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Thread: ?? about inheriting handguns

  1. #1
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    ?? about inheriting handguns

    My dad, who was a Kansas resident, passed away this past summer. My mom wanted to get his guns out of the house and she gave them to me. Several handguns and long guns.

    By law, am I required to file any paperwork, or am I ok?

    I don't want any issues like are being discussed under a separate topic.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Regular Member Redbaron007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Show-me_Greg View Post
    My dad, who was a Kansas resident, passed away this past summer. My mom wanted to get his guns out of the house and she gave them to me. Several handguns and long guns.

    By law, am I required to file any paperwork, or am I ok?

    I don't want any issues like are being discussed under a separate topic.

    Thanks
    My quick recollection is, as long as you are legally able to own the firearms and no consideration is being made, they don't have to pass through an FFL. Disclosure....I am not an dealer with a FFL. Please feel free to correct me.
    "I can live for two weeks on a good compliment."
    ~Mark Twain

  3. #3
    Regular Member OC for ME's Avatar
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    ...shall not preclude any person who lawfully acquires a firearm by bequest or intestate succession in a State other than his State of residence from transporting the firearm into or receiving it in that State, if it is lawful for such person to purchase or posses such firearm in that State...

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/uscode/18/I/44/922

    http://legal-dictionary.thefreedicti...ate+Succession
    Loose lips sink ships.

    Technically, being his son, and direct heir, absent a Last Will and Testament, the executor is responsible for the proper disposition of the estate. Kansas may be like the majority of states where the spouse, absent a will, is the defacto executor and may dispose of the estate's property as she sees fit. All she has to "say" is; "Dad wanted you to have these."

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