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Thread: Anyone shoot IDPA? (StL area)

  1. #1
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    Anyone shoot IDPA? (StL area)

    Just went to a match at Benchrest Rifle Club this month, and I'm thinking I'm hooked. I didn't even shoot. Just watched. It looks like a ton of fun and great practical practice.

    Anyone on here have experience with IDPA? Or recommendations for noobies?

  2. #2
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    mspgunner goes a lot. Haven't seen him on in a while. May want to send him a message.

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    I shoot IDPA at Benchrest whenever I can. You should take your gear and try it sometime. This Saturday Benchrest is hosting a HOT Match, which will be pistol and rifle. I plan to shoot in that match.

    Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Morpheus97 View Post
    I shoot IDPA at Benchrest whenever I can. You should take your gear and try it sometime. This Saturday Benchrest is hosting a HOT Match, which will be pistol and rifle. I plan to shoot in that match.

    Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk 2
    Yea I went and watched the IDPA match June. They mentioned the HOT match, unfortunately I already had plans for that day. And I don't have a rifle to use, unless a Ruger 10/22 counts.

    I'm definitely planning on shooting the July match though.

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    mpsgunner can probably clue you in on one or more of the bigger matches in the STL area.

    Just remember one important thing about IDPA. It's not to be confused with training. It's a game. Some folks from IDPA HQ finally had to put an article out in USCCA magazine to cover just such an issue because of folks that used things like IPSC, USPSA, and IDPA as training when it is not and it creates inherent training failures when it is relied upon for that purpose. You can train yourself around it when you recognize the differences, which can make it quite fun.

    Some of the scenarios can get absolutely crazy on the "what if" scale. So much so that a shooter can find themselves shaking their head at some scenarios. I've noticed that some shooters get their heads in the game so well that the scenario is secondary to looking for that target and hitting the Zero zones. They're truly dialed in.


    Here's the rulebook, read through it and take note of some key areas with info you'll want/need to know. Commands and equipment are a couple of important areas. Some of the equipment stuff can really get confusing when it comes to what will pass and what won't or what class your firearm may fall into. Safety is the MOST important area, like understanding the 180 rule.

    http://www.idpa.com/Documents/IDPARuleBook2005.pdf

    When you get to your first match, expect to be amped up enough that you'll make mistakes. Everyone does and with certain scenarios experienced shooters can even get over-amped and make mistakes. Compete against yourself to start, then transition into becoming competitive with others in your division. If you can find a local to the event area you choose that is willing to tow you around and let you get a feel for IDPA as you learn on the fly, that seems to be one of the best ways to get folks into the game.

    Welcome to what can be some of the most stressful, adrenaline pumping, fun you'll have!

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    Welcome to what can be some of the most stressful, adrenaline pumping, fun you'll have!
    Thanks! I did speak to mspgunner briefly about it too. Also went and watched a match last month so I'd know sorta what's going on before I get there for real. I can definitely understand some of the scenario's being way out there. But it also seems to promote good habits, like trigger control and such.
    Last edited by Oramac; 07-02-2012 at 09:47 AM.

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    Defensive competitions also promote bad habits. I'll cover a few from IDPA just to give some examples. If we stick to the "this is a game" concept behind competitions then we see why these rules exist...it all comes down to safety.

    IDPA approved holster: Wouldn't want the pistol being able to flop out easily putting everyone at risk. Real world you'll run with what you can afford and what suits your particular needs.

    No ported barrels: This is a MAJOR safety issue with many competitions and defensive instructors, the vents can actually injure the shooter by putting body parts and the face in proximity to them. Real world you're going to use what's immediately available or what you've personally chosen. Some ranges will allow an exemption for a ported barrel with the stipulation that you cannot log your score with IDPA for your records.

    The 180 rule: This is an obvious safety concern to prevent spinning towards spectators/competitors with a loaded firearm. Real world you'll want to scan 360 degrees.

    75% of shots within 15 yards: Though this isn't exactly within the DOJ's statistics, the number isn't far enough off to matter and it gives plenty of room for some extended range shots out to 15 yards. Ranged beyond 15 yards is encouraged and some ranges will certainly put you through the paces on ranged out targets.

    I've enjoyed IDPA over USPSA and I'd love to watch an IPSC match or two to see if I'd like to make a run there.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by REALteach4u View Post
    Defensive competitions also promote bad habits. I'll cover a few from IDPA just to give some examples. If we stick to the "this is a game" concept behind competitions then we see why these rules exist...it all comes down to safety.

    IDPA approved holster: Wouldn't want the pistol being able to flop out easily putting everyone at risk. Real world you'll run with what you can afford and what suits your particular needs.

    No ported barrels: This is a MAJOR safety issue with many competitions and defensive instructors, the vents can actually injure the shooter by putting body parts and the face in proximity to them. Real world you're going to use what's immediately available or what you've personally chosen. Some ranges will allow an exemption for a ported barrel with the stipulation that you cannot log your score with IDPA for your records.

    The 180 rule: This is an obvious safety concern to prevent spinning towards spectators/competitors with a loaded firearm. Real world you'll want to scan 360 degrees.

    75% of shots within 15 yards: Though this isn't exactly within the DOJ's statistics, the number isn't far enough off to matter and it gives plenty of room for some extended range shots out to 15 yards. Ranged beyond 15 yards is encouraged and some ranges will certainly put you through the paces on ranged out targets.

    I've enjoyed IDPA over USPSA and I'd love to watch an IPSC match or two to see if I'd like to make a run there.
    TBH, I see most of those as an advantage. I dont have anything with a ported barrel, and don't plan to get anything either. 15 yards is a solid distance compromise b/n very difficult shots with a small pistol, and relatively easy shots at 3-5 yards. Most of the holsters I've seen advertised, and all the ones I use, are easily IDPA legal.

    Only thing I'd say is an "issue" is the 180* rule. And even then I know why it's in use, and can work around it. It's at least a known quantity, so to speak.

  9. #9
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    There is no 180 rule in IDPA. Though yes, there are supposed to be clear markers in each stage to tell you where not to point your firearm.

    However, most of the clubs have a 180 rule, and the IDPA stages held there will have to accommodate it.

    In general, IDPA is still a sport, with necessary rules to keep it fun.

    I actually stopped doing IDPA, even though I preferred it for fun. It is far easier and more common to cheat, and all the cheating takes the fun out of the competition.

    I SO'd a stage at a state championship. I was so disheartened at the "pros" and their cheating, I never shot it again.
    "It's not important how many people I've killed. What's important is how I get along with the people who are still alive" - Jimmy the Tulip

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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    I SO'd a stage at a state championship. I was so disheartened at the "pros" and their cheating, I never shot it again.
    Don't know what SO'd means, but I'm sorry to hear there were people cheating. Thankfully, I'm not planning no shooting any kind of serious competition, except with myself.

  11. #11
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    "Safety Officer." It's what IDPA calls a range officer. We are the guys running the match on our own time and expense, and getting called names right to our faces from the professional cheaters. My "favorite" was being within earshot (electronic muffs) of a professional shooter verbally telling his son how to cheat on my stage.

    I will say this. Team S&W was at that match, and they were the classiest group of professional shooters I've ever worked with.
    "It's not important how many people I've killed. What's important is how I get along with the people who are still alive" - Jimmy the Tulip

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