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Thread: How can I legally protect my gun while open carrying in rain/snow?

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    How can I legally protect my gun while open carrying in rain/snow?

    I was thinking of putting plastic baggie over it. I am just not sure if that would be considered a concealed weapon? I know I definitely don't want to just carry it in the rain and let it get wet.


    I meant gun not gin in the title.
    Last edited by Grapeshot; 05-26-2013 at 06:35 AM. Reason: Fixed title

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    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tazxrulz View Post
    I know I definitely don't want to just carry it in the rain and let it get wet.
    Who cares? You car gets wet. Your house gets wet. They still work.

    But seriously, any quality firearm can withstand getting wet. Just give it a once-over when you get home. 90% of the time a simple wipe down with oil is plenty. 9% of the time a field strip with a wipe down will do. 1% of the time a detail strip with a wipe down of all parts is necessary.

    Actually, the only time I had to go as far as a detail strip was when I dropped a handgun in a pool of water (long, but boring, story).
    Last edited by marshaul; 05-25-2013 at 11:51 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tazxrulz View Post
    I was thinking of putting plastic baggie over it. I am just not sure if that would be considered a concealed weapon? I know I definitely don't want to just carry it in the rain and let it get wet.


    I meant gun not gin in the title.
    Just to add to the comment above. Most hunters spend day's and weeks though out their life time in the field with guns in the rain and snow. If the gun is kept clean and well oiled it's as good as new. I speak from experience :-)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare View Post
    I carry my gin in my tummy, summer and winter, to prevent it being diluted by nasty water, rain or melted snow. It makes the very finest antifreeze for me.
    Thanks for that. I laughed for a good 2-3 minutes.


    Thanks for all your replies. I had someone tell me that it can't get wait under any circumstances. I guess they were wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare View Post
    SNIP I carry my gin in my tummy, summer and winter, to prevent it being diluted by nasty water, rain or melted snow. It makes the very finest antifreeze for me.
    Yes, that's a good way to protect your gin. Where I'm from, the troublemakers will generally leave your gin alone. What you gotta protect is your corn whiskey. Unless you got it hidden and locked up, while you're out OCing, somebody else will be trying to drink it.

    Tha's jes the way i' tis ova heah in the holla.
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    Unless your gun is made of paper, chances are it'll be fine if it gets wet. Just make sure you wipe it down, and take care of it. Even then, if yours happens to be a Glock, it'll be good. I can't personally speak for other guns, but I've literally shot my Glock 22 in rain/sleet/snow/thunderstorm(not a good idea) and it's been carried with me on several hiking and camping trips. Still performs flawlessly, and I haven't cleaned it in almost a year.
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    Re: How can I legally protect my gin while open carrying in rain/snow?

    Even less expensive guns like hi-points will not rust from exposure to moisture. They are made of Zamak3 (slides) & plastic (frames) - with a steel barrel coated with rust prohibiting paint. Even when the slides are exposed to salt water. So a few rain drops or alot of rain, you should be fine. Just do basic maint. & you'll be fine. Now to protect the gin - keep the lid on the flask until your ready for a swig.
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    I fell with the 1911 yesterday into standing water, it was completely immersed. No problem I just broke it down completely, which it needed BTW, dried cleaned and put it back together. Plus I polished up the hammer and sear a little bit more.

    Ammo should not be harmed by water, except rimfire. The primer and bullets are tight fit, and do not allow water to enter. I have fired ammo that accidentally went through the wash without a hitch.

    If you cannot completely disassemble a weapon, but it in the oven at slightly above 100F and leave it, it should dry it out completely. For this WD40 is a good for removing water from small places just in case there are trace amounts of water left after the oven treatment. But if you leave the gun in the oven all day at say 110F there should be no water left in the gun.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf View Post
    For this WD40 is a good for removing water from small places just in case there are trace amounts of water left after the oven treatment.
    I prefer isopropanol for water displacement. It evaporates faster, doesn't leave a residue, and is cheaper to boot. It does leave the item degreased, but that just means you get to ensure it has nothing but the lube you apply on it.

    Frankly, I don't understand what use WD40 has.
    Last edited by marshaul; 05-26-2013 at 11:21 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf View Post
    SNIP I fell with the 1911 yesterday into standing water, it was completely immersed. No problem I just broke it down completely, which it needed BTW, dried cleaned and put it back together. Plus I polished up the hammer and sear a little bit more.
    Boy, some people will do anything to justify a little home gunsmithing.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

    There is no human being on earth I hate so much I would actually vote to inflict government upon him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by marshaul View Post
    I prefer isopropanol for water displacement. It evaporates faster, doesn't leave a residue, and is cheaper to boot. It does leave the item degreased, but that just means you get to ensure it has nothing but the lube you apply on it.

    Frankly, I don't understand what use WD40 has.
    I,m not positive but I think WD is basically mineral spirits, which tends to lift the water away and evaporate. WD does leave a tad more film than mineral spirits though. The problem with alcohol is in most of its forms it has water, the percentage just depends. I use denatured alcohol all the time, I can speed curing of wet leather with it. I would not use alcohol without using mild heat to dry the remaining moisture on metal. As long as there are no plastic parts acetone(nail polish remover) would be better.

    Here is the problem with removing all traces of oil from metal. If you are in a humid climate the metal starts to rust immediately, even if you cannot see it, when exposed to air. Because the metal is warm from drying the pores of the metal are open. I use this method to antique metal, because it is essentially what happens over years with pre 20 century guns used daily. I completely degrease the metal, boil the parts in salt water and remove them and let them sit. After doing this repeatedly a nice grey blotchy finish grows. This is the change of the rust in boiling water, basically the same way people used to clean their guns. Once desired finish is arrived the rust is neutralized by boiling with baking soda water, and then treated with hot vegetable oil.

    So you may want to be careful with the alcohol.
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    The origin of WD-40, abbreviated from the phrase "Water Displacement, 40th formula," was originally designed to repel water and prevent corrosion, and later was found to have numerous household uses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by XD40sc View Post
    The origin of WD-40, abbreviated from the phrase "Water Displacement, 40th formula," was originally designed to repel water and prevent corrosion, and later was found to have numerous household uses.
    Yes, and as I already mentioned, isopropanol is a better water displacer, so long as you bother to oil the part afterwards. Which is fine, because the only good thing that can be said about the "lube" WD40 leaves behind is that it prevents corrosion – it also turns into a gummy mess.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf View Post
    I,m not positive but I think WD is basically mineral spirits, which tends to lift the water away and evaporate. WD does leave a tad more film than mineral spirits though. The problem with alcohol is in most of its forms it has water, the percentage just depends. I use denatured alcohol all the time, I can speed curing of wet leather with it. I would not use alcohol without using mild heat to dry the remaining moisture on metal. As long as there are no plastic parts acetone(nail polish remover) would be better.

    Here is the problem with removing all traces of oil from metal. If you are in a humid climate the metal starts to rust immediately, even if you cannot see it, when exposed to air. Because the metal is warm from drying the pores of the metal are open. I use this method to antique metal, because it is essentially what happens over years with pre 20 century guns used daily. I completely degrease the metal, boil the parts in salt water and remove them and let them sit. After doing this repeatedly a nice grey blotchy finish grows. This is the change of the rust in boiling water, basically the same way people used to clean their guns. Once desired finish is arrived the rust is neutralized by boiling with baking soda water, and then treated with hot vegetable oil.

    So you may want to be careful with the alcohol.
    Boiling water causes rust at exponentially higher rates than exposure to air.

    I guarantee you that you can degrease any properly finished metal part and oil it before any measurable quantity of rust forms, even in the humid subtropical zone (I don't live there presently, but I grew up there).
    Last edited by marshaul; 05-26-2013 at 03:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by marshaul View Post
    Boiling water causes rust at exponentially higher rates than exposure to air.

    I guarantee you that you can degrease any properly finished metal part and oil it before any measurable quantity of rust forms, even in the humid subtropical zone (I don't live there presently, but I grew up there).
    Boiling water causes rust to turn to black oxidation(rust blue), it was how guns were finished in ye ole days. You may not see it, but over time rust does build up when the metal is not protected. I kinda like that finish though, my star has a great patina that I would not undo for anything.. But some of the youngsters might not be to happy with their expensive toy when they turn it in the light and notice it is not so black anymore. That type of browning does not just happen overnight, it is the result of years of exposure without the proper protection. It is not like you can just sit and watch it rust. Though it can be forced to happen quickly with chemicals.
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    Re: How can I legally protect my gun while open carrying in rain/snow?

    Do what the SEALs do before a mission. Nothing.

    Sent from the back of a black van

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    Quote Originally Posted by SPOProds View Post
    Do what the SEALs do before a mission. Nothing.

    Sent from the back of a black van
    But their guns are plastic, aluminum, or plastic coated, at least currently. But the rich patina that old surplus firearms have comes from years of service and exposure. If your surplus firearm is bright blue with no imperfections it has been armory refinished, or never issued. External finish imperfections do not worry me, loss of tension on rusted springs does. Seals probably wear out springs in training before they could weaken from corrosion.
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    Quote Originally Posted by marshaul View Post
    Yes, and as I already mentioned, isopropanol is a better water displacer, so long as you bother to oil the part afterwards. Which is fine, because the only good thing that can be said about the "lube" WD40 leaves behind is that it prevents corrosion – it also turns into a gummy mess.
    I'd heard this, but it goes against my grain to mix ethanol and water, so that reluctance probably slopped over to isopropanol and impeded me from ever trying it.
    Last edited by Citizen; 05-27-2013 at 11:10 AM.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

    There is no human being on earth I hate so much I would actually vote to inflict government upon him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen View Post
    I'd heard this, but it goes against my grain to mix ethanol and water, so that reluctance probably slopped over to isopropanol and impeded me from ever trying it.
    Isopropanol is 1% water so when the alcohol is gone there still is the same problem. I use alcohol for cleaning, same as acetone, I would not use alcohol in any area confined especially with springs. To get moisture from those areas I use heat, and a lube that once the moisture is cooked off it will seal the metal. As long as the heat does not go so far as to change temper on springs, and the metal needs to be heated to changing colors to do that, it is safe. Water turns to gas at a safe level to immerse wet parts into cooking oil, preferably old. Water gone, metal pores absorb oil, parts come out slick as snot. Unless I am trying to patina a BP handgun, once cleaned with hot soapy water and dried off the parts go into old cooking oil, at around 250.

    The reason for old cooking oil is the oil has carbon from food and that carbon ends up in the pores of the steel. But then that is my theory, I have no way to prove it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf View Post
    SNIP As long as the heat does not go so far as to change temper on springs...
    Makes a lot of sense. I formerly enjoyed a muzzle-loader. Boiling water was the cleaning solvent. Any water except solid woulda worked, but very hot water was used because the metal heated up which dried off the water film quickly.

    Its funny. Too much heat reduces the temper of metal. Whereas alcohol definitely reduces my temper, as in, I don't have a temper when alcoholated--can't get mad.
    Last edited by Citizen; 05-27-2013 at 11:42 AM.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

    There is no human being on earth I hate so much I would actually vote to inflict government upon him.

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    <<DISCLAIMER>> You plastic gun owners NEVER heat your gun above the temperature of a very hot day, NEVER. And never put your gun in very hot water or hot oil. The plastic will warp! I keep forgetting some of you folks own plastic guns. And the same goes for wood or plastic grips.
    Last edited by WalkingWolf; 05-27-2013 at 12:09 PM.
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    Regular Member MKEgal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf
    As long as there are no plastic parts acetone (nail polish remover) would be better.
    Last time I got my pistols back from the PD, they had silver marker all over - barrel, frame, slide.
    I ended up using acetone, & while I'm sure it got onto the various plastic parts (had to remove the marker) they showed no damage.
    I was worried at first about the metal finish, until someone showed me to just rub a little oil over it.
    Felt kinda silly... they are Glocks, after all. Not much can harm them.


    ETA: to answer the OP, a clear plastic bag would work, & I don't see how anyone could claim it was concealing the pistol. How about a clear kydex holster? (Do they even make clear kydex, or a similarly hard but formable plastic?)
    Last edited by MKEgal; 05-27-2013 at 12:43 PM.
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    Regular Member WalkingWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MKEgal View Post
    Last time I got my pistols back from the PD, they had silver marker all over - barrel, frame, slide.
    I ended up using acetone, & while I'm sure it got onto the various plastic parts (had to remove the marker) they showed no damage.
    I was worried at first about the metal finish, until someone showed me to just rub a little oil over it.
    Felt kinda silly... they are Glocks, after all. Not much can harm them.


    ETA: to answer the OP, a clear plastic bag would work, & I don't see how anyone could claim it was concealing the pistol. How about a clear kydex holster? (Do they even make clear kydex, or a similarly hard but formable plastic?)
    Yes, you can buy lucite at the hardware store, it should form with heat just like kydex. It is much thicker than kydex and would be heavy. I just never worried about my guns getting wet in the weather, even black powder firearms. Now falling in water like I did Sunday is a different story for guns with percussion caps. As far as the acetone it seems only to affect certain types of plastic, it does come in a plastic bottle(nail polish remover).

    I am glad they used something that could be removed as to scratching it up with a scribe.
    It is well that war is so terrible – otherwise we would grow too fond of it.
    Robert E. Lee
    The patriot volunteer, fighting for country and his rights, makes the most reliable soldier on earth.
    Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson
    What separates the winners from the losers is how a person reacts to each new twist of fate.
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    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalkingWolf View Post
    Isopropanol is 1% water so when the alcohol is gone there still is the same problem. I use alcohol for cleaning, same as acetone, I would not use alcohol in any area confined especially with springs. To get moisture from those areas I use heat, and a lube that once the moisture is cooked off it will seal the metal. As long as the heat does not go so far as to change temper on springs, and the metal needs to be heated to changing colors to do that, it is safe. Water turns to gas at a safe level to immerse wet parts into cooking oil, preferably old. Water gone, metal pores absorb oil, parts come out slick as snot. Unless I am trying to patina a BP handgun, once cleaned with hot soapy water and dried off the parts go into old cooking oil, at around 250.

    The reason for old cooking oil is the oil has carbon from food and that carbon ends up in the pores of the steel. But then that is my theory, I have no way to prove it.
    False. The 1% water in 99% isopropanol is so diluted that it evaporates with the alcohol. This is why 99% isopropanol is used as a water displacer in electronics applications (my field).

    This is because, as the alcohol evaporates, the water has such a high effective surface area/mass ratio (it's so spread out) that it evaporates at a rate similar to the isopropanol itself.

    As for alcohol remaining in the corners, A: WD40 does the same thing, only it leaves your corners gummy, B: grab a hairdryer, wait 30 seconds. Done.
    Last edited by marshaul; 05-27-2013 at 02:01 PM.

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