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Thread: National Night Out is Tonight!

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012

    National Night Out is Tonight!

    Don't forget, National Night Out is tonight . It's a great opportunity to OC and meet others, and spread the gospel.

    What is NNO? I'm glad you asked.

    It's an event started by the National Association of Town Watch, an organization that has helped people understand that crime prevention is first and foremost the responsibility of all, not something only the police should be concerned about. As OCers we have both the desire and the means to defend ourselves and others (the ultimate form of crime prevention) and of course also should be vigilant to be the eyes and ears of the police, documenting and reporting crimes in progress, etc. I can state in my agency, probably 1/3 of the crimes in progress (at least) we interrupt and catch the bad guys are because of concerned citizens whether organized into Block Watch formal groups, or done on their own

    According to their website:National Association of Town Watch (NATW) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the development and promotion of various crime prevention programs including neighborhood watch groups, law enforcement agencies, state and regional crime prevention associations, businesses, civic groups, and individuals, devoted to safer communities. The nations premiere crime prevention network works with law enforcement officials and civilian leaders to keep crime watch volunteers informed, interested, involved and motivated. Since 1981, NATW continues to serve thousands of members across the nation.

    The introduction of National Night Out, “America’s Night Out Against Crime”, in 1984 began an effort to promote involvement in crime prevention activities, police-community partnerships, neighborhood camaraderie and send a message to criminals letting them know that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back. NATW’s National Night Out program culminates annually, on the first Tuesday of August (In Texas, the first Tuesday of October).

    National Night Out now involves over 37 million people and 15,000 communities from all fifty states, U.S. Territories, Canadian cities, and military bases worldwide.

    The traditional “lights on” campaign and symbolic front porch vigils turned into a celebration across America with various events and activities including, but not limited to, block parties, cookouts, parades, visits from emergency personnel, rallies and marches, exhibits, youth events, safety demonstrations and seminars, in effort to heighten awareness and enhance community relations.

    Peskin said, “It’s a wonderful opportunity for communities nationwide to promote police-community partnerships, crime prevention, and neighborhood camaraderie. While the one night is certainly not an answer to crime, drugs and violence, National Night Out represents the kind of spirit, energy and determination to help make neighborhoods a safer place year round. The night celebrates safety and crime prevention successes and works to expand and strengthen programs for the next 364 days.”


    Those of us who are OCers know that OCing and carrying of firearms in general by concerned citizens is a sacred right, and that OCers and CCWers are an incredibly important segment of the community when it comes to keeping communities safe and keeping bad guys on the run.

    Responsible citizenship is emphasized by block watch activities and we can make a big impact in spreading the word about OCing if we show up to these NNO events tonight and act responsibly (not a good occasion to get all jacked up drunk fwiw), cordially, etc. showing people that OC is here to stay and that we are responsible members of the community and like Block Watches, we are also devoted to safer communities.

    PD's (good PD's) work in partnership with the communities. This is a perfect occasion to engage in same. On duty officers, myself included will be assigned to attend various block watch parties and it's the perfect opportunity to break bread, make concerns known and get to know your local beat officers as well as your local block watch members. If your PD isn't doing stuff right, and you do not make your concerns known to them, you are just as responsible for the bad outcomes as they are. You have plenty of opportunity to effect change in your communities and in your PD's. We all have a responsibility to help keep our neighborhoods safe, and to watch the watchers (the PD) as well as the bad guys.

    If your "block" doesn't have a formal Block Watch, it's a good place to go to get information on how to start one and the resources available to Block Watches

    I sincerely hope to see some OCers attending NNO. I'll be OCing myself, of course, but I'm required to do so while on duty.

    Come out with a positive attitude, a desire to meet other concerned members of your community, and a big appetite!

    Last edited by PALO; 08-06-2013 at 03:10 PM.

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Thru Death's Door in Wisconsin
    "The Town watch program is similar to that of the Neighborhood watch, the major difference is that the Town Watch tend to actively patrol in pseudo-uniforms, i.e. marked vests or jackets and caps, and is equipped with two way radios to directly contact the local police. The Town Watch serves as an auxiliary to the police which provides weapons (if any), equipment, and training. The town watch usually returns their gear at the end of their duty. Like the town watchman of colonial America, each citizen must take an active interest in protecting their neighbors and be willing to give their time and effort to this volunteer activity." was registered in 1997

    Trust and verify.
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