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Thread: Cellphone encryption, Could this keep NSA from listening in? Drew Zahn, WND

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    Cellphone encryption, Could this keep NSA from listening in? Drew Zahn, WND

    “The privacy of our users rests on three important foundations,” explained StartPage and Ixquick CEO Robert Beens. “We are based in the Netherlands, we use encrypted connections, and – most importantly – we don’t store or share any of our users’ personal search data.”

    No user data stored:, Encrypted (HTTPS) connections:, Not under U.S. jurisdiction:
    “As people get fed up with being spied on, they look for alternatives. We already serve nearly 3 million private searches each day, and we expect that number to grow as people seek shelter from search engines that store and share their private information.”

    This summer, the company plans to launch a new email service called StartMail, which will provide a paid and heavily encrypted private email application. Anyone interested in being a StartMail beta tester can now sign up.
    http://www.wnd.com/2013/06/could-thi...-listening-in/
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    Regular Member Freedom1Man's Avatar
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    In theory, yes

    In theory, yes, cellular phone encryption could keep the NSA from listening in on your phone call.

    HOWEVER of the NSA, or anyone for that matter, knows what form of encryption that you are using then the only thing you are doing is buying time.
    If it is a non-set encryption style that is not registered with the government then yes, you could keep your end of the conversation safe until unless the government figures out your encryption system.
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    Regular Member stealthyeliminator's Avatar
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    The problem is that, pretty much unless you use an open source application that has been independantly verified to not contain backdoors and to employ a cascade of encryption protocols, you're basically putting your trust in the company providing the service. Your're trusting them in a lot of ways. You're trusting that they're competent enough to employ a system without obvious weaknesses, you're trusting that they've built in no backdoors for government access (which is a lot more common than you might think), you're trusting that they aren't recording data (they say they don't, but, it's gotta be recorded to some degree even if those records are 'deleted' as soon as possible while maintaining service)... I mean, I'm glad to see people start trying to solve this problem. Just be careful believing that using an encrypted connection is going to magically keep your communications safe, because it won't. There are a lot of ways to get the information the government wants.

    For example, there was a case where a couple of guys were using encryption software to protect their emails. A government agent was actually able to obtain a warrant to covertly break into one of their offices and install keylogging software and leave undetected. Were they able to log messages being typed and/or the keys being used to encrypt/decrypt the emails? Yes, they were, while this system of encrypting the actual messages takes the encryption even further than simply using encrypted connections as in the OP. I want to find a link to the articile detailing the case, but I have to go to work, so in the meantime, here is one that talks about the "sneak and peak" warrants and government employing malware and such: https://ssd.eff.org/your-computer/govt/sneak-and-peek
    Last edited by stealthyeliminator; 06-18-2013 at 08:38 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Freedom1Man View Post
    If it is a non-set encryption style that is not registered with the government then yes, you could keep your end of the conversation safe until unless the government figures out your encryption system.
    What are going on about, please, "a non-set encryption style ... registered with the government"?

    The only encryption mentioned in the article HTTPS is RSA based RFC 6101 https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6101.

    128 bit keys are common and crackable in theory but for great expense.
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    Regular Member PFC HALE's Avatar
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    Cellphone encryption, Could this keep NSA from listening in? Drew Zahn, WND

    this wont work as cell carriers have "fbi boxes" that tap into calls on the switch side where there isnt encryption. the encryption happens between the cellphone and the serving RNC/BSC inhibiting RF interception and evesdropping. the mobile switch offices i have worked at allows technicians to literally plug into a T1 port with a test set and listen in on conversations unencrypted and you will NEVER know.(piggybacks passively)

    the only way to get total security is to have end to end encryption all the way through and remove the "fbi boxes" that tap in as if you were there in person.

    been in the industry 20 years.
    HOPE FOR THE BEST, EXPECT THE WORST, PREPARE FOR WAR

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    "FBI Box", is that another name for an Obama-phone?

    EXCLUSIVE: Hidden camera catches wireless company employees passing out 'Obama phones' to people who say they'll SELL them for drugs, shoes, handbags and spending cash
    • The 'Lifeline' free-cell-phone scheme cost $2.2 BILLION last year alone, all of it from fees added to the phone bills of paying customers
    • The biggest beneficiary other than low-income consumers is billionaire Carlos Slim Helu, whose TracFone has collected $1.5 BILLION to date
    • One company told MailOnline it will fire a salesperson who laughed uproariously when a woman said she would sell her phone to buy shoes
    • Conservative firebrand James O'Keefe sent undercover actors to pose as 'Obama phone' seekers aiming to sell the goods; no one turned them down
    • Legislation in Congress would remove the cell phone component of the program, which launched in 1984 and covered only land lines until 2008
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ding-cash.html
    Last edited by Nightmare; 06-18-2013 at 08:49 AM.
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    Regular Member Maverick9's Avatar
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    There are some ways to make the spying on citizens more difficult (time-consuming), but too many people seem to be on board with them doing it. They just think in a narrow, immediate sense and ignore the problem of slippery slope. They think 'Oh I've done nothing wrong', but even 'innocent' people can be nailed by vindictive persons, errors and mistaken identity, archaic laws, and other things.

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    Regular Member March Hare's Avatar
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    I don't know about cellphone encryption, I'm sure there's a way, but for email and similar communications I would suggest checking this out.

    http://www.gnupg.org/ - Public key encryption, free and open source.
    http://www.gnupg.org/documentation/faqs.en.html - FAQ

    -MH

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    Last edited by March Hare; 06-20-2013 at 04:46 PM.
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    WebPG

    Quote Originally Posted by March Hare View Post
    I don't know about cellphone encryption, I'm sure there's a way, but for email and similar communications I would suggest checking this out.
    http://www.webpg.org/?view=home

    About WebPG

    WebPG is a free, open source suite of tools to bring GnuPG/PGP (gpg, gnupg) to the browser, in an effort to make cryptographic methods usable, safe and accessible to the common man.

    WebPG encompasses several projects, from the backend technology that interfaces with GnuPG/PGP (gpg, gnupg), to the user interface utilities that bring those methods to the browser. [more]

    WebPG is free!The code, extension(s) and utilities provided by WebPG are absolutely free, written for the good of all man kind. You will never be charged to use these tools. See our license here

    Supported Operating Systems Every line of code, every module, every stictch of debugging that goes into this project has the expressed goal of supporting Windows, Linux and OSX. Work is currently underway to add support for ChromeOS, and possibly other mobile platforms.
    I am responsible for my writing, not your understanding of it.

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