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Thread: 3D Printed AR15 Much Improved, More Reliable

  1. #1
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    3D Printed AR15 Much Improved, More Reliable

    Major improvements have been made in 3D printed AR15 rifles. The part of the rifle that is defined as a gun by federal law is the only part printed. The rest of the parts are commonly available on the free market.

    People have made guns at home since guns were invented in the 1500ís or before. However, the ability to print out your own AR15 lower receiver at home, without having to use steel files, a grinder, or other home workshop tools, has caught the attention of the public in this digital age.

    Defense Distributed is the organization that aims to make the promise of the Second Amendment a practical reality for everyman at the touch of a button. No longer will criminals in and out of government be able to be reasonably certain that their victims are unarmed.

    The first AR15 lower printed by Defense Distributed was matched to a barrel chambered for the 5.7x28 cartridge, a pistol/rifle round less powerful than the more common .223. It failed after six rounds.

    All of their design work and testing is now being done for and with the .223 cartridge. Several different printers and technologies have been tested. Stress analysis with sophisticated engineering design tools has been used to reduce the number of prototypes required. The lowers will now work reliably for 40-60 shots before failing. The highest round count so far has been over 80.

    The failures occur at the rear take down pins, through to the hand grip.

    Defense Distributed believes that their latest improvement will be reliable for 100 rounds. They expect to release the build files to the public in the next few weeks.

    They will dedicate it to Joe Biden and company.

    Dean Weingarten

    Pictures and link at the site:

    http://gunwatch.blogspot.com/2013/01...ade-in-3d.html

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    I think that all this effort is just an exercise in the capabilities of the machine.

    One can easily make a lower from a solid block using simple tools that many have at home.

    If they want to make a point that one cannot control the production of weapons then I guess they are free to do that and I would support such activities.

    Politicians who think that they can "ban" guns are deluding themselves and in fact, their efforts will just end up highlighting the ways of ignoring gun laws and show people (including criminals) how to get around such bans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ccwinstructor View Post
    ...The first AR15 lower printed by Defense Distributed was matched to a barrel chambered for the 5.7x28 cartridge, a pistol/rifle round less powerful than the more common .223. It failed after six rounds.

    All of their design work and testing is now being done for and with the .223 cartridge...
    Well, the 5.7x28mm uppers that I know of are blowback-operated. The .223 is gas-operated. Blowback is far more stressful to the lower. Even a .22 conversion kit puts more stress on the lower than the .223.
    "It's not important how many people I've killed. What's important is how I get along with the people who are still alive" - Jimmy the Tulip

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    Quote Originally Posted by davidmcbeth View Post
    I think that all this effort is just an exercise in the capabilities of the machine.

    One can easily make a lower from a solid block using simple tools that many have at home.s.


    One can do is right easily is another matter. I guess what one would define as easy and what simple tools.

    A milling machine and a lathe are not simple tools.

    Small hand held power tools and hand tools are simple how many hours are we taking to take a raw alum block to a finshed AR reciver. Let along trying it with a block of steel.

    I have done lots of hand tool work yes it can be done but it is time consuming.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firearms Iinstuctor View Post
    One can do is right easily is another matter. I guess what one would define as easy and what simple tools.

    A milling machine and a lathe are not simple tools.

    Small hand held power tools and hand tools are simple how many hours are we taking to take a raw alum block to a finshed AR reciver. Let along trying it with a block of steel.

    I have done lots of hand tool work yes it can be done but it is time consuming.
    Vids online showing aluminum lowers being made ... no lathe needed no milling machine ... drill press is all...

    I might give it a go ... see how hard it is....heck, only cost ya a block of Al ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by davidmcbeth View Post
    Vids online showing aluminum lowers being made ... no lathe needed no milling machine ... drill press is all...

    I might give it a go ... see how hard it is....heck, only cost ya a block of Al ...

    Go for it I would really like to hear the report. Keep a good log of your hours spent doing it. and then run a few hunreds of rounds through it for funtion.
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    When I did a google search I found lots of stuff on finshing a 80% receiver But thats a whole differant beast then a raw block of metal.
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    80% I do that. Not as hard as you think. I use a drill press and a dremmel for cleanup. Last build was an AR pistol. The one I am building now is an A2. It is a good feeling to work a weapon you built yourself. Not having any roll marks or ser #s is nice too.
    An 80% runs about US$150 a zero% (forging,no work done) runs US$50 The pleasure of firing a weapon that you built with your own hands...Priceless.
    "Firearms stand next in importance to the Constitution itself. They are the people's liberty teeth (and) keystone... the rifle and the pistol are equally indispensable... more than 99% of them by their silence indicate that they are in safe and sane hands. The very atmosphere of firearms everywhere restrains evil interference .When firearms go, all goes, we need them every hour." -- George Washington

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSG Laigaie View Post
    80% I do that. Not as hard as you think. I use a drill press and a dremmel for cleanup. Last build was an AR pistol. The one I am building now is an A2. It is a good feeling to work a weapon you built yourself. Not having any roll marks or ser #s is nice too.
    An 80% runs about US$150 a zero% (forging,no work done) runs US$50 The pleasure of firing a weapon that you built with your own hands...Priceless.
    I agree about the work on a 80% , but makeing one from a raw block of metal or even a a raw forgeing would be a differant story.
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    correct me if I'm wrong, but if it's 80% then it's not a "firearm" and therefor no FFL needed to purchase correct?

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    Re: 3D Printed AR15 Much Improved, More Reliable

    Quote Originally Posted by RockyMtnScotsman View Post
    correct me if I'm wrong, but if it's 80% then it's not a "firearm" and therefor no FFL needed to purchase correct?
    Correct

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    Quote Originally Posted by SPOProds View Post
    Correct
    interesting.....I knew if you started from scratch it wasn't but didn't know what the threshold of completion was to be considered a "firearm" .... thanks!
    Last edited by RockyMtnScotsman; 01-12-2013 at 12:03 PM.

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