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Thread: The Most Expensive Gun Buyback EVER!

  1. #1
    Regular Member Superlite27's Avatar
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    The Most Expensive Gun Buyback EVER!

    O.K. Here goes: I have an idea.

    One of the many things that completely burns my hide are the futile, pointless, and ill conceived notions called a "gun buyback". There is almost nothing in existence that fails to achieve its advertised goal as significantly as the hairbrained scheme that uses taxpayer money to "get guns off the street" but in reality only serves to "get grandpa's priceless combat used WWII Garand melted down for a $100 Wal-Mart gift card".

    Therefore, I have devoted a significant amount of time (10 minutes) dreaming of a counterhairbrained scheme to foil these hairbrained schemes. (or at least throw a large sized monkey wrench into the gears).

    So, I would appreciate input on all aspects such as legality, feasibility, and consequences of the following idea:

    What if....as many members as possible manufactured the highest quality "gun looking objects" as possible, and as they were built, sent them to a "collection depository" such as someone's garage, storage unit, or other such location to be used as a stockpile. (It is legal to make realistic replicas as long as they aren't functional firearms, correct? I don't want to suggest anything illegal.) Then, when such-and-such city announces one of those wonderful gun buy-backs, these stockpiled "gun looking objects" could be shipped to a participating member of the group and distributed to anyone and everyone (such as family and friends....or heck, even that guy walking his dog) to be exchanged for those police department provided gift cards. Wouldn't this be a win/win situation? The cops can claim to be "taking guns off the street" (which would be true. Just not the type of dangerous evil guns they wish. Kinda' like now.) and you and all your friends can enjoy a new pair of Wal-Mart sneakers knowing the police ran out of funds melting down some finely crafted and gorgeously stained pine lumber and 1/4" tubing instead of Uncle Harry's unfired, new-in-box, Smith and Wesson model 10.

    #1) Would this be legal?
    #2) Is this a good idea?

    Along with previous questions above.

  2. #2
    Founder's Club Member thebigsd's Avatar
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    Hmm, not a bad idea in theory...what would the consequences of getting caught be? Could you be charged with fraud or something along those lines? This would be an idea to discuss with an attorney, after we all weigh in, if you're serious.

  3. #3
    Regular Member papa bear's Avatar
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    not a bad idea, but i still like setting across the street and offering a hundred dollars for guns and letting gun owners keep them. but still if you could sell fake guns to the grabber......
    Luke 22:36 ; 36Then said he unto them, But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.

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    i you call a CHP a CCW then you are really stupid. period.

  4. #4
    Regular Member markush's Avatar
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    The first problem that comes to my mind is....it's a gun buy back not a painted lumber buy back

  5. #5
    Herr Heckler Koch
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    Why doesn't the gun buyer have to have an FFL and do 4473 and state requirements on each transaction? Does he not meet the requirements for a federal firearms license?

  6. #6
    Regular Member Superlite27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markush View Post
    The first problem that comes to my mind is....it's a gun buy back not a painted lumber buy back
    Have you seen some of the crap they fork over gift certificates for? If it even remotely resembles a gun, they usually don't argue. If they do, a snide comment such as, "I'll bet you that gift certificate the bank teller I point this at will think it's real." will usually be enough to convince them it's close enough to be considered a gun.
    Remember, their point isn't to actually get guns out of the hands of criminals. Everyone and their dog can plainly see that a line full of elderly folks and mom's carrying kids aren't the key demographic of gang bangers. They often redirect to "household safety" and preventing accidents when asked about all the blue hairs who fail to resemble your typical Gangsta Deciple or MS 13 member. Their overall goal they try to acheive is that glorious camera shot of a pile of "evil gang guns" they can show all the news watchers to show how effective they are at "getting guns off the street". They'll take anything that appears to have a barrel coupled with some form of handle. If they don't, they will have no grease to lube the wheels of their propaganda machine other than Uncle Elmer's rusty squirrel gun and Tommy's Red Ryder.


    Quote Originally Posted by Herr Heckler Koch View Post
    Why doesn't the gun buyer have to have an FFL and do 4473 and state requirements on each transaction? Does he not meet the requirements for a federal firearms license?
    Good question. However, I've purchased many firearms without an FFL. I was unaware an FFL was needed to purchase. Maybe in bulk. I'm unfamiliar with the requirements for purchasing more than one at a time as I've never done so. However, the requirement for a 4473 is a good point. How can someone take possession of a firearm without the wonderful, forever altruistic Brady Background check? After all, they highly tout it's use. As a matter of fact, I thought their was a major outcry against the "gun show loophole" allowing private transactions.
    I imagine they'll use the old, "Well, we're police officers" catch all explanation. Or else, they'll pull the ol' "private transaction" excuse. (The very thing the Brady's are outraged at anyone using to circumvent the 4473 process.) After all, in typical Brady fashion: It's bad if YOU do something, but O.K. for the cops because they have shiny metal disks. Shiny metal disks make everything that's bad for everyone suddenly become good.

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    In some states/cities, every transaction involving a firearm and someone other than the police needs to go through either an FFL or the police, sometimes both. Since the police are doing the buy-back (a false label if ever there was one) this may eliminate the need for an FFL, not sure.

    My biggest problems with these programs is that 1) they cost money that municipalities don't have right now, which could be used for other purposes (firearms training, maybe) and 2) they are usually no questions asked, so if you need to get rid of a gun used in a crime this is the best way to do it, and get paid to destroy evidence at the same time.

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    I like that idea... Not that they'd do such a thing in my area (at least not that I've heard of in the past 10+ years), but if they did, I imagine it'd be a great place to go scouting for some good deals. If the police are offering $100, I'd offer $110 for anything I thought was a good deal, and there aren't many firearms I could see not being a good deal at that price Of course, where I live there is no FFL requirement for private party transactions.
    Last edited by gobbly; 06-05-2012 at 02:36 PM.

  9. #9
    Regular Member Baked on Grease's Avatar
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    Last gun buy program I saw had a guy or two turn in a "Trainer" M72 LAW and RPG-7. Clearly not of working design but they took them anyway....

    So we could try a test run... Make about 10 trainer tubes with about $200 worth of pvc, wood and paint then turn them in for easy $800 profit. Assuming it's legal to make "Trainer" versions nowadays...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Superlite27 View Post
    O.K. Here goes: I have an idea.

    One of the many things that completely burns my hide are the futile, pointless, and ill conceived notions called a "gun buyback". There is almost nothing in existence that fails to achieve its advertised goal as significantly as the hairbrained scheme that uses taxpayer money to "get guns off the street" but in reality only serves to "get grandpa's priceless combat used WWII Garand melted down for a $100 Wal-Mart gift card".

    Therefore, I have devoted a significant amount of time (10 minutes) dreaming of a counterhairbrained scheme to foil these hairbrained schemes. (or at least throw a large sized monkey wrench into the gears).

    So, I would appreciate input on all aspects such as legality, feasibility, and consequences of the following idea:

    What if....as many members as possible manufactured the highest quality "gun looking objects" as possible, and as they were built, sent them to a "collection depository" such as someone's garage, storage unit, or other such location to be used as a stockpile. (It is legal to make realistic replicas as long as they aren't functional firearms, correct? I don't want to suggest anything illegal.) Then, when such-and-such city announces one of those wonderful gun buy-backs, these stockpiled "gun looking objects" could be shipped to a participating member of the group and distributed to anyone and everyone (such as family and friends....or heck, even that guy walking his dog) to be exchanged for those police department provided gift cards. Wouldn't this be a win/win situation? The cops can claim to be "taking guns off the street" (which would be true. Just not the type of dangerous evil guns they wish. Kinda' like now.) and you and all your friends can enjoy a new pair of Wal-Mart sneakers knowing the police ran out of funds melting down some finely crafted and gorgeously stained pine lumber and 1/4" tubing instead of Uncle Harry's unfired, new-in-box, Smith and Wesson model 10.

    #1) Would this be legal?
    #2) Is this a good idea?

    Along with previous questions above.
    It's been done before. People have simply gone out to the store, and bought fairly realistic looking (metal) BB guns. There are also people who buy those $20 non functioning pot metal pistols like old rusted up Lorcins, and Jennings, specifically to have on hand to trade in for way more than what they are worth at one of these "buy backs".

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    I have enough junk and old barrels to put together 4 or 5 hundred dollars, maby more?????

    And I would love to have a new rock-river predator pursuit .223

    The best way to stop this, is to let them buy us some more guns. And its legal

  12. #12
    Regular Member HighFlyingA380's Avatar
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    Not a bad idea, but I personally don't like wasting taxpayer money like that. If there were actually buybacks were I live, I'd much rather go down and offer a couple bucks more to the people in line, and turn them around for a hefty profit that goes in my pocket. I think that would hit the coppers harder, since they wouldn't ever know about the "fake" guns. And yeah, I feel like there would be some sort of legal issue with your suggestion.
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  13. #13
    Regular Member DCKilla's Avatar
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    Buying a replica and turning it in for a profit sounds better to me. Why not OC while doing it?

  14. #14
    Regular Member Superlite27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HighFlyingA380 View Post
    Not a bad idea, but I personally don't like wasting taxpayer money like that.....And yeah, I feel like there would be some sort of legal issue with your suggestion.
    Wasting taxpayer money? THEY'RE GOING TO SPEND IT REGARDLESS OF YOUR DEFINITION OF "WASTING"! Basically, what you are saying is, if the cops buy Uncle Harold's Colt Single Action Army and melt it down, that's not wasting taxpayer money, but buying your 3/8" tubing and pine "gunlike object" is? The taxpayer dollars are gone in both instances. However, it seems a little backwards to me that you consider the melting of a priceless and valuable funtioning firearm as legitimate use of our tax dollars.....but if they melt down a replica it's a "waste". Personally, I consider the former a bigger waste.

    I feel like there's something about this plan that isn't "on the level" as well.....but I can't put a finger on it. That's why I'm asking. At the end of things, I cannot find anything in writing, or any laws specifically addressing anything illegal in this idea. As we all know, if there's nothing expressly forbidding an action, it is legal. If the police are going to construct and implement such a hairbrained and pointless scheme to combat a nonexistent problem....I should have the liberty to construct a hairbrained scheme of my own. At least MY crazy plan has a goal that serves multiple purposes: 1) Burn the taxpayer money that the cops are going to spend anyway to prevent it from being used to melt down irreplaceable firearms, 2) Get me a new pair of Wal-Mart sneakers, and 3) Provide a means to take an active role participating in my chosen cause instead of just sitting on the couch lamenting the state of the universe.

    Quote Originally Posted by DCKilla View Post
    Buying a replica and turning it in for a profit sounds better to me. Why not OC while doing it?
    I once went to a gun buyback in St. Louis just to observe what was going on. As I approached the door, (It was held inside a church gymnasium) an officer inspecting firearms to ensure they weren't loaded noticed my 1911 in its holster and (hee-hee!) reached for it to conduct the unloading procedure. SUDDENLY....he must have realized "That's a holstered carry weapon!" and froze with a jerk in mid-reach and finally looked at me instead of just going through the repetitive motions of inspecting the herd.

    "You can't go in there with that."

    I was made to leave as I had no "buy-back" firearm, and was informed that the property owner (the church that donated the use of their gymnasium) did not allow loaded weapons on their property. As I walked back to my vehicle, I was shadowed by three St. Louis Metro cops.

    So, no. OC'ing while participating in a buy-back is not practical. Nothing stopping you, but don't be surprised if you're asked to leave if it's on private property.

    I have no experience with buybacks on public property. That would be some interesting research.

  15. #15
    Regular Member HighFlyingA380's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superlite27 View Post
    Wasting taxpayer money? THEY'RE GOING TO SPEND IT REGARDLESS OF YOUR DEFINITION OF "WASTING"! Basically, what you are saying is, if the cops buy Uncle Harold's Colt Single Action Army and melt it down, that's not wasting taxpayer money, but buying your 3/8" tubing and pine "gunlike object" is? The taxpayer dollars are gone in both instances. However, it seems a little backwards to me that you consider the melting of a priceless and valuable funtioning firearm as legitimate use of our tax dollars.....but if they melt down a replica it's a "waste". Personally, I consider the former a bigger waste.
    I absolutely think buying back legitimate guns is also a huge waste of taxpayer money. My post was only addressing the buyback of fake guns. I just personally feel that if I can buy some of those guns first, it would not only save some taxpayer money, but also may save some fine historical piece. Granted, I don't know the inner workings of buybacks, but my suspicion is that they don't inspect the firearms again after they are bought. So, if a fake gun makes it past the first "inspection" and is bought, the cops won't ever know that it is fake. Therefore, they will think the buyback is actually more successful than it actually is, thus causing the opposite of the intended. As I already stated, I feel that doing a private party purchase would hit them harder, save some great guns, and be more visible, both to the cops and public.

