Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 36

Thread: Bull rushed by two Pitt-Bulls

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    40

    Bull rushed by two Pitt-Bulls

    Out walking with my daughter and my dog, a Golden, through my neighborhood this morning, when we were suddenly bull rushed by a pair of Pitts, coming through the fence from the house on my left... Growling and claws on pavement signaled impending doom, so I dropped the leash, swept up my daughter into my non-draw hand, as high as I could hold her, and swung around putting me between the dogs and my little girl. Turning around, my Golden had one of the dogs pinned, and the owner of the dogs came running around the corner, pulling the other dog away. My hand was on my .45 the whole time, ready. The guy grabbed his other dog from under mine, saying how they were really sweet, normally.

    About this time his eyes landed on the 1911 on my hip, and the apologies came flooding forth, trying to shake my hand, saying he was going to kennel his dogs from here on....I simply looked him in the eye and said "It could have been MUCH worse." Made sure my dog was okay, and moved on with my day. Almost filled his "sweet" dogs with holes...

    Closest I've ever been to drawing my Colt; the ol heart rate was moving along nicely....

    Head on a swivel out there folks, cheers....

  2. #2
    Regular Member DocWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Mountain Home, Idaho, USA
    Posts
    1,968
    I know what you mean, the only time I have ever had to draw my weapon (either service pistol or private) was in my front yard when a neighbors dog came charging at me barking and foaming at the mouth. My wifes cat was behind me but I thought he was coming at me so I drew my Tauras 45. Millienium and took it off safe. The dog was about 4 feet away when its owner yelled and came running making the dog stop. The dogs nose was about 3 feet from my barrel. Another second and the dog would have had a lead facial.

    Only time I have ever had to pull my pistol and that includes three wars and working as a Federal Security Officer for 4 years.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    CO
    Posts
    104
    Oh but I thought pitbulls were such friendly creatures that could never hurt anything. Every pit owner swears that they are just full of love....

    Say it isn't so....
    Last edited by Deserteagle8338; 08-30-2012 at 08:16 PM.

  4. #4
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Chesterfield, Va.
    Posts
    34,622
    Been told a million times before, "Don't exaggerate."

    If a charging pit (spelled with 1 "t") bull terrier is 3 feet from your muzzle and you haven't fired yet - guess what - you don't have time left to fire before he makes contact.

    At 30 mph that dog is going to cover the 3 ft. within .1467 seconds! Faster than you can react with time to stop him IMO. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_fast_does_a_pit-bull_run
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training.” Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  5. #5
    Regular Member WalkingWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    12,279
    Quote Originally Posted by Deserteagle8338 View Post
    Oh but I thought pitbulls were such friendly creatures that could never hurt anything. Every pit owner swears that they are just full of love....

    Say it isn't so....
    I was mauled by a border collie as a child, I don't think the breed matters. It just happens that pit bulls are a very popular breed.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    CO
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf View Post
    I was mauled by a border collie as a child, I don't think the breed matters. It just happens that pit bulls are a very popular breed.
    You are correct that any dog can attack you, but I would argue that pitbulls seem to attack innocent people more than other common breeds.

  7. #7
    Regular Member carolina guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    1,790
    A few years back, was walking my mother's dog in her backyard when one the neighbors dalmatians came bursting through the 8ft high hedge, charged, bit my mother's dog and turned on me. I suspect the roofing hammer (that I just happened to still have with me) caught his attention as I charged him--with full intent to kill-- and made the dog reverse course and plunge back in the next yard.

    Called the local PD and was told that perhaps animal control will be by sometime in the next few days. I informed the dispatcher that she could cancel the call...the dog (and others) had been doing this for a while, and I would be walking back in the yard again in a few with a .38 to "resolve the issue" if the dog came back. Was told by the dispatcher that "discharging a firearm in the city limits was illegal"...to which I replied "...except in a case of self defense". Hung up and went to wait on the driveway. Amazingly, within 3 minutes a sergeant with the PD arrived to investigate.

    Walked him back, showed him the yard with the 6 dalmatians who had been barking virtually non-stop for weeks, and terrorizing the area. He was skeptical until one of them charged him.

    2 days later, they were all in a kennel.
    Last edited by carolina guy; 08-31-2012 at 01:42 PM.
    If something is wrong for ONE person to do to another, it is still wrong if a BILLION people do it.

  8. #8
    Regular Member GTShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    111
    OHh man, that really sucks. AND YES! all Pitbull owners always say their Pitts are the sweatest..... I call BS on that

    I feel my questions is somewhat related to the thread so Ill post up.

    How true is it that you cannot discharge your firearm in your home? I was outside a couple of nights ago and a Coyoto ran passed me and my daughter not 5 feet away. Last night as I was working on a bicicle in the garage I saw a Skunk run out from my back yard, cross the street into my neighbors yard. Dont have a problem with animals in the area, but what happens if my child, wife or myself gets attacked by one and I fire my handgun, shotgun or rifle?

    My Sister in law (who lives with us) has told me for the past 3 nights she has heard animals fighting in the backyard.
    Last edited by GTShooter; 08-31-2012 at 12:35 PM.

  9. #9
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Chesterfield, Va.
    Posts
    34,622
    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf View Post
    I was mauled by a border collie as a child, I don't think the breed matters. It just happens that pit bulls are a very popular breed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Deserteagle8338 View Post
    You are correct that any dog can attack you, but I would argue that pitbulls seem to attack innocent people more than other common breeds.
    Would prefer to defend against a Chihuahua (high top boots work) than a large breed with speed and a powerful bite

    Have been bitten by a Scottish Terrier - worked for a vet as a teenager.

    By a miniature dachshund when I pulled him out from under a car after being hit....by his teeth.

    By a German Shepard on an employee's porch - dog was very territorial - clean puncture wound between thumb and index finger. (ouch!)

    Almost did a mag dump on a very large mixed breed that slipped his collar while being walked in a local park. He charged, barking and snarling from over a 150 ft away - was in a firing stance with finger tightening on the trigger before he finally responded to his master's frantic commands - distance(?) maybe 25-30 ft.

    Anything with teeth can hurt you if circumstances are right. I'll tell you about my squirrel bite one day and/or my mom's bat bite - we both had to have the anti-rabies shots.
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training.” Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  10. #10
    Regular Member carolina guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    1,790
    Quote Originally Posted by GTShooter View Post
    OHh man, that really sucks. AND YES! all Pitbull owners always say their Pitts are the sweatest..... I call BS on that

    I feel my questions is somewhat related to the thread so Ill post up.

    How true is it that you cannot discharge your firearm in your home? I was outside a couple of nights ago and a Coyoto ran passed me and my daughter not 5 feet away. Last night as I was working on a bicicle in the garage I saw a Skunk run out from my back yard, cross the street into my neighbors yard. Dont have a problem with animals in the area, but what happens if my child, wife or myself gets attacked by one and I fire my handgun, shotgun or rifle?

    My Sister in law (who lives with us) has told me for the past 3 nights she has heard animals fighting in the backyard.
    Not sure of the laws in CO...but from what I have seen...most laws/ordinances have a self-defense or "lawful" reason exemption built-in. Otherwise, they are legislating no self-defense. Just my $0.02...IANAL...

    Might want to check municode or amlegal for your local laws/ordinances.
    If something is wrong for ONE person to do to another, it is still wrong if a BILLION people do it.

  11. #11
    Regular Member DamonK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ft. Lewis, WA
    Posts
    585

    Re: Bull rushed by two Pitt-Bulls

    I've had to pull on dogs to, and I've owned and trained many different breeds of dogs for both hunting and as service animals. I can tell you from personal experience that human aggression (dogs being agressive towards humans) can be found in some breeds such as german shepards, rotts, or dobermans. How ever, the pitbull class (pitbull is a group not a breed) was bred to be very docile towards humans. When you find pits that show signs of human aggression, it is almost always due towards either training or neglect. People these days like to use pits as an attack dog due to 2 things, they look aggressive, and their high drive to please their master. That same drive is what makes them one of the best dogs for soldiers with PTSD. Let's stop the breed bashing and focus on the fact that the OP was able to maintain control of the situation without having to unholster his weapon, and no own was seriously injured.

    Also, as a side note, there is no such thing as a locking jaw in the canine kingdom, and while the small skull is an issue for some breeds, the pitbull group does not suffer from that issue. They are generally one of the healthier groups of dogs.

    Sent from my DROID4 using Tapatalk 2

  12. #12
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Chesterfield, Va.
    Posts
    34,622
    Quote Originally Posted by DamonK View Post
    --snipped--
    the pitbull class (pitbull is a group not a breed)
    Well, kinda, sorta so; but not in total.

    The term “Pit Bull” as used in these pages, is meant to refer to the American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) breed ONLY. This is a purebred
    recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) and the American Dog Breeders Association (ADBA). However, the media, legislators and others use this same term incorrectly to describe a certain group of dogs that actually includes several breeds and types. Included in this group are: American Pit Bull Terriers/American Staffordshire Terriers, and Staffordshire Bull Terriers, sometimes Bull Terriers and American Bulldogs, mixes with percentage of blood of any one of these breeds and dogs that simply look like these breeds.
    http://www.realpitbull.com/center.html
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training.” Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  13. #13
    Regular Member WalkingWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    12,279
    One of my neighbors has a pit bull, he is a very happy dog, and far from dangerous. I think a lot of people train pit bulls to be mean. I have owned a couple breeds claimed to be mean, I only had problem with one dog. He was dangerous to other people and we had him put down, it was a hard day and decision for both of us.

