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Thread: Studies question Army standard for mental illness screening. 20% ill before enlisting

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    Studies question Army standard for mental illness screening. 20% ill before enlisting

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...andards-menta/

    http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-me-...#ixzz2v0T0hr7i

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-c...n/CON-20024309

    Should IED sufferers, vets or not, be disbarred their Second Amendment Rights, quite apart from the PTSD issue? Is PTSD symptomatic of IED?
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    Regular Member OC for ME's Avatar
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    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontl...rts/exist.html

    Psycho-babble = nixing your 2A right.

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    Regular Member DocWalker's Avatar
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    A TBI (traumatic brain injury) and PTSD have very similar symptoms. This is just another excuse to disarm people that took an oath to defend the US Constitution from all enemies foreign and DOMESTIC.

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    Campaign Veteran MAC702's Avatar
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    Man, there's just a huge "that's why they joined the Army" joke there...
    "It's not important how many people I've killed. What's important is how I get along with the people who are still alive" - Jimmy the Tulip

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    Regular Member DocWalker's Avatar
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    Man, there's just a huge "that's why they joined the Army" joke there...
    This is why it used to be go to jail or join the Army back in the 60-70's...

  6. #6
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    Isnt the fact that you joined the Army proof enough? lol -- just ribbing army dudes !

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    Results, Conclusions and Relevance

    Results The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army’s increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides.

    Conclusions and Relevance Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view that exposure to combat-related trauma is the exclusive cause of the increase in Army suicides.

    http://archpsyc.jamanetwork.com/arti...icleid=1835337
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    Results, Conclusions and Relevance

    Results A total of 25.1% of respondents met criteria for any 30-day disorder (15.0% internalizing; 18.4% externalizing) and 11.1% for multiple disorders. A total of 76.6% of cases reported pre-enlistment age at onset of at least one 30-day disorder (49.6% internalizing; 81.7% externalizing). Also, 12.8% of respondents reported severe role impairment. Controlling for sociodemographic and Army career correlates, which were broadly consistent with other studies, 30-day disorders with pre-enlistment (χ28 = 131.8, P < .001) and post-enlistment (χ27 = 123.8, P < .001) ages at onset both significantly predicted severe role impairment, although pre-enlistment disorders were more consistent powerful predictors (7 of 8 disorders significant; odds ratios, 1.6-11.4) than post-enlistment disorders (5 of 7 disorders significant; odds ratios, 1.5-7.7). Population-attributable risk proportions of severe role impairment were 21.7% for pre-enlistment disorders, 24.3% for post-enlistment disorders, and 43.4% for all disorders.

    Conclusions and Relevance Interventions to limit accession or increase resilience of new soldiers with pre-enlistment mental disorders might reduce prevalence and impairments of mental disorders in the US Army.

    Mental disorders are leading causes of US military morbidity.1 Indeed, health care visits and days out of role owing to mental disorders in the US military are exceeded only by those owing to injuries.2 This is partly because selection and retention criteria lead to low rates of chronic physical disorders, but military service also has unique stressors that can increase mental disorders.3- 6 Annual hospital bed days owing to mental disorders in the US military doubled7 between 2006 and 2010. The military suicide rate also increased substantially during this period.8 Although these trends are widely believed to be linked to the protracted conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq,3,9 it is not clear how many of these cases represented recurrences of pre-enlistment disorders. This question is important given recent discussions of optimal recruitment-retention strategies for an all-volunteer Army during times of war.10,11 We know from general population epidemiological studies that most lifetime mental disorders have childhood-adolescence onsets12- 14 that are initially too mild to cause rejection from military service, even if they predict more severe subsequent episodes.15 We are unaware of previous research that has examined the question of pre-enlistment history of mental disorders. Such data are presented here from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS; www.armystarrs.org), a large multicomponent epidemiological-neurobiological study of Army suicide.16

    http://archpsyc.jamanetwork.com/arti...icleid=1835338
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