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Thread: Disturbing the peace??

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    Disturbing the peace??

    I had a friend tell me that a rent a cop told them that a cop could charge them for OC under " Disturbing the peace". I see this alot on youtube... cops constantly telling people they are disturbing the peace. Is there any validity to this kind of threat?

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    Disturbing the peace??

    I'm no expert but I would assume if they are charging them with disturbing the peace they are also/ or just are being charged with that ever present ignorance known as GATTTOTP

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    Regular Member TFred's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KainVictus View Post
    I'm no expert but I would assume if they are charging them with disturbing the peace they are also/ or just are being charged with that ever present ignorance known as GATTTOTP
    GATTTOTP is a North Carolina issue, if I recall correctly. There is no such law in Virginia.

    Not to say that LEOs have and do charge people with fabricated violations. I would strongly suggest if such happens, that you immediately contact VCDL for referral to a competent gun-rights attorney. It happens, but we don't generally stand around and cry about it. More than one LE agency has had to pay significant sums of cash to rectify such kinds of shenanigans.

    TFred

    BTW: GATTTOTP = Going Armed To The Terror Of The Public.

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    Re: Disturbing the peace??

    Been doing it for more than a year, zero issues.

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    Public disturbance requires proof of an intentional act likely to incite a violent response. Here's one statute:
    18.2-416. Punishment for using abusive language to another.

    If any person shall, in the presence or hearing of another, curse or abuse such other person, or use any violent abusive language to such person concerning himself or any of his relations, or otherwise use such language, under circumstances reasonably calculated to provoke a breach of the peace, he shall be guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor.
    Last edited by user; 02-02-2013 at 09:30 PM. Reason: forgot about 18.2-914 - good work PaleRider116
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    Disturbing the peace??

    18.2-415. Disorderly conduct in public places.

    A person is guilty of disorderly conduct if, with the intent to cause public inconvenience, annoyance or alarm, or recklessly creating a risk thereof, he:

    A. In any street, highway, public building, or while in or on a public conveyance, or public place engages in conduct having a direct tendency to cause acts of violence by the person or persons at whom, individually, such conduct is directed; or

    B. Willfully or being intoxicated, whether willfully or not, and whether such intoxication results from self-administered alcohol or other drug of whatever nature, disrupts any funeral, memorial service, or meeting of the governing body of any political subdivision of this Commonwealth or a division or agency thereof, or of any school, literary society or place of religious worship, if the disruption (i) prevents or interferes with the orderly conduct of the funeral, memorial service, or meeting or (ii) has a direct tendency to cause acts of violence by the person or persons at whom, individually, the disruption is directed; or

    C. Willfully or while intoxicated, whether willfully or not, and whether such intoxication results from self-administered alcohol or other drug of whatever nature, disrupts the operation of any school or any activity conducted or sponsored by any school, if the disruption (i) prevents or interferes with the orderly conduct of the operation or activity or (ii) has a direct tendency to cause acts of violence by the person or persons at whom, individually, the disruption is directed.

    However, the conduct prohibited under subdivision A, B or C of this section shall not be deemed to include the utterance or display of any words or to include conduct otherwise made punishable under this title.

    The person in charge of any such building, place, conveyance, meeting, operation or activity may eject therefrom any person who violates any provision of this section, with the aid, if necessary, of any persons who may be called upon for such purpose.

    The governing bodies of counties, cities and towns are authorized to adopt ordinances prohibiting and punishing the acts and conduct prohibited by this section, provided that the punishment fixed therefor shall not exceed that prescribed for a Class 1 misdemeanor. A person violating any provision of this section shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by user View Post
    Not in Virginia. Public disturbance requires proof of an intentional act likely to incite a violent response. This statute is as close as we come:
    Dan, I appreciate all the help. I find it very amusing that you replied to this. When I moved to Virginia recently I googled " pro gun attorneys" in case I ever needed to contact an attorney with any self defense or open carry issues if one ever arised so I put your number in my phone. What are the odds?

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    Regular Member riverrat10k's Avatar
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    Just remember, an ill-informed or angry officer might charge you with anything he can come up with to subdue you. Many of us carry a voice recorder or have a phone with an app to record and maybe immediately upload all conversations.

    While you still may be arrested, you might also have good material for a defense and possible payday (don't mean to sound as if I am looking for a payday).

    Also a good idea to have enough cash or credit for bail set aside in case an overzealous LEO does arrest you for "contempt of cop".

    Question for User: can I bail myself out with my credit card?
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    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjakesnyder1988 View Post
    I had a friend tell me that a rent a cop told them that a cop could ....
    Third-hand information is to be distrusted unless a citation to statute/ordinance accompanies it and independent analysis of the citation confirms the proffered information.

    Very few "rentacops" are certified by DCJS as having passed the required training and are commissioned by their local Circuit Court to arrest with the same powers as a sworn LEO. The majority have a very limited statutory authority to execute a citizen's arrest in very limited and specific situations. That to explain that very few "rentacops" (Unarmed/Armed Security Officers) have any incentive to know what the law is.

    A LEO can do just about anything they want to, given that they have in their possession all sorts of implements of force and violence and most folks have been taught and currently beieve that fighting with a cop is both physically bad and will bring serious negative consequences ion the ensuing courtroom appearance. LEO are a special class that is not, by judicial standard, required to know what the law actually is. They can either violate the law or make up stuff out of thin air and get away with it if they can convince a judge they were acting "in good faith" - even when there have been repeated rulings that have become part of case law that clearly say they can not legally do that.

    You can be arrested, charged, and booked into custody for the alleged violation of of a law that doies not exist, and the only way you can get out of jail is by showing up in court and making a judge believe that the law used does not exist or does not apply to what you were alleged to have been doing that was supposed to be a violation of the law. Most often this is done at trial by an attorney. (If you prevail you may (but sometimes are not allowed to, and sometimes shown it is too costly in both time and finances) seek to recover damages and costs incurred.

    On the other hand, if you do not stand up to some JBT who feels the need to assert their "Authoritay" they get away with doing it tro you, and may feel like thewy can get away with doing it to anybody else.

    All of which is why, when a friend tells you that someone told them that ___, you should look them straight in the eyes and say "Prove it to me." (Regardless of the outcome someone is going to walk away knowing something they did not previously know.)

    stay safe.
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    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidmark View Post
    Third-hand information is to be distrusted unless a citation to statute/ordinance accompanies it and independent analysis of the citation confirms the proffered information.

    Very few "rentacops" are certified by DCJS as having passed the required training and are commissioned by their local Circuit Court to arrest with the same powers as a sworn LEO. The majority have a very limited statutory authority to execute a citizen's arrest in very limited and specific situations. That to explain that very few "rentacops" (Unarmed/Armed Security Officers) have any incentive to know what the law is.

    A LEO can do just about anything they want to, given that they have in their possession all sorts of implements of force and violence and most folks have been taught and currently beieve that fighting with a cop is both physically bad and will bring serious negative consequences ion the ensuing courtroom appearance. LEO are a special class that is not, by judicial standard, required to know what the law actually is. They can either violate the law or make up stuff out of thin air and get away with it if they can convince a judge they were acting "in good faith" - even when there have been repeated rulings that have become part of case law that clearly say they can not legally do that.

    You can be arrested, charged, and booked into custody for the alleged violation of of a law that doies not exist, and the only way you can get out of jail is by showing up in court and making a judge believe that the law used does not exist or does not apply to what you were alleged to have been doing that was supposed to be a violation of the law. Most often this is done at trial by an attorney. (If you prevail you may (but sometimes are not allowed to, and sometimes shown it is too costly in both time and finances) seek to recover damages and costs incurred.

    On the other hand, if you do not stand up to some JBT who feels the need to assert their "Authoritay" they get away with doing it tro you, and may feel like thewy can get away with doing it to anybody else.

    All of which is why, when a friend tells you that someone told them that ___, you should look them straight in the eyes and say "Prove it to me." (Regardless of the outcome someone is going to walk away knowing something they did not previously know.)

    stay safe.
    And that Ladies and Gentlemen, is the voice of experience and should be taken very seriously!!!

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    Regular Member 2a4all's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by palerider116 View Post
    18.2-415. Disorderly conduct in public places.

    A person is guilty of disorderly conduct if, with the intent to cause public inconvenience, annoyance or alarm, or recklessly creating a risk thereof, he:

    A. In any street, highway, public building, or while in or on a public conveyance, or public place engages in conduct having a direct tendency to cause acts of violence by the person or persons at whom, individually, such conduct is directed; or

    ...[Snip]...

