Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: SB 785: Civil Liability & SB 786: Failure to Report Theft

  1. #1
    Regular Member TFred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Most historic town in, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    7,705

    SB 785: Civil Liability & SB 786: Failure to Report Theft

    Here they are:

    SB 785 Firearms; use in commission of crime, civil liability.

    Use of firearm in commission of crime; civil liability. Provides that a person may be held civilly liable for injury to the person or property of another or for wrongful death resulting from the use of a firearm in the commission of a crime if it can be shown by clear and convincing evidence that the firearm came into the possession of the person who committed the crime because of the failure of the civil defendant to adequately secure the firearm from theft or unauthorized possession.

    SB 786 Firearms, lost or stolen; failure to report, civil penalty.


    Lost or stolen firearms; failure to report; civil penalty. Creates a $250 civil penalty for the offense of failing to report to law enforcement that a firearm a person owns or lawfully possesses has been lost or stolen.



    Both referred to Courts of Justice.

    Courts of Justice: Norment (Chairman), Saslaw, Marsh, Howell, Lucas, Edwards, Puller, Obenshain, McDougle, McEachin, Stuart, Vogel, Stanley, Reeves, Garrett

    TFred

  2. #2
    Regular Member crazydude6030's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Fairfax, va
    Posts
    512

    Re: SB 785: Civil Liability & SB 786: Failure to Report Theft

    Quote Originally Posted by TFred View Post
    Use of firearm in commission of crime; civil liability. Provides that a person may be held civilly liable for injury to the person or property of another or for wrongful death resulting from the use of a firearm in the commission of a crime if it can be shown by clear and convincing evidence that the firearm came into the possession of the person who committed the crime because of the failure of the civil defendant to adequately secure the firearm from theft or unauthorized possession.
    So what if your forced to leave it in the car and its stolen? Seems this would be to easy for gun owners to be charged for actions of a criminal.

  3. #3
    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    13,580
    Quote Originally Posted by crazydude6030 View Post
    So what if your forced to leave it in the car and its stolen? Seems this would be to easy for gun owners to be charged for actions of a criminal.
    That's kinda the point.

  4. #4
    Regular Member 2a4all's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Newport News, VA, ,
    Posts
    1,586
    Quote Originally Posted by crazydude6030 View Post
    So what if your forced to leave it in the car and its stolen? Seems this would be to easy for gun owners to be charged for actions of a criminal.
    Hence the civil/criminal liability as motivation to report thefts. If something is stolen from a car, there would likely be damage resulting from the break-in. Would you report that to your insurance company? They'd likely ask if you filed a police report. They would ask if the car was locked, etc.

    I'd be furious if it happened to me, and you can bet I'd report it to the police. After all, I'd want my property back.
    A law-abiding citizen should be able to carry his personal protection firearm anywhere that an armed criminal might go.

    Member VCDL, NRA

  5. #5
    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    13,580
    Quote Originally Posted by 2a4all View Post
    I'd be furious if it happened to me, and you can bet I'd report it to the police. After all, I'd want my property back.
    That's not really the point. It's not a matter of what we would do, it's being told we have to do it.

    I always wore a seat belt...until they passed the seat belt laws. Haven't had one on since.

  6. #6
    Regular Member crazydude6030's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Fairfax, va
    Posts
    512

    Re: SB 785: Civil Liability & SB 786: Failure to Report Theft

    Quote Originally Posted by peter nap View Post
    That's not really the point. It's not a matter of what we would do, it's being told we have to do it.

    I always wore a seat belt...until they passed the seat belt laws. Haven't had one on since.
    Its not even about that. Its the wording I don't like all that much. Who is to define secure? It places that burden on gun owners over someone else committing a criminal act. I just picture places like Surry charging guns owners because their gun was stolen.

    Besides I can't think of to many people who wouldn't file a claim. Its a soft attack on gun owners from what I can tell.

    If this passes I may very well go on a boating trip this spring.

  7. #7
    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    13,580
    Quote Originally Posted by crazydude6030 View Post
    Its not even about that. Its the wording I don't like all that much. Who is to define secure? It places that burden on gun owners over someone else committing a criminal act. I just picture places like Surry charging guns owners because their gun was stolen.

    Besides I can't think of to many people who wouldn't file a claim. Its a soft attack on gun owners from what I can tell.

    If this passes I may very well go on a boating trip this spring.
    This isn't a new bill. It pops up every so often and never gets anywhere, so I doubt there's much to worry about.

    I don't have a dog in this. I don't own any guns.
    Last edited by peter nap; 12-21-2012 at 09:47 PM.

  8. #8
    Regular Member shadow247's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Hampton
    Posts
    19
    "adequately secure" - Is this defined in any statute as related to firearms? Without a clear definition of what constitutes a firearm being "adequately secured" it would be extremely difficult to enforce I would think.

    Example,
    I place my pistol in a biometric single pistol vault bolted to my bedside table. Is this adequate? A criminal could steal the table, crack the safe, and gain access to my pistol in a matter of hours, possibly before I was even able to report the theft. Would I be open to a civil suit under such a statute?

    I placed my pistol in my locked glove-box in my locked vehicle behind a locked gate. Is this secure enough?

    Any lock can be defeated with enough tools and time, so where do we draw the line as to what's "adequate" and "negligent?"

  9. #9
    Regular Member crazydude6030's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Fairfax, va
    Posts
    512

    Re: SB 785: Civil Liability & SB 786: Failure to Report Theft

    Quote Originally Posted by peter nap View Post
    This isn't a new bill. It pops up every so often and never gets anywhere, so I doubt there's much to worry about.

    I don't have a dog in this. I don't own any guns.
    From what I hear you just own small cannons

    Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

  10. #10
    Campaign Veteran Nelson_Muntz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    697
    automatically guilty. if it was "adequately secure" it couldn't be stolen.

  11. #11
    Regular Member TFred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Most historic town in, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    7,705
    Quote Originally Posted by Nelson_Muntz View Post
    automatically guilty. if it was "adequately secure" it couldn't be stolen.
    Exactly. This bill turns a crime victim into a criminal.

    TFred

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •