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Thread: Glock Trigger Add On

  1. #1
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    Glock Trigger Add On

    My primary carry weapon is a Glock 21. I am not a big fan of the triggers though. When I was looking at getting a trigger job, I was told that the Ghost Disconnect would make the trigger less "mushy." Does anyone have any experience with changing the disconnects? If so, do you have a praticular brand that you like better?

    Also, I have read some things about replacing the trigger spring with a competition spring, any thoughts?

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    i always use glock parts

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    Regular Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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    I have quite a bit of experience with my Glocks and aftermarket parts. Before you start any modifications, make sure you take the time and view videos on youtube which detail how to do any of this. Buy a good book on Glock, their detailed disassembly, terminology, parts descriptions, and a lot of other valuable information. Glocks are among the easiest semi-automatic pistols to work on so take your time and learn as much as you can before jumping in. With that said, here's some information to get you started.

    For my primary carry gun, a gen3 Glock 23, I have tested five different 3.5 "connectors" (they're not called disconnectors): Glock(2), Ghost, LWD, and Scherer. For my purposes, I like the Glock 3.5 connector (part #00135) the best overall. You can get this connector at GlockParts.com. I found it to have the best general feel, reset, and break. Of course like anything of this nature, this is very subjective. I have this connector in four of my Glocks which are also ones I do or would carry. Here are the modifications I have made to the three gen3 Glocks that I keep in my carry/SD stable;

    • Glock 3.5 connector (part #00135)

    • Glock smooth faced trigger.

    • GlockParts.com 6 pound trigger spring

    • The 25 cent trigger job

    • Trijicon night sights (GL01)


    Your question, "Also, I have read some things about replacing the trigger spring with a competition spring, any thoughts?" was answered above. I like the GlockParts.com 6 pound trigger spring. I have also tried the Wolf 6 pound trigger spring and found the GlockParts spring to be better. The heavier trigger spring returns a lighter trigger pull weight (I know, doesn't make sense but that's how it works - learn the Glock trigger). When used in concert with the other mods I outlined, you get a very nice Glock trigger that is not too light for carry purposes. Some will disagree with this and that is fine. But as I said, modifications are a very subjective matter and what I have done works best for me.

    These modifications result in a digitally measured 5 pound trigger pull with a nice break, excellent felt and audible reset, and a smooth feeling pre-travel. Personally, this is as far as I would want to go for a carry sidearm.
    Last edited by SouthernBoy; 03-01-2013 at 07:37 AM.
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    Glock "-" connector, DIY polishing

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    Regular Member Michigander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt2636 View Post
    just shoot the thing it wont be as mushy. i promise.

    Indeed. Working the trigger with dry firing or shooting it will clean it up, as will a 25 cent trigger job.

    I'm not a huge fan of the Glock trigger as compared to some others when it comes to plinking, but if you have one which is broken in, and make full advantage of the very short reset, the trigger is considerably better than most. For a competition gun, tweaking it may be useful. For a carry gun, it's probably not so relevant, because the trigger pull, assuming your hand(s) fit the frame, will not be any sort of weak link in combative accuracy.

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    Regular Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michigander View Post
    Indeed. Working the trigger with dry firing or shooting it will clean it up, as will a 25 cent trigger job.

    I'm not a huge fan of the Glock trigger as compared to some others when it comes to plinking, but if you have one which is broken in, and make full advantage of the very short reset, the trigger is considerably better than most. For a competition gun, tweaking it may be useful. For a carry gun, it's probably not so relevant, because the trigger pull, assuming your hand(s) fit the frame, will not be any sort of weak link in combative accuracy.
    The most common reason that people give for modifying their Glock triggers is to improve accuracy. While regular training can improve this on its own, for most an improved trigger does help their hit potential. The offset to this some folks will argue is an increased probability of accidental discharges. I don't have the stats on this, but from my own experience, training with the triggers I have on my carry Glocks has worked for me in the accuracy category as well as the general feel of the gun.

    One thing I do like about the Glock 2-stage trigger is the totally distinct difference in feel between the pre-travel and the "wall" you hit at the start of the second stage. Enough and consistent training, to include copious amounts of dry firing, goes a very long way for me in the familiarization of this weapons system. I once had my primary carry Glock down to a 3 1/2 pound trigger. I didn't like it and certainly not for carry work. I didn't do this... a gunsmith did it contrary to my wishes. I would definitely not have carried that gun in that configuration.

    There is nothing mushy or non-distinct in the triggers of my carry Glocks. They are all fine in their current setup for my purposes. And they work.
    In the final seconds of your life, just before your killer is about to dispatch you to that great eternal darkness, what would you rather have in your hand? A cell phone or a gun?

    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt2636 View Post
    21 owner myself. just shoot the thing it wont be as mushy. i promise.
    Another G21 owner here...I agree.

  8. #8
    Regular Member Michigander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doughnutman View Post
    Another G21 owner here...I agree.
    One way you can do it, with no mechanical inclination at alland very little time, is to make sure the gun is clear, go to a room with no ammo and no magazines in it, point in a safe direction, and rack and dry fire it several thousand times. This works well with not only Glocks, but most any other trigger than needs a break in too. Did this with a brand new M&P not too long ago.

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    Regular Member ron73440's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michigander View Post
    One way you can do it, with no mechanical inclination at alland very little time, is to make sure the gun is clear, go to a room with no ammo and no magazines in it, point in a safe direction, and rack and dry fire it several thousand times. This works well with not only Glocks, but most any other trigger than needs a break in too. Did this with a brand new M&P not too long ago.
    I've always been told that dry firing a pistol was bad for it. My Dad used to always say this, but he was always a rifle guy and never actually owned a pistol.

    I got my first pistol experience in the Marines and one instructor said the same thing, although when I became a pistol instructor, none of the instructor trainers said anything about it.

    Any clarification?
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  10. #10
    Regular Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ron73440 View Post
    I've always been told that dry firing a pistol was bad for it. My Dad used to always say this, but he was always a rifle guy and never actually owned a pistol.

    I got my first pistol experience in the Marines and one instructor said the same thing, although when I became a pistol instructor, none of the instructor trainers said anything about it.

    Any clarification?
    Those are very general statements. For example, which pistol was the Marine instructor speaking about? What sort of action did it have? Hammer or striker fired? You see, there are many possibilities so a blanket statement about dry firing doesn't fit all molds.

    In terms of a Glock, dry firing is fine. If you are really concerned about this, get some snap caps and use them. As for modifications, I wrote something about this for Glocks recently on another gun website. You might find it helpful.

    -------------------------------

    The best advice to come out of this video is to do what works best for you, not what others may use or try to convince you to use. I would add to this my own advice which is...

    Ignore people on websites that tell you to leave the gun alone; that it is fine as is and was not meant to be modified. Conversely, I would also suggest that you ignore those who go into some length trying to convince you to do so much as to nearly remake the gun. And when I say ignore, what I mean is while it is fine to read what they have to say, keep in mind that what you may decide to do is totally up to you and no one else.

    Everyone has their own requirements, ideas, opinions, experience, and criteria when it comes to embracing a firearm and using it for whatever reason; target, self defense, or both. So listen if you will to those who offer good and honest information which falls within the framework of teaching you what you may not know or may wish to consider. This is all well and good. But do keep in mind that when all is said and done, it is YOU who has to live with your gun and any modifications made to it.

    Now with that all said, some modifications are pretty much a given with some guns and Glock is no exception to this. Two of these were pointed out in this video: the grip plug and after market sights. Any Glock will benefit from both of these changes. I would suggest that while the plug can be installed without any hesitation right away, new sights should wait until the owner of the gun has enough range time so that he can take a qualified and proper decision as to which sights will serve him best and why. What his sight requirements are and that is only going to come out after shooting the gun a bit under varying distances and conditions.

    You may not know what you're looking for in after market sights even after some range time until you can specifically point out the reasons you want to upgrade. I found this to be true. And you can go through several sets of sights before you find ones that are best for your needs. I also know this to be true from my own experience.

    Grip texturing, trigger mods, recoil springs, striker springs, safety blocks, barrels and more are all things best left to wait until you are familiar with your gun and can give real reasons for making changes. And how the gun is going to be used will affect your decisions. Target, self defense, or both will carry weight to any modifications you make.

    Now at the beginning I mentioned to ignore some suggestions and comments from people on the web and that includes those from myself. I would hope you come away after reading this with one thought. That you give it a little time and a chance, you and your gun, before you jump into mods. If for no other reason, do this so that you will actually know how and why you are going to modify your gun.

    There is nothing wrong with making modifications that help you be a better shooter. Just make sure those modifications you make serve your needs as best they can.


    -------------------------------------------------


    Here's a link to the video mentioned in the above.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7ViI...layer_embedded

    I can't comment enough that you should do what you believe to be best for your specific wants, needs, and requirements. I would only add to that to do so after research and involved consideration.
    In the final seconds of your life, just before your killer is about to dispatch you to that great eternal darkness, what would you rather have in your hand? A cell phone or a gun?

    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

    America First!

  11. #11
    Regular Member HearseGuy's Avatar
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    Dry firing a Glock will never hurt it. Intact, dry firing is is REQUIRED to remove the slide from a Glock.

    I do dry fire practices as well. When your practicing dry with no one around and no gun fire, you can really concentrate on your trigger pull. You can really see that front sight move if your not pulling smooth.
    Additional text for your reading pleasure...

  12. #12
    Regular Member Michigander's Avatar
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    The decision to mod or not to mod a glock is indeed an individual choice based on preference, but the point I feel is important is that the stock trigger pull, assuming the grip is properly fit to the shooter, is that the stock trigger is no weak link in accuracy for defensive shooting. Given the ultra tight grip used in combative shooting, and close range and distinct unlikelihood of using the sights means that the reasonable trigger weight and short reset are beyond sufficient.

    When you get into recreational/competitive target shooting and hunting, or just hobby tinkering, the trigger mods can be more fun and even useful, and I'm not knocking the practice for those kinds of needs/wants, just saying that tweaking the trigger pull shouldn't be thought of as too important for carry, because I don't believe it is.
    Last edited by Michigander; 03-24-2013 at 02:21 PM.

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