    PS, I live in MO too, and have never heard of buybacks here. Granted, I've only seriously been on the gun scene for a couple years. Are they still one regularly here?
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  16. #16
    Regular Member Superlite27's Avatar
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    I agree with you. I'd much rather purchase those firearms to see that they weren't destroyed. This would, indeed, be preferable to me, as well.

    Unfortunately, I have forgotten where I parked my truckload of money. Considering that the budget for these buybacks often reaches six figures, the funds available for me to compete are pretty lopsided. Therefore, in an examination of tactics, if I cannot increase my funds to level the playing field, the only remaining option is to reduce theirs. Consequently, this also increases mine.

    (A second lightbulb begins to glow!)

    We could take the gift certificates we get for our gunlike objects, go across the street, and exchange them for the antiques granny would have had melted down by the police buyback! This would double the effectiveness of the entire idea! Not only is the available "reward incentive" (gift ertificates) decreased in exchange for worthless crap instead of priceless heirlooms, it is reused to decrease the number of heirlooms headed for the furnaces!

    The last buyback I know of was the one I attended in St. Louis about four years ago. I haven't heard of one since, and I keep my ears open to the slightest rumor of one. I am unfamiliar with the KC side of MO.

    However, my idea is for the entire firearms community, nationwide. This kooky idea is still just an idea rattling around in my head. I'm currently wondering how practical it would be to obtain a place to store these "gunlike objects" such as a storage unit, the interest in participants across the country, the possible consequences of inevitable screw-ups, (What if someone actually mails a real firearm instead of a replica "gunlike object"?), shipping all these gunlike objects to participants who have a gun buyback in their area, and the actual effects of the entire scheme.

    While it may be an interesting idea, the practicality of moving it from fantasy to reality is starting to become unlikely.

  17. #17
    Regular Member F350's Avatar
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    I had just returned from 2 years in Iraq as a civilian contractor and did have some "play" money when I heard about the gun buy back in St. Louis. I was going to park outside with a big sign "SHOW IT TO ME FIRST" on my truck (Missouri is a no check FTF state)..... But the wife informed me she already had "us" booked for an other engagement that day

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    Quote Originally Posted by Superlite27 View Post
    I agree with you. I'd much rather purchase those firearms to see that they weren't destroyed. This would, indeed, be preferable to me, as well.

    Unfortunately, I have forgotten where I parked my truckload of money. Considering that the budget for these buybacks often reaches six figures, the funds available for me to compete are pretty lopsided. Therefore, in an examination of tactics, if I cannot increase my funds to level the playing field, the only remaining option is to reduce theirs. Consequently, this also increases mine.

    (A second lightbulb begins to glow!)

    We could take the gift certificates we get for our gunlike objects, go across the street, and exchange them for the antiques granny would have had melted down by the police buyback! This would double the effectiveness of the entire idea! Not only is the available "reward incentive" (gift ertificates) decreased in exchange for worthless crap instead of priceless heirlooms, it is reused to decrease the number of heirlooms headed for the furnaces!

    The last buyback I know of was the one I attended in St. Louis about four years ago. I haven't heard of one since, and I keep my ears open to the slightest rumor of one. I am unfamiliar with the KC side of MO.

    However, my idea is for the entire firearms community, nationwide. This kooky idea is still just an idea rattling around in my head. I'm currently wondering how practical it would be to obtain a place to store these "gunlike objects" such as a storage unit, the interest in participants across the country, the possible consequences of inevitable screw-ups, (What if someone actually mails a real firearm instead of a replica "gunlike object"?), shipping all these gunlike objects to participants who have a gun buyback in their area, and the actual effects of the entire scheme.

    While it may be an interesting idea, the practicality of moving it from fantasy to reality is starting to become unlikely.
    Your over thinking it, like I said a metal BB gun, or one of those cheap blank firing guns the scammers try to sell in every gun magazine would be better because they look more realistic. Not to mention that they can be had for about the same price as building something, are more convenient, and are available nationwide already with no need for "warehouses" scattered across the country.

  19. #19
    Regular Member HighFlyingA380's Avatar
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    Looks like some people are coming out about doing this type of thing: http://www.suntimes.com/news/crime/1...-gun-camp.html
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