    The governing bodies of counties, cities and towns are authorized to adopt ordinances prohibiting and punishing the acts and conduct prohibited by this section, provided that the punishment fixed therefor shall not exceed that prescribed for a Class 1 misdemeanor. A person violating any provision of this section shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.
    State Code may not be very specific about "Disorderly Conduct" or "Disturbing the Peace", both of which can mean different things are tolerated in one jurisdiction (or part of one) but not in another. For example, "loitering" or "panhandling" might be illegal by local ordinance in the business district during the day, but only at night in a public park which closes at dusk, or at a bus stop after the buses stop running for the day. Arresting and prosecuting a homeless person isn't beneficial financially as a local ordinance violation, since they locality has to foot the expenses, so it's sometimes preferable to bring charges under state code, as the costs are passed on to the commonwealth. Homeless people usually lack the resources to pay fines which would credit to the locality if charged under local ordinance. Fortunately, state preemption laws offer some protection for firearms violations charges. But then, be careful how you emphasize what you say...
    Last edited by 2a4all; 02-01-2013 at 11:49 PM.
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    Disturbing the peace??

    Actually, all security is required to be DCJS certified, whether armed or unarmed. A temporary exemption can be granted for emergency circumstances.

    9.1-139. Licensing, certification, and registration required; qualifications; temporary licenses.

    http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp...9.1-139+501828

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2a4all View Post
    .... Arresting and prosecuting a homeless person isn't beneficial financially as a local ordinance violation, since they locality has to foot the expenses, so it's sometimes preferable to bring charges under state code, as the costs are passed on to the commonwealth ....
    I beg your pardon? [/church lady voice]

    Being charged under local ordinance or under state law determines who bears the costs? Since when? You absolutely must provide a citation for that assertion.

    Sorry for the thread drift, but that cannot be allowed to go any farther until it is cleared up.

    stay safe.
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    Regular Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by user View Post
    Not in Virginia. Public disturbance requires proof of an intentional act likely to incite a violent response. This statute is as close as we come:
    So with that cite of Virginia law in mind, that would seem to indicate that if an out of control LEO used foul language directed towards a citizen he has detained, then the LEO would be guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor. Right?
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    Sorry palerider116...,

    Quote Originally Posted by palerider116 View Post
    Actually, all security is required to be DCJS certified, whether armed or unarmed. A temporary exemption can be granted for emergency circumstances.

    9.1-139. Licensing, certification, and registration required; qualifications; temporary licenses.

    http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp...9.1-139+501828
    As much as I enjoy your many posts and usually wholeheartedly agree with them, your statement that "all security is required to be DCJS certified, armed or unarmed." is not accurate. "In-house" Security has no such requirement. I can't give you a cite because much like there being no law that says open carry is legal, "In-house" Security isn't addressed, only certain types of security such as contract security or "for hire" Security are addressed by the state.

    You might be surprised to know that there are state Security Officers who have been armed and had no DCJS certification at all. Then again, maybe you wouldn't.

    For anyone wondering, "In-house" Security would be for instance Hospital Security, Bank Security, etc. where the Security employees work solely for the Company and their services are not leased or contracted out to another entity. Wachovia, Central Fidelity, had their own "In-house" Security, including armored cars for currency transport, all with out a single requirement from DCJS.

    While not always required, DCJS training is a great asset to anyone considering such employment, and training schools such as Security Operations Services is a great place to learn. I highly recommend the training and the school! It has the purpose and potential to save us all a lot of grief.

    To the casual observer, Security and Law Enforcement might seem closely related, but the experienced know, they do and are to conduct business in fairly different manners.

    sidestreet

    Jeremiah 29 v. 11-13

    we are not equal, we will never be equal, but we must be relentless.

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    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sidestreet View Post
    As much as I enjoy your many posts and usually wholeheartedly agree with them, your statement that "all security is required to be DCJS certified, armed or unarmed." is not accurate. "In-house" Security has no such requirement. I can't give you a cite because much like there being no law that says open carry is legal, "In-house" Security isn't addressed, only certain types of security such as contract security or "for hire" Security are addressed by the state.

    You might be surprised to know that there are state Security Officers who have been armed and had no DCJS certification at all. Then again, maybe you wouldn't.

