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Thread: Bring a firearm into Canada and back to the US, with a PAL

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    Regular Member Samopal's Avatar
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    Bring a firearm into Canada and back to the US, with a PAL

    What would be the process for bringing a non-restricted firearm to Canada? From what I read on the RCMP site, since I have an RPAL I just need to declare it at the border, there are no forms or fees to fill out. How about bringing it back to the US when I enter? I know the US' import/export laws regarding firearms are usually more strict than that of Canada. What kind of paperwork do I need to appease the CBP and ATF?

    While we're at it, does anyone know the process for bringing a restricted firearm? That isn't my main concern but it would be nice to know how to to bring a pistol into Canada for some target shooting if I ever wanted to.
    You can never be too rich, too good-looking, or too well-armed.

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    Regular Member Samopal's Avatar
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    So I did some more research... it seems that, before I go to Canada, I have to fill out a Form 4457 at a CBP office, which is a "registration for personal effects taken abroad". Upon returning to Canada I just have to declare my firearm and show them the 4457.

    So basically:
    1: Go to CBP office, register firearm on Form 4457
    2: Declare firearm at Canadian border, show my PAL
    3: Declare my firearm coming back to the US and show the the 4457

    Is that it? It seems much simpler than I thought it'd be.

    Edit: this is what I've found for NON-RESTRICTED firearms only. I can't find anything on bringing restricted items across apart from "call the RCMP".
    Last edited by Samopal; 08-30-2013 at 09:39 PM. Reason: clarification
    You can never be too rich, too good-looking, or too well-armed.

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    Accomplished Advocate BB62's Avatar
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    I'm responding and subscribing because there's no way on God's green earth it's as simple as you describe.

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    Regular Member Samopal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BB62 View Post
    I'm responding and subscribing because there's no way on God's green earth it's as simple as you describe.
    Well me having a Canadian RPAL apparently eliminates most of the hassle. Here are my sources if you're interested.

    https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/det.../firearm/sno/1
    http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/f...visite-eng.htm

    An individual must be at least 18 years old to bring a firearm into Canada. Individuals that are younger than 18 may use a firearm in certain circumstances, but an adult must remain present and responsible for the firearm.
    ...
    With a Canadian firearms licence, there is no need to complete the Non-Resident Firearms Declaration. However, an oral declaration must still be made to the customs officer.
    ...
    You will need a completed CBP Form 4457 to present a CBP officer upon your return to the U.S.
    You can never be too rich, too good-looking, or too well-armed.

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    Accomplished Advocate BB62's Avatar
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    What's an RPAL? I see a PAL is a possession and acquisition license (which I'm sure all the criminals have), but...?

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    Regular Member Samopal's Avatar
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    An RPAL is a Restricted Possession and Acquisition License. Same thing as a PAL, but lets you also own restricted firearms like handguns, AR-15s, etc. It's just an extra test regarding handgun safety when getting your license.

    It's kind of irrelevant here since this information is just for non-restricted firearms, I'm just used to typing "RPAL" because that's what I have. :S
    You can never be too rich, too good-looking, or too well-armed.

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    Regular Member EMNofSeattle's Avatar
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    I would PM washington forum member Hermanr he's a canadian expat
    they love our milk and honey, but they preach about some other way of living, when they're running down my country man they're walkin' on the fightin side of me

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  8. #8
    Accomplished Advocate BB62's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samopal View Post
    An RPAL is a Restricted Possession and Acquisition License. Same thing as a PAL, but lets you also own restricted firearms like handguns, AR-15s, etc. It's just an extra test regarding handgun safety when getting your license...
    What do all of these "licenses" get one? What can I NOT transport into Canada, and what CAN I carry? A second question is: what does one need to transport firearms by car to Alaska? And, finally, what about ammo?

    How tough is the "test"?

    Thank you.

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    You might need a Authorization To Transport a restricted item

    You might need a "Authorization To Transport" to transport a 'restricted item' .

    (Below from a government site and should be no copyright issues)

    http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/trans-eng.htm#d2

    "Q. How do I obtain an authorization to transport a restricted or prohibited firearm?

    If you have a valid Canadian firearms licence authorizing you to possess that class of firearm, you can apply by calling 1-800-731-4000 or by submitting an Application for an Authorization to Transport Restricted Firearms and Prohibited Firearms, form RCMP 5490, to the Chief Firearms Officer (CFO) of the province or territory where the firearm is located.

    If you are a non-resident and are using a Non-Resident Firearm Declaration to bring a restricted firearm to Canada for an approved purpose , you should contact the applicable CFO in advance to apply for an Authorization to Transport (using form RCMP 5490). The CFO offices can be contacted by phoning the Canadian Firearms Programís contact centre at 1-800-731-4000. The hours of operation of the contact centre are Monday to Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. nationwide. "
    I am not a lawyer, I study the history of gun control laws.

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