Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: webn fireworks

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sparta ky
    Posts
    251
    Last edited by ps1mhd; 08-26-2012 at 09:55 PM. Reason: double post

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Burlington
    Posts
    30
    I have no clue..I was planning on going but am not for sure yet. I hate it when they post no weapons..why? so I wont be able to protect myself? criminals do not pay attention to signs or laws thus the name criminals.

  3. #3
    Regular Member hotrod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Union, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    566
    Quote Originally Posted by Will.40 View Post
    I have no clue..I was planning on going but am not for sure yet. I hate it when they post no weapons..why? so I wont be able to protect myself? criminals do not pay attention to signs or laws thus the name criminals.

    Who posted no weapons?
    Speed is fine
    Accuracy is final

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sparta ky
    Posts
    251
    WEBN FM fireworks



    RULES!?

    YES!
    Come down early
    Bring your family & friends
    Bring a blanket to sit on (Blankets can be placed after 6am on Saturday, park officially opens at 6am on Sunday)
    Bring a radio and crank up the volume to WEBN all day long
    Chairs allowed in designated areas

    NO!
    Alcoholic beverages brought into the event
    Weapons of any type
    Wheeled items -skateboards, bicycles, scooters, rollerblades, etc.
    Large items such as a grill, couch, or other household furnishings
    Pets
    Coolers
    Liquids



    Read more: http://www.webn.com/pages/fwx.html?f...#ixzz24oOnX5sc

  5. #5
    Regular Member hotrod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Union, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    566
    Quote Originally Posted by ps1mhd View Post
    WEBN FM fireworks



    RULES!?

    YES!
    Come down early
    Bring your family & friends
    Bring a blanket to sit on (Blankets can be placed after 6am on Saturday, park officially opens at 6am on Sunday)
    Bring a radio and crank up the volume to WEBN all day long
    Chairs allowed in designated areas

    NO!
    Alcoholic beverages brought into the event
    Weapons of any type
    Wheeled items -skateboards, bicycles, scooters, rollerblades, etc.
    Large items such as a grill, couch, or other household furnishings
    Pets
    Coolers
    Liquids



    Read more: http://www.webn.com/pages/fwx.html?f...#ixzz24oOnX5sc
    I am not the smartest fellow around, but I am pretty sure, no I am positive, that WEBN can not make law in Cincinnati and can not make law in Northern Kentucky. Kentucky and Ohio both are preemptive states. State law exist that says no one, other than the state, can make laws concerning guns. So if the property is for public use and not privately owned, carry on.
    Speed is fine
    Accuracy is final

  6. #6
    Activist Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ashland, KY
    Posts
    1,847
    Quote Originally Posted by hotrod View Post
    I am not the smartest fellow around, but I am pretty sure, no I am positive, that WEBN can not make law in Cincinnati and can not make law in Northern Kentucky. Kentucky and Ohio both are preemptive states. State law exist that says no one, other than the state, can make laws concerning guns. So if the property is for public use and not privately owned, carry on.
    Except Ohio's preemption is pretty lame compared to Kentucky's. In Ohio localities can ban weapons in many places that they can't here in the Bluegrass State.
    "I never in my life seen a Kentuckian without a gun..."-Andrew Jackson

    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are ruined."-Patrick Henry; speaking of protecting the rights of an armed citizenry.

  7. #7
    Regular Member hotrod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Union, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    566
    Quote Originally Posted by KYGlockster View Post
    Except Ohio's preemption is pretty lame compared to Kentucky's. In Ohio localities can ban weapons in many places that they can't here in the Bluegrass State.
    Hey Glockster, can you provide a cite for that. Under Ohio Revised Code 9.68, my understanding is no locality can make any laws that would interfere with the buying, selling, manufacturing,and ownership. If I am wrong, please show me. Thanks

    Beyond the rights granted by the Ohio Constitution, Revised Code 9.68 provides that, unless otherwise prohibited by State or Federal law, any person “may own, possess, purchase, sell, transfer, transport, store, or keep any firearm, part of a firearm, its components, and its ammunition.” Specifically included in this statute is the right to openly carry a firearm. See Revised Code 9.68(C)(1). There is no requirement that the person first get a license, get permission or show any need prior to openly carrying a firearm.
    Last edited by hotrod; 08-28-2012 at 02:03 PM.
    Speed is fine
    Accuracy is final

  8. #8
    Activist Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ashland, KY
    Posts
    1,847
    Quote Originally Posted by hotrod View Post
    Hey Glockster, can you provide a cite for that. Under Ohio Revised Code 9.68, my understanding is no locality can make any laws that would interfere with the buying, selling, manufacturing,and ownership. If I am wrong, please show me. Thanks

    Beyond the rights granted by the Ohio Constitution, Revised Code 9.68 provides that, unless otherwise prohibited by State or Federal law, any person “may own, possess, purchase, sell, transfer, transport, store, or keep any firearm, part of a firearm, its components, and its ammunition.” Specifically included in this statute is the right to openly carry a firearm. See Revised Code 9.68(C)(1). There is no requirement that the person first get a license, get permission or show any need prior to openly carrying a firearm.
    The "unless prohibited by state or federal law" is where the restrictions come from. State law prohibits firearms in a great deal of places. "No firearm" signs have the force of law in Ohio. The carrying of firearms can be banned in government buildings. You can't carry without a license in your own vehicle or any other vehicle. Carry is banned in the state capitol and the state capitol grounds. Ohio considers an AR-15 and similiar weapons that are designed to accept a magazine of 30 rounds or more an "automatic weapon." In Ohio you must surrender your firearm (that you can't carry without a license) to any leo who asks you to do so, and so on.