  14. #14
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Chesterfield, Va.
    Posts
    34,622
    Dog ownership brings with it responsibilities - not unlike gun ownership is it. [rhetorical]
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training.” Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  15. #15
    Regular Member MKEgal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    in front of my computer, WI
    Posts
    4,426
    Quote Originally Posted by carolina guy
    one the neighbors dalmatians came bursting through the 8ft high hedge, charged, bit my mother's dog and turned on me. I suspect the roofing hammer (that I just happened to still have with me) caught his attention as I charged him - with full intent to kill - and made the dog reverse course and plunge back in the next yard.
    I don't think the hammer itself had a thing to do with the dog going back where it should be.
    Your retaliatory attack, chasing him off, was probably full of body language that told the dog what you said here in words - if you caught him you'd kill him.
    Dogs understand that.
    He might have been hit before, & realized you had something to hit him with.

  16. #16
    Regular Member O2HeN2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf View Post
    It just happens that pit bulls are a very popular breed.
    The real problem is that pits are popular with a certian kind of owner. Not all owners, mind you, but many. Unfortunately, it's the breed that gets the bad rep.

    O2
    When seconds count, the police are mere minutes away...
    They'll never take your "hunting rifle", they'll call it a "sniper rifle" first.
    Zero failures comes at infinite cost.

  17. #17
    Regular Member rushcreek2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Colorado Springs. CO
    Posts
    924
    Dogs ARE sort of like guns. DOG CONTROL is the issue. Yes- Bull Terriers are really great dogs, and they love to play, but when they "go off" on some pet, or person - it ain't no joke.

    Interestingly, I have this theory that some "Pit Bull" owners have for one reason , or another opted for their pet rather than a firearm for homestead defense.

  18. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    40
    The funny thing was, both dogs we on leashes. Came through the fence, but nobody was holding the other end of the leash! I am really glad that I didn't have to pull my firearm, or shoot his dog, or dogs. It happened so fast though, I am much more aware that I was lucky, and that my dog probably saved us. Had it been only me and my daughter, I would have either had to shoot one of them, or they wouldn't have charged us. That's about all I can say about it.

    Just glad it didn't go down any other way...

  19. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    CO
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by Grapeshot View Post
    Would prefer to defend against a Chihuahua (high top boots work) than a large breed with speed and a powerful bite

    Have been bitten by a Scottish Terrier - worked for a vet as a teenager.

    By a miniature dachshund when I pulled him out from under a car after being hit....by his teeth.

    By a German Shepard on an employee's porch - dog was very territorial - clean puncture wound between thumb and index finger. (ouch!)

    Almost did a mag dump on a very large mixed breed that slipped his collar while being walked in a local park. He charged, barking and snarling from over a 150 ft away - was in a firing stance with finger tightening on the trigger before he finally responded to his master's frantic commands - distance(?) maybe 25-30 ft.

    Anything with teeth can hurt you if circumstances are right. I'll tell you about my squirrel bite one day and/or my mom's bat bite - we both had to have the anti-rabies shots.
    Since you worked for a vet, you are well aware that pitbulls attack humans more than any other breed, so this info from the CDC must not be a surprise.

    http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreation...ogbreeds-a.pdf


    Pitbulls take the lead for attacks:
    Pitbulls- 66
    Second place and significantly less, Rottweilers- 39
    Third place- German Sherpards, even lower- 17

  20. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    12
    Happy to hear that the OP didn't have to pull his firearm, and the dogs were (relatively) restrained.

    As the owner of a Rott, I know all about the bad stigma. I can't blame people for shooting a dog (even if its mine) if its out of control and barreling after you. Breed doesn't matter. Little dogs can do lots of damage too.

  21. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    1,187
    Quote Originally Posted by metronumic View Post
    Little dogs can do lots of damage too.
    Yeah, but they're harder to bullseye. Let's outlaw them instead.

  22. #22
    Regular Member mobiushky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Alaska (ex-Colorado)
    Posts
    840
    Quote Originally Posted by Deserteagle8338 View Post
    Since you worked for a vet, you are well aware that pitbulls attack humans more than any other breed, so this info from the CDC must not be a surprise.

    http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreation...ogbreeds-a.pdf


    Pitbulls take the lead for attacks:
    Pitbulls- 66
    Second place and significantly less, Rottweilers- 39
    Third place- German Sherpards, even lower- 17
    Read the first line under procedure: "We collected data from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)..." Credibility now equals zero. Sorry, HSUS=PETA. Period. They are one and the same. So right there you know the data is not exactly upstanding or factual.

    Second these are recorded fatalities that are blamed on dog bites. Not attacks. Obviously direct related fatalities are going to be attributed to larger dogs as it'd be tough to directly link a chihuahua to a fatality.