    For anyone wondering, "In-house" Security would be for instance Hospital Security, Bank Security, etc. where the Security employees work solely for the Company and their services are not leased or contracted out to another entity. Wachovia, Central Fidelity, had their own "In-house" Security, including armored cars for currency transport, all with out a single requirement from DCJS.

    While not always required, DCJS training is a great asset to anyone considering such employment, and training schools such as Security Operations Services is a great place to learn. I highly recommend the training and the school! It has the purpose and potential to save us all a lot of grief.

    To the casual observer, Security and Law Enforcement might seem closely related, but the experienced know, they do and are to conduct business in fairly different manners.

    sidestreet

    Jeremiah 29 v. 11-13

    we are not equal, we will never be equal, but we must be relentless.
    I knew that Sidestreet but I was always under the impression that in house security had to be unarmed.
    It appears that is not so. Learn something new every day.

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    Wewll said, but

    Quote Originally Posted by sidestreet View Post
    As much as I enjoy your many posts and usually wholeheartedly agree with them, your statement that "all security is required to be DCJS certified, armed or unarmed." is not accurate. "In-house" Security has no such requirement. I can't give you a cite because much like there being no law that says open carry is legal, "In-house" Security isn't addressed, only certain types of security such as contract security or "for hire" Security are addressed by the state.

    You might be surprised to know that there are state Security Officers who have been armed and had no DCJS certification at all. Then again, maybe you wouldn't.

    For anyone wondering, "In-house" Security would be for instance Hospital Security, Bank Security, etc. where the Security employees work solely for the Company and their services are not leased or contracted out to another entity. Wachovia, Central Fidelity, had their own "In-house" Security, including armored cars for currency transport, all with out a single requirement from DCJS.

    While not always required, DCJS training is a great asset to anyone considering such employment, and training schools such as Security Operations Services is a great place to learn. I highly recommend the training and the school! It has the purpose and potential to save us all a lot of grief.

    To the casual observer, Security and Law Enforcement might seem closely related, but the experienced know, they do and are to conduct business in fairly different manners.

    sidestreet

    Jeremiah 29 v. 11-13

    we are not equal, we will never be equal, but we must be relentless.
    the differences between well trained security and LEOs is substantial. LEOs arrive after the fact and attempt to solve the crime. Security is generally on site to prevent an incident. Most LEO's don't know squat about security, locks, lighting, pass codes, perimeters, CCTV systems, Fire Control systems, access control.....the list goes on and on.

    I doubt there are many LEOs that have 1/10 the training I do in how to protect assets, (People, buildings and inventory) but 99% of them treat me like a second class citizen when they show up.

    Sadly, many don't even understand the laws they are sworn to enforce.
    Last edited by va_tazdad; 02-02-2013 at 09:10 AM.

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    Regular Member 2a4all's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidmark View Post
    I beg your pardon? [/church lady voice]

    Being charged under local ordinance or under state law determines who bears the costs? Since when? You absolutely must provide a citation for that assertion.

    Sorry for the thread drift, but that cannot be allowed to go any farther until it is cleared up.

    stay safe.
    Found that out from Sheriff Danny Diggs, York County. If they charge a person under County Code, and that person requires a public defender, and/or is convicted and incarcerated, the County bears the cost. If charges under State Code, the Commonwealth bears the cost. Of course, the charging entity gets to collect any fines assessed.
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    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2a4all View Post
    Found that out from Sheriff Danny Diggs, York County. If they charge a person under County Code, and that person requires a public defender, and/or is convicted and incarcerated, the County bears the cost. If charges under State Code, the Commonwealth bears the cost. Of course, the charging entity gets to collect any fines assessed.
    Knowing Sheriff Diggs and his knowledge/understanding of the law, I believe you misunderstood him.

    Further, saying you heard it (from Sheriff Diggs, me, User, Chuluthlu or The Great Flying Spaghetti Monster himself) is not a valid cite. Where in the Code of Virginia of 1950, as Amended, or the Virginia Administrative Code is it spelled out? I have no problem sitting here all weekend and all next week (or longer) while you either ask Sheriff Diggs for clarificatiuon and explanation or do your own legal research.

    Quite frankly, I am disappointed that you would pull a "the cousin of the ex-boyfriend of the hairdresser of the mayor's secretary's babysitter's ..." as a citation. Shortening it to "Sheriff Diggs told me" still does not cut it.

    stay safe.
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidmark View Post
    Knowing Sheriff Diggs and his knowledge/understanding of the law, I believe you misunderstood him.

    Further, saying you heard it (from Sheriff Diggs, me, User, Chuluthlu or The Great Flying Spaghetti Monster himself) is not a valid cite. Where in the Code of Virginia of 1950, as Amended, or the Virginia Administrative Code is it spelled out? I have no problem sitting here all weekend and all next week (or longer) while you either ask Sheriff Diggs for clarificatiuon and explanation or do your own legal research.

    Quite frankly, I am disappointed that you would pull a "the cousin of the ex-boyfriend of the hairdresser of the mayor's secretary's babysitter's ..." as a citation. Shortening it to "Sheriff Diggs told me" still does not cut it.

    stay safe.
    He said this to the York County Board of Supervisors when explaining why his office would charge someone for an offense under state code vs local county code. Hardly a misunderstanding. I'm sure if you asked him, he'd explain it to you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernBoy View Post
    So with that cite of Virginia law in mind, that would seem to indicate that if an out of control LEO used foul language directed towards a citizen he has detained, then the LEO would be guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor. Right?
    Correct. Usually, though, just plain folks who get worked up in a predictable reaction when the cops poke their buttons use colorful language, which then justifies detention.

    I was wrong in my earlier post, btw, PaleRider116 caught it.
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    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by user View Post
    Correct. Usually, though, just plain folks who get worked up in a predictable reaction when the cops poke their buttons use colorful language, which then justifies detention.
    .
    That is where the valuable "To any officer" letter is extremely valuable.

    I have used it twice now and as a master of colorful language, it has been refreshing to just shut up and ignore them.

    Talk about pushing buttons!

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    [QUOTE=skidmark;1891487]Third-hand information is to be distrusted unless a citation to statute/ordinance accompanies it and independent analysis of the citation confirms the proffered information.
    Very few "rentacops" are certified by DCJS as having passed the required training and are commissioned by their local Circuit Court to arrest with the same powers as a sworn LEO. The majority have a very limited statutory authority to execute a citizen's arrest in very limited and specific situations. That to explain that very few "rentacops" (Unarmed/Armed Security Officers) have any incentive to know what the law is.
    Skidmark all armed security officers have the same authority of law enforcement when on the property they are hired to secure VA code 9.1-146 A registered armed security officer of a private security services business while at a location which the business is contracted to protect shall have the power to effect an arrest for an offense occurring (i) in his presence on such premises or (ii) in the presence of a merchant, agent, or employee of the merchant the private security business has contracted to protect, if the merchant, agent, or employee had probable cause to believe that the person arrested had shoplifted or committed willful concealment of goods as contemplated by 18.2-106. For the purposes of 19.2-74, a registered armed security officer of a private security services business shall be considered an arresting officer.

    and please note the term rentacop is quite offensive to those of us that take our job seriously and do study the law myself included with that being said I do understand that there are some that just want the power without putting in the work I spend a lot of time studying law reviewing police procedure and policy and encourage other officers to do the same because we are not exempt from legal action if were wrong Anyway be careful telling people that security officers dont have authority I issue summons and effect arrests fairly often while on duty at the properties I work and take people to jail as well (same as pd) the difference is my authority is limited to a property and pd authority is limited to a city or town

    As to the disturbing the peace issue I have seen people arrested for dtp for simply open carrying because someone complained you have to remember there is letter of the law and there is color of the law I think dtp requires an action or deliberate act to insight others BUT if you rub an officer pd or security the wrong way the might use dtp as a reason to hold you and you have a uphill battle from there for sure because if it gets to court the officer will talk about how you were non compliant loud and difficult and carrying a gun scarring people etc and all hes doing is building the mental image that you are a raving lunatic and he gets to talk first so the deck is stacked against you before you ever open your mouth Im in court a few times a month I see it happen a lot

    notice non compliant loud difficult and carrying a gun NONE of these things on there own are a crime but the mental picture drawn by using these words makes it look like you might be committing a crime Im glad I live in a town where open carry is largely accepted and understood and the odds of having this problem are pretty slim

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    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    mbhudson -

    First, let me apologize for repeating the use of "rentacop" - it was wrong to use it just becase a previous poster had used it.

    Second, 9.1-146 gives the power to arrest for shoplifting/willful concealment and nothing else. There are all sort of traps and pitfalls facing the Registered Armed Security Officer effecting such an arrest, beginning with either writing out a valid, lawful summons on which to release the person, as the arrestee can only be brought before a magistrate if they refuse to accept the summons or indicate they will not appear in court based on the summons notification. Pleasse tell me how you got the Virginia General Services Administration to issue you a Virginia Uiversal Summons booklet. Then tell me how you get the General District Court to assign you "court days" so that you can enter the appropriate date on the summons. Then tell me how you transport your arrestee to the local jail without running afould of 8.01-226.9 http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp...cod+8.01-226.9

    Third, having gotten past all that, please tell me how you believe a Registered Armed Security Officer can effect an arrest for anything besides shoplifting/willful concealment.
    Anyway be careful telling people that security officers dont have authority I issue summons and effect arrests fairly often while on duty at the properties I work and take people to jail as well (same as pd) the difference is my authority is limited to a property
    I would especially like to read how you believe a Registered Armed Security Officer could arrest for trespass, as that seems to be claimed very often. And since "disturbing the peace" is neither a crime under the Code of Virginia nor the Virginia Administrative Code, please do tell me how anybody can be arrested for disturbing the peace. (No fair saying I can get cuffed & stuffed on a false charge and later win i both criminal and civil court. An "arrest" is a lawful act. Everything else is some version of improper detention/kidnapping.)

    Or are you a Special Conservator of the Peace? http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp...00+cod+19.2-13 Within the boundaries of theoir commision they are law enforcement officers, as opposed to Security Officers.

    The order of appointment may provide that a special conservator of the peace shall have all the powers, functions, duties, responsibilities and authority of any other conservator of the peace within such geographical limitations as the court may deem appropriate within the confines of the county, city or town that makes application or within the county, city or town where the corporate applicant is located, limited, except as provided in subsection E, to the judicial circuit wherein application has been made, whenever such special conservator of the peace is engaged in the performance of his duties as such. The order may also provide that the special conservator of the peace is a "law-enforcement officer" for the purposes of Article 4 ( 37.2-808 et seq.) of Chapter 8 of Title 37.2, or Article 16 ( 16.1-335 et seq.) of Chapter 11 of Title 16.1. The order may also provide that the special conservator of the peace is authorized to use the seal of the Commonwealth in a badge or other credential of office as the court may deem appropriate. The order may also provide that the special conservator of the peace may use the title "police" on any badge or uniform worn in the performance of his duties as such. The order may also provide that a special conservator of the peace who has completed the minimum training standards established by the Department of Criminal Justice Services, has the authority to affect arrests, using up to the same amount of force as would be allowed to a law-enforcement officer employed by the Commonwealth or any of its political subdivisions when making a lawful arrest. [emphasis added]
    Yes, "contempt of cop" seems to be a rather prevalent charge under which folks wind up believing they have been arrested - even if the cop/Registered Armed Security Officer uses some existing portion of the Code of Virginia/Virginia Administrative Code as the basis for the arrest.

    This thread started with a question about whether or not a person (in Virginia) could be arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace merely because the person was OCing. We have expanded that to discuss the fact that "disturbing the peace" does not exist as a criminal offense regardless of the armed status of the person being arrested.

    stay safe.
    Last edited by skidmark; 02-02-2013 at 11:10 PM. Reason: dropped a paragraph
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  25. #25
    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
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    MB, you're fairly new here so let me tell you that this has been hashed out many times before.

    You cited a section of the code that only Codifies the arrest powers every citizen of Virginia has, plus allows a detention of shoplifters, etc and allows you to put your name in as the arresting officer.
    That's mostly because a Police Officer won't make an arrest without personal knowledge.

    There's no reason to go over that again.
    .
    Skidmark meant no offence. He's been on that side of the yard before. He's had experience as both a State Employee and in the private sector ...and is usually accurate in what he says to the point of being frightening.

    There is a difference between a Security Guard and a Security Officer. The title is earned, not granted. Two Security Officers have been on this thread and commented. They don't beat their chest or try to convince people they're close quarter cops. They do a job most cops can't do and know it and both are perfectly happy, well adjusted, likable people, as are all Security Officers I know.

    This thread is about disturbing the peace....let's try to keep on that subject please (Notice I said........ the Magic Word)

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