    This is from the same statute you cited, and I believe it just adds to the restrictiveness of the laws of Ohio:
    (D) This section does not apply to either of the following:

    (1) A zoning ordinance that regulates or prohibits the commercial sale of firearms, firearm components, or ammunition for firearms in areas zoned for residential or agricultural uses;

    (2) A zoning ordinance that specifies the hours of operation or the geographic areas where the commercial sale of firearms, firearm components, or ammunition for firearms may occur, provided that the zoning ordinance is consistent with zoning ordinances for other retail establishments in the same geographic area and does not result in a de facto prohibition of the commercial sale of firearms, firearm components, or ammunition for firearms in areas zoned for commercial, retail, or industrial uses.


    With laws that are this restrictive, the preemption really isn't helping much. It keeps a local government from prohibiting your ability to carry in your vehicle (with a license of course), and on your own property, but not much else. State law already places a large amount of restrictions on carry and other aspects concerning firearms, and that is what I was implying.

    Here is a link to some of Ohio's firearm laws: http://codes.ohio.gov/nllxml/ohiocod...hapter2923.htm
    Last edited by KYGlockster; 08-28-2012 at 05:27 PM.
    "I never in my life seen a Kentuckian without a gun..."-Andrew Jackson

    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are ruined."-Patrick Henry; speaking of protecting the rights of an armed citizenry.

  9. #9
    Regular Member hotrod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Union, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    566
    Quote Originally Posted by KYGlockster View Post
    The "unless prohibited by state or federal law" is where the restrictions come from. State law prohibits firearms in a great deal of places. "No firearm" signs have the force of law in Ohio. The carrying of firearms can be banned in government buildings. You can't carry without a license in your own vehicle or any other vehicle. Carry is banned in the state capitol and the state capitol grounds. Ohio considers an AR-15 and similiar weapons that are designed to accept a magazine of 30 rounds or more an "automatic weapon." In Ohio you must surrender your firearm (that you can't carry without a license) to any leo who asks you to do so, and so on.

    This is from the same statute you cited, and I believe it just adds to the restrictiveness of the laws of Ohio:
    (D) This section does not apply to either of the following:

    (1) A zoning ordinance that regulates or prohibits the commercial sale of firearms, firearm components, or ammunition for firearms in areas zoned for residential or agricultural uses;

    (2) A zoning ordinance that specifies the hours of operation or the geographic areas where the commercial sale of firearms, firearm components, or ammunition for firearms may occur, provided that the zoning ordinance is consistent with zoning ordinances for other retail establishments in the same geographic area and does not result in a de facto prohibition of the commercial sale of firearms, firearm components, or ammunition for firearms in areas zoned for commercial, retail, or industrial uses.


    With laws that are this restrictive, the preemption really isn't helping much. It keeps a local government from prohibiting your ability to carry in your vehicle (with a license of course), and on your own property, but not much else. State law already places a large amount of restrictions on carry and other aspects concerning firearms, and that is what I was implying.

    Here is a link to some of Ohio's firearm laws: http://codes.ohio.gov/nllxml/ohiocod...hapter2923.htm
    I stole this from an Ohio thread:

    http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/police/...F0/showMeta/0/
    3. LAW DEPARTMENT MEMO ON OPEN CARRY OF A FIREARM IN OHIO
    Ohio law permits the open carry of a firearm with few exceptions. Citizens mayopenly carry firearms in public places unless there is a specific prohibition againstcarrying a firearm in that place (police station, school safety zone, courthouse, etc.).Since
    Cleveland v. State of Ohio, 2010-Ohio-6318, regulation of the “ownership,possession, purchase, other acquisition, transport, storage, carrying, sale, or othertransfer of firearms, their components, and their ammunition” is only done by stateand federal law. Local municipal laws may only regulate the discharge of firearms.Therefore, officers should not charge individuals with violations of the CincinnatiMunicipal Code unless the ordinance deals with the discharge of a firearm.
    James E. Craig, Police Chief July 3, 2012
    3Many people worry when they see someone openly carrying a gun. Officers canexpect to receive calls when this happens. But, openly carrying a firearm, by itself, isnot illegal. The fact that someone has called 911 or flagged down an officer aboutseeing someone with a gun in public is probably not enough to support aninvestigative detention. In such situations, an officer must observe the subject andevaluate the totality of circumstances to determine whether reasonable suspicionexists to justify detaining the individual. If the individual is doing nothing else thatarouses suspicion, simply wearing a gun will not justify a detention.It is important to note, open carry by itself also would not support a charge ofDisorderly Conduct or Inducing Panic. There must be additional facts to supportthese offenses. If someone is lawfully carrying a firearm—and doing nothing else—the fact that it causes alarm to others does not support a charge.Equally important, before you charge someone with a violation of
    Ohio RevisedCode (ORC) 2921.29, Failure to Disclose Personal Information (also referred toas the “Stop and I.D.” law), you first must have reasonable suspicion that person has,is, or is about to commit a criminal offense. The “Stop and I.D.” law does not applyunless you already have a valid investigative detention of the person – and opencarry by itself is not enough. Citizens may ignore your request for information duringa consensual encounter, so you may only charge a citizen with a violation of ORC2921.29 when they are legally detained.Private businesses or property owners may prohibit all firearms on their property.They may post signs prohibiting firearms or they may order a person to leave forsuch behavior. Criminal Trespass is the appropriate charge if a person is on privateproperty in violation of such a prohibition.
    Last edited by hotrod; 08-30-2012 at 08:43 PM.
    Speed is fine
    Accuracy is final

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •