more rounds in a smaller gun. If you use a .45 but don't like the gun you're wasting time and money, if you shoot a 9mm with great placement don't change a thing.

  22. #22
    Regular Member MainelyGlock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Portland, ME
    Posts
    630
    You really can't go wrong with a Glock. I think the biggest reason shooters dislike them are because of the ergonomics, but they'll grow on you if you're not used to them.

    My first one was a Gen 3 Glock 22, chambered in .40S&W. I'd never shot a .40, but I figured that if I could become proficient with a larger caliber then shooting a smaller one would be easier more or less. I still have it (my former OC gun) and it now lives on my nightstand, with a 31-round magazine and a light/laser combo attached to the rail.

    A good thing about Glocks is that not only are they reliable right out of the box, but there is a plethora of aftermarket parts and accessories you can use with and on them. I've come across a lot of people with the "the best Glock is a stock Glock" mentality, but I'm not one of them. For example, a few things I have on my Gen 4 Glock 22 are a LaserMax laser, 3.5LB trigger, night sights, Pachmayr rubber grip and magpul speed plates on each of the three magazines. Not necessary, but each helps in their own way and serves a useful purpose, especially when I carry it. (everyday)

    If you're set on a Glock, or particularly the G17, I'd recommend trying out both the Gen 3 and the Gen 4 models. I am not at all a fan of the grip texture on the Gen 4 Glocks, and if you've been using an older one for awhile the re-designed recoil spring can take some getting used to. Aside from the spring, and the ability to switch the mag release for a left hand shooter, there's not a huge difference between the last two generations. You can buy a police trade-in Gen 3 Glock for as low as $300 on some websites, and those mostly include night sites from what I've seen which is a huge plus. I bought my Gen 3 for about $350 via a private sale, and my Gen 4 for $400 online because it was a police trade in (SPP?).

    Sorry for the novel! Hope that helps in some way.
    Once more into the fray.
    Into the last good fight I'll ever know.
    Live and die on this day.
    Live and die on this day.



    "I knew one thing: as soon as anyone said you didn't need a gun, you'd better take one along that worked."
    Raymond Chandler

  23. #23
    Regular Member MainelyGlock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Portland, ME
    Posts
    630
    Quote Originally Posted by j4l View Post
    Which is yet another reason NOT to. The 9 has systematically failed them, more often than not, on the street. Hence the switch-by all but about 2 dept.s , as of now, to .40. Which itself turned about to almost as dismal a failure as the 9.
    If given their choice-(as opposed to what a dept. mandates) most would prefer to be carrying a .357 sig or .45
    There's also a reason the Military wants very much to go back to .45 the next time they replace their pistols. Most SF/ SOCCOM units already have, as have many Marine units.
    Mind giving some evidence as to why the 9 and .40 calibers are so catastrophic?
    Once more into the fray.
    Into the last good fight I'll ever know.
    Live and die on this day.
    Live and die on this day.



    "I knew one thing: as soon as anyone said you didn't need a gun, you'd better take one along that worked."
    Raymond Chandler

  24. #24
    Regular Member ryan7068's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA
    Posts
    185

    Glock 23

    IMO: Glocks are great guns. I also like Sigs but they are quite heavy compared to a glock. I personally dont quite have large enough hands to carry a full sized ones so I opted to go with the compact. This also makes it more reasonable as a CC gun. Glocks are super reliable out of the box. I have heard estimates of 200,000 rounds through rental guns at range with not failures whatsoever. In any case, Glocks are realatively easy to completely disassemble and clean or to swap parts. I also have put on the marine firing pin cups and shot a full magazine underwater with no failures. As far as caliber, I would tend to agree with many posts on here, bigger is better for self defense. You get more punch effect and less pierce. Ideally you don't want the round to pass through you target if you can help it. Id hate to injure or kill some poor fella down the street or in the next room. But as you can tell, I use the .40 cal and for self defense rounds I use the lower weight critical defense rounds that are rated quite highly by multiple ballistics testers on the net. In anycase, to each his own. Ones well placed shot from a .22 can stop a person as quickly as a .50 cal can. Just be sure to hit what you aim at and always know whats beyound your target.
    "Yes, I am carrying a loaded firearm. Why aren't you? "

  25. #25
    Regular Member hjmoosejaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    N.W. Pa.
    Posts
    416
    Howdy Zach! There has been a lot of very good advice given to you here. All I can add is, you have taken a very responsible step, as far as asking for advice and trying to learn as much as you can. However, don't ever forget that as fun, interesting, and even sexy as guns can be, they are still guns. Along with having them and handling them, they are a very huge responsibility. Routinely carrying them in everyday life is another huge decision. Always keep in mind, what is hanging on your hip. You will have to apply a lot of common sense and self discipline. If your friends are at a bonfire drinking beer, that's probably not the place to where it. You don't want to blow away a friend cause he's drunk and thinks he could kick your ass. You don't take it out at a party to show everybody how cool you are, that kind of stuff. Remember, you are representing every responsible gun owner out there. One drawback, is your age. While you may be responsible, not everybody else is. Especially a bunch of young bucks out there to prove themselves. Sounds like you have a good start. Ask questions, learn, and enjoy every aspect of gun ownership, glad to have ya! Above all, be SMART, be RESPONSIBLE, and be SAFE !
    watch your top knot !

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •