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Thread: Need a volunteer sign language translator for a Utah permit class.

  1. #1
    Regular Member ProShooter's Avatar
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    Need a volunteer sign language translator for a Utah permit class.

    We have a student that would like to attend our Utah permit class, but they are deaf and mute. Do we have anyone among our group here that can do sign language and would be willing to volunteer to translate for this student? If the volunteer wishes, we would be happy to let them take the class as well to obtain their Utah permit in exchange for this service. Please reply here or contact our office at 804-282-0214 if you think that you can help.

    Thanks,
    Jim Reynolds
    James Reynolds

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  2. #2
    Regular Member scouser's Avatar
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    Jim,

    My wife has a friend who knows someone that might be interested. Passed your number on to them to contact you, all I know is that their name is Donna

  3. #3
    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Sent to another possible.

    stay safe.
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

    Because stupidity isn't a race, and everybody can win.

    "No matter how much contempt you have for the media in all this, you don't have enough"
    ----Allahpundit

  4. #4
    Regular Member ProShooter's Avatar
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    I have a name that several people suggested. I have a call scheduled for this morning to see if we can work something out. Thanks to everyone who replied. I'll keep you updated.
    James Reynolds

    NRA Certified Firearms Instructor - Pistol, Shotgun, Home Firearms Safety, Refuse To Be A Victim
    Concealed Firearms Instructor for Virginia, Florida & Utah permits.
    NRA Certified Chief Range Safety Officer
    Sabre Red Pepper Spray Instructor
    Glock Certified Armorer
    Instructor Bio - http://proactiveshooters.com/about-us/

  5. #5
    Regular Member ProShooter's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone for your replies and emails. I believe that we have an interpreter who has kindly agreed to help us, and help this student!
    James Reynolds

    NRA Certified Firearms Instructor - Pistol, Shotgun, Home Firearms Safety, Refuse To Be A Victim
    Concealed Firearms Instructor for Virginia, Florida & Utah permits.
    NRA Certified Chief Range Safety Officer
    Sabre Red Pepper Spray Instructor
    Glock Certified Armorer
    Instructor Bio - http://proactiveshooters.com/about-us/

  6. #6
    Campaign Veteran MAC702's Avatar
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    Do ranges require deaf people to wear hearing protection?
    "It's not important how many people I've killed. What's important is how I get along with the people who are still alive" - Jimmy the Tulip

  7. #7
    Regular Member TFred's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    Do ranges require deaf people to wear hearing protection?
    I don't know the answer, but it would sure seem to me that the answer would be yes.

    Just because a person cannot hear does not make them immune from further physical damage to the parts of the ear that can be caused by loud noises such as gunfire.

    No matter what particular reason caused someone's deafness, I wouldn't think a ruptured eardrum would be something you'd want to do for fun.

    Interesting question, I would like to know the official answer.

    ETA: When you think about it, it's really ear protection, more than hearing protection.

    TFred
    Last edited by TFred; 05-01-2013 at 04:46 PM.

  8. #8
    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    Do ranges require deaf people to wear hearing protection?
    Pressure wave protection protects more than just the eardrum. There are other structures in the ear related to hearing, ass well as those related to sense of balance* that can be damaged by sudden strong pressure waves and the frequencies at which they occur. Gunshots are not low bass, but upper register mezzo-soprano. Ask folks who play(ed) in a band or who work(ed) with audio equipment about that, but be sure to speak loudly and watch out that they do not start to fall over as they lean closer trying to make out what you are saying.

    stay safe.

    * Sorry if that ruins anybody's impression that rock players are always drunk/stones/high. They may be stumbling around because of inner ear damage.
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

    Because stupidity isn't a race, and everybody can win.

    "No matter how much contempt you have for the media in all this, you don't have enough"
    ----Allahpundit

  9. #9
    Regular Member half_life1052's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidmark View Post
    Pressure wave protection protects more than just the eardrum. There are other structures in the ear related to hearing, ass well as those related to sense of balance* that can be damaged by sudden strong pressure waves and the frequencies at which they occur. Gunshots are not low bass, but upper register mezzo-soprano. Ask folks who play(ed) in a band or who work(ed) with audio equipment about that, but be sure to speak loudly and watch out that they do not start to fall over as they lean closer trying to make out what you are saying.

    stay safe.

    * Sorry if that ruins anybody's impression that rock players are always drunk/stones/high. They may be stumbling around because of inner ear damage.
    I can attest that an impaired vestibular reflex really sucks. It is no fun when you are standing perfectly still and a gremlin sneaks up and spins the world out from beneath your feet. Your eyes and your ears are wired together with your balance so damage in this area can cause so many problems that you wouldn't think of unless you developed the problem.

    Things like:
    difficulty reading
    difficulty driving
    confusion and distraction with no apparent cause
    the fluorescent lights in the supermarket send you up the wall and make you anxious
    suddenly losing your balance with no warning

    and more

    the body may or may not adjust to the damage.

    When it comes on without a known cause it is called Ménière's disease.

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