    It is a common misconception that pitbulls "attack more than any breed." But that's simply not true and impossible to prove. Fact is, there are more than 900,000 dog attacks every year that require medical attention. There were something like 33 fatalities linked to pitbulls last year. So where are the 899,967 other attacks in there? Fact is, people have been perpetuating myths about dogs for years and no one seems to want to learn the truth. Most dog bite attacks are by smaller dogs and are hardly worth rising to the "fatality" level. In fact, research is starting to show that there is no density of attack by any breed. The reason you hear about larger breeds is due to the amount of damage they can inflict.

    I owned a rottweiler. I have several friends who have them. I guarantee you more is attributable to the owner than the breed. Our dog trainer rescues boxers and uses them as hospital care dogs.

  23. #23
    Regular Member PikesPeakMtnMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    426
    When I was a package deliveryman I encountered dogs daily. I was always on my guard with a strange dog, and the owner's reassurances never were reassuring. They would always say "he doesn't bite" to which I would reply, "does he have teeth?" when they tell me yes then I'd say "then he can bite". The one that always got me was an owner that told me to "relax, because he only gets aggressive around strangers"...and just what am I to the dog, he doesn't recognize the uniform as making someone who isn't trespassing....
    One day your life is going to flash before your eyes, make it worth watching.

  24. #24
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    40
    I hate to pour gas on the flames, but I have personally worked in busiest ER in the State for the last ten years, and in MY PERSONAL experience seeing patients affected by dog bites, I'd say at least 75% were pitbulls and Rottweilers. People can find statistics to support whatever argument they choose, but this is what I've personally seen over a decade of work. I know that there are good dogs in these breeds, but I don't think that I would ever own one. There is a reason you never hear about the horrible Golden Retriever attack; it's because they virtually never happen. There's also a reason that most apartment complexes and renters ask if you have one of these types of breeds. Insurance companies do their research, and charge accordingly to an apartment complex or renter that would allow their tenants these dogs...

    It's true that the size of the dog has a lot to due with injury to the victim, and there's good reason to be cautious of German Shepards, and pretty much any unknown dog in general. As I said, I am glad that the incident didn't turn out any other way, I wouldn't have wanted to kill his dog, but I think that if the situation was any different, I would have ended up drawing and pulling the trigger. Not taking any chances with my little girl...

    Cheers

  25. #25
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    fl
    Posts
    1,835
    Quote Originally Posted by SpringsColt View Post
    I hate to pour gas on the flames, but I have personally worked in busiest ER in the State for the last ten years, and in MY PERSONAL experience seeing patients affected by dog bites, I'd say at least 75% were pitbulls and Rottweilers. People can find statistics to support whatever argument they choose, but this is what I've personally seen over a decade of work. I know that there are good dogs in these breeds, but I don't think that I would ever own one. There is a reason you never hear about the horrible Golden Retriever attack; it's because they virtually never happen. There's also a reason that most apartment complexes and renters ask if you have one of these types of breeds. Insurance companies do their research, and charge accordingly to an apartment complex or renter that would allow their tenants these dogs...

    It's true that the size of the dog has a lot to due with injury to the victim, and there's good reason to be cautious of German Shepards, and pretty much any unknown dog in general. As I said, I am glad that the incident didn't turn out any other way, I wouldn't have wanted to kill his dog, but I think that if the situation was any different, I would have ended up drawing and pulling the trigger. Not taking any chances with my little girl...

    Cheers

    Whether this or that type of dog "attacks" any one or not- the thing that is almost ALWAYS left out of the equation is what the "victim" did to get themselves bit. Most-not all-but most dogs are not likely to attack without any kind of warning 1st.
    Also, most dogs (and it is not even remotely specific to a particular breed vs another) are'nt any more likely to attack anyone than a human is, without some provokation or threat. The end.
    Folks are always quick to "omg he/she/I was just attacked'-yet you never hear any of these folks,or their next of kin, ever admit that they did this or that, or totally ignored all the growling and barking that proceeded the "attack" which got themselves bitten in the 1st place.Nooo that would be kind of...honest? wouldnt it?
    Stop, already, with the Pitbull mythology. It's nonsense.Unless bred and trained to be otherwise-and THAT is entirely on the owner- they are no more likely to harm you than a kitten.
    Are they capable of doing so? Sure. But there's a wide gap between capable, and inclined to do so.

    My Pit- i'd trust with any child, un-attended, anytime. She's so gentle with children-esp, my nephew, since the time of his birth.
    In fact, my nephew is the ONLY person who can walk her on a leash. WIth us, she drags and pulls and yanks like a wild beast- hand the leash to this kid, and she walks right along side, entirely under control-go figure.



    Now, would she likely fight to the death to PROTECT that child from someone. You better believe it. But beyond that? Wont even bark at you,normally.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •