Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Improving SA

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Yakima, wa
    Posts
    31

    Improving SA

    Hey all,

    I'm trying to come up with a few things to help improve my Situational Awareness, and deal with unknown persons getting too close.

    First, I want to come up with a mnemonic to help assess the potential threat level, either when entering a new location, or, reassessing as the situation changes in a particular location. Something like : severity of threat, location, exits, course of action... Etc, and something that can be formed into something that can be easily remembered. Ideas?

    Second, what are some of your strategies for dealing with people (potential threats) approaching you, or are within your "bubble" to get then to either back off or go away?

    It's difficult, I know, in public places. But, I've seen many people advocate a stern "leave me alone!" Or "go away!"... But, in reality, not to minimize it, but, most people approaching you do not have ill intent, but, we obviously don't know that. A loud "stay back!" Could also be seen as an aggressive action. Just my opinion.

    So any ideas on either of these?

    I often try and plan my actions to minimize close interaction with unknown people, but, sometimes you have to take the risk.

    But really, I'm looking for things to say or actions to take when someone is approaching but probably has no thoughts of harm, yet I don't want to seem like the crazy guy yelling at people in the Walmart parking lot, lol..

    Thanks in advance,

    T.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Thru Death's Door in Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,154
    Shun icky. When an uncomfortable situation/person develops/approaches LEAVE.
    I am responsible for my writing, not your understanding of it.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wa, ,
    Posts
    2,769
    Start a hacking cough, pick your nose, pass gas.
    Really, it would depend upon their demeanor. Usually a simple statement such as...I am quite busy right now can you wait over there and I will be with you shortly.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    US Navy
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by thunderbolt View Post
    Hey all,

    I'm trying to come up with a few things to help improve my Situational Awareness, and deal with unknown persons getting too close.

    First, I want to come up with a mnemonic to help assess the potential threat level, either when entering a new location, or, reassessing as the situation changes in a particular location. Something like : severity of threat, location, exits, course of action... Etc, and something that can be formed into something that can be easily remembered. Ideas?

    Second, what are some of your strategies for dealing with people (potential threats) approaching you, or are within your "bubble" to get then to either back off or go away?

    I think situational awareness is very important but you come across in your post as a bit paranoid. There are basically two reasons one would be "in your bubble" of personal space...1)to not do you harm, 2) to do you harm.

    Lets analyze for a moment:
    1) to not do you harm...this would be your standard interaction with both people you know and don't know. It accounts for 99%+ of all your interactions throughout your time on this planet. Your suspicion of people who fall into this interaction category should be based on your relationship with them...and yes that even includes strangers approaching you for the first time; for isntance eye contact posture, etc are the basis for how they relate to you and you to them.

    2)to do you harm...this type of interaction should be few and far between unless you are carrying yourself in such a way as to attract this kind of attention more often. I am not saying that harmful intent is invited but if you are experiencing this type of interaction on more than the mos rare occasion then you should assess how you interface with others in your environment.

    SA of those around you and where you are should help you differentiate between those who fall in the two categories above...but this is not failsafe.

    If you find yourself in a situation where you are threatened then your first course of action should be one that leads to increased safety...this usually means removing yourself from the threatening situation and that can usually be most expeditiously carried out by changing your physical location...for instance, if you feel threatened walking down a dark alley then should probably not be walking down that alley.

    Most crime is opportunistic so if you are in an area where there are not a lot of people and someone is approaching you that you think has mal-intent, then start by moving to an area where there are people. If the person continues to persue you then you need to assess your options...some instances using your voice may be appropriate, other instances require a heightened posture upto and including drawing your firearm.

    The reallity though is that this type of interaction should be remote, so how does one prepare for this?...

    ...be out in public more often and be conscious of where you are and who is in the environment at different distances. Be conscious of where you are walking on the sidewalk, do you walk next to buildings? or closer to the street? When I am with my wife and kids I walk closer to buildings as a matter of habit so that if something happens such as someone jumping out, I will be between them and the assailant and they have the open space of the street to run into/across to increase space between them and an attacker.'

    The first line of self defense is doing everything you can to not put yourself in a position where you need to defend yourself and your best weapon is the one between your ears.

    Be aware of yourself, those around you, and where you are. Then present yourself as your truly are personalitywise.

    Just because we carry a firearm does not mean we should not be approachable.

    Also, don't get carried away with all this as life should be enjoyable...you can easily make going out of your house a chore for both you and those around you while you try to develop a heightened sense of awareness.

    You are exercising good SA if nobody around you is acutely aware that you are exercising a heightened sense of SA.

    -Z

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Yakima, wa
    Posts
    31
    Thanks for the well thought-out post, Zohan.

    Let me think about it and I'll post my thoughts later.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Olympia
    Posts
    3
    First off, you must be free of the mindset that you have to be polite and courteous to everyone that you meet. Not everyone deserves your immediate respect, and you get no points for trying to remain a gentleman when assessing an unknown threat. Once a situation is clarified, or no threat detected... you can revert back to your old, polite self.
    But, if the situation seems sketchy, take command of it early and control the encounter.

    Back in Dec. my sons (25 and 27) and I went to Denny's in Lacey for a late night meal. 9pm, dark... we were standing next to the car in the parking lot having a smoke. I saw a shadow appear out of the bushes and start to approach us. I didn't mention this to my sons as I'm always trying to teach them situational awareness and wanted to see how long it took for them to notice. Sadly, they didn't. I let the stranger take a few more steps and then yelled...

    "That's close enough, you can stop right there. I don't have any spare change, I don't know what time it is and I'm not giving you a cigarette so piss off!" He stopped in his tracks, turned around and scampered off.

    "Geez, Pops," said my son, "You're a professional a$$hole." "Yeah, ain't I, now... but I intend to remain an alive a$$hole."

    What was the stranger's intent? Don't know, don't care, but I wasn't going to let him get close enough to find out. Sure, things might have been different. He could have replied,"That's ok... My battery's dead and I was just wondering if I could get a jump start..." and then I would have changed my perspective on things. But as it was, seeing how I reacted in a manner that he wasn't accustomed to, he retreated back into the bushes.

    One common thread in a lot of assault incidents is the victim's statement, "I saw him coming toward me... I was getting a little scared, but I didn't want to say anything because I didn't want to appear to be rude. (or impolite... or raciss... etc.) Happily, I am free of such feelings of guilt.

    ...yet I don't want to seem like the crazy guy yelling at people in the Walmart parking lot.
    Yeah, like doing that would really make you stand out there.

    Zohan made some very good points... especially with his "Do you no harm/do you harm" statement. I would add that unknown people that approach you want something and it's at your discretion whether to be generous or not. Politely quoting Richard III, "I'm not in the giving vein today" might be lost on the less well-read mugger but a quick, sharp verbal challenge to his approach harms no one. Sure, a guy coming toward me in the Walmart parking lot may reply that he only needs a jump start... but there better be a car parked in the row behind him with its hood open before I believe him.

    All situations are different and must be viewed in their totality and level of risk. Dark, shadows, bushes, alleys, deserted area... One stranger approaching, several approaching with two fanning out to the sides...

  7. #7
    Campaign Veteran gogodawgs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Federal Way, Washington, USA
    Posts
    5,666
    Live Free or Die!

  8. #8
    Regular Member skiingislife725's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lake Stevens, WA
    Posts
    400
    This seems relevant to post here, from Craig Douglas (aka "SouthNarc" from Shivworks).

    http://www.triangletactical.net/wp-c...sncontacts.pdf

    And more SouthNarc gold can be found on http://www.totalprotectioninteractive.com/
    Last edited by skiingislife725; 03-16-2014 at 12:26 PM.

  9. #9
    Regular Member Maverick9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Mid-atlantic
    Posts
    1,505
    You can do three things.

    You can set things up so that you don't have to be that aware. For example in the restroom, go into a stall. At the grocery store, get an employee to help you bring your groceries to the car.

    You can observe situations where you were caught unaware and try to analyze how that happened and if it could be prevented. You can find situations where you found yourself 'stuck' in the event, clinging to what you were doing so that you didn't leave.

    You can try to design reactions so that if you do get caught you can recover and deal with the situation. For example you can pre-deploy a tool, or you can wear some type of barrier or armored gear, so you can absorb an attack and still recover enough to respond.

    But to try and improve your alertness? It's not possible. It's called 'fatigue' and it happens because of habituation and exhaustion.

  10. #10
    Regular Member 509rifas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Yakima County
    Posts
    253
    Look at their shoes before they get close.
    LIVE FREE OR DIE TRYING

  11. #11
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Chesterfield, Va.
    Posts
    34,613
    Quote Originally Posted by 509rifas View Post
    Look at their shoes before they get close.
    Look them directly in the eyes - send the message "I see you." That look is universally recognized and communicates awareness.
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Bainbridge Island, Wa
    Posts
    93
    Quote Originally Posted by Grapeshot View Post
    Look them directly in the eyes - send the message "I see you." That look is universally recognized and communicates awareness.
    But they might have nice shoes!
    I agree with all that has been said. It is quite the quandary when you would accept physical harm / financial loss at the cost of trying not to be rude. So long as you are at one with yourself (know thyself), then any recovery from verbal or social self defense can be overcome.

  13. #13
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Chesterfield, Va.
    Posts
    34,613
    Quote Originally Posted by FattyKrack View Post
    But they might have nice shoes!
    I agree with all that has been said. It is quite the quandary when you would accept physical harm / financial loss at the cost of trying not to be rude. So long as you are at one with yourself (know thyself), then any recovery from verbal or social self defense can be overcome.
    I am aware of an individual who when confronted by a knife wielding robber who wanted his wallet, instead pulled his gun and said, "I like your shoes.""

    The BG immediately took of his shoes, left them and sprinted up the narrow street sans foot ware.
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •