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Thread: .22 for pistol team

  1. #1
    Regular Member Campo6245's Avatar
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    .22 for pistol team

    Hello everyone. I am planning on joining a pistol team for .22 LR. I have a S&W 22a that I use for plinking, and a Ruger 22.45 target version. I was thinking about using the Ruger until I can put a little more money aside to purchase a S&W 41. My question is do you any of you have experience about with using the volquartsen after market parts to increase the performance of the trigger? Will this improve my scores enough to be worth it? I am an experienced shooter, but just recently got into competitive shooting. I average about a 210-240 (240 on good days) lol. Any information is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Regular Member Campo6245's Avatar
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    no competition shooters I guess

  3. #3
    Regular Member mobiushky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Campo6245 View Post
    no competition shooters I guess
    Not with a .22LR. Though I saw there is a Ruger challenge up here this Sat. I might check it out and see if my kid wants to try it out. I think NSSF runs it now?

  4. #4
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    OCDO rules (#20) require that registrants be at least 13 yo. Most often by that age competitive shooters are into higher calibers. Of course there are the children and grandchildren of members.

    In the past, many high school teams (JROTC or NRA) utilized .22lr - now many of those are using air rifles.

    The level of specific interest in .22 competition has declined from years past which IMO is a shame.
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  5. #5
    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Volquartsen are good parts. Most do not seem to need a trained gunsmith to install.

    A question, before you go putting new parts in: How much can you improve your scores by improving your technique? 210-240/300 leaves a lot of room that may not be the fault of the equipment forward of the wrist.

    stay safe.
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

    Because stupidity isn't a race, and everybody can win.

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  6. #6
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    I shot Bullseye for a number of years and got fairly decent at it, but I was shooting 2000 rounds of rimfire Bullseye and 1000 rounds defensive shooting a month. The Ruger you have is an OK shooter but you'll find that the air gap on the front sight is excessive for good Bullseye shooting and the trigger is rough. A drop in Volquartsen trigger will be a lot better than the stock Ruger trigger (I have found Ruger triggers to be gritty and inconsistent) but even the Volquartsen trigger is not even close to a broke in Mod 41 trigger. I would also look for different width rear sight blades if you stay with the Ruger for a while. If you are serious about being competitive with Bulleye shooting, drop the bucks on an S&W 41, Volquartsen, Hammerlli, Walther or one of the other top end Bullseye guns on the market. A good bullseye gun is an investment, but assuming you have the the shooting ability, they will raise your scores significantly. A good used 41 will run between $900.00 and $1200.00. If you are just going to have fun with bulleye the Ruger will be fine.

    One of the biggest influences on rimfire accuracy is ammo (once the trigger, sights, form and timing is worked out). My 41's will shoot most ammos fairly well, but really come into their own with particular brands of ammo. I advise getting as many brands of ammo as possible and find what ammo your gun likes. I used a C-More dot sight and sand bag rests testing ammo, shooting 5 groups of 5 rounds for each brand, after I found what the gun seemed to like, I shot them more. Try some of the target specific ammo and compare group accuracy to the standard brands as I found some of the target ammo did not shoot any better than standard ammo in my guns. Each of my 41’s both shot Green Tag and Federal target ammo very well (ragged 1 hole groups over bags at 50’ if I was on my game). If you get really serious about it you’ll want to purchase ammo by lot numbers as there can be significant differences between lot numbers in how the same ammo shoots. I used a rim gauge dial and sorted cheaper ammo by the read out and could get Winchester Wildcats to shoot fairly well for practice ammo, abet there was more flyers.


    Good luck and enjoy, Bullseye is great fun…and Bullseye shooters have almost as many excuses as Trap Shooters…. in the end it always the damn guns fault.
    Last edited by .45acp; 04-10-2014 at 08:57 PM. Reason: Spellin and clarifcation
    Steve


    "Life is hard, its even harder when you are stupid!"

  7. #7
    Regular Member Campo6245's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone for your input; it is greatly appreciated. Stay safe, shoot straight and enjoy your weekend!

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