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Thread: Grabbing gun in self-defense scenario so that it doesn't cause injury if fired

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    Regular Member stealthyeliminator's Avatar
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    Grabbing gun in self-defense scenario so that it doesn't cause injury if fired

    I've wondered about this but never bothered to look up the answer or proper solution. I always just sort of figured, if I had to, I'd just do it whether it caused injury to my hand or not. Better a gash in my hand than a bullet in my head. But, it's interesting to see that there's a proper way to do it so that it prevents injury to your hand and prevents the handgun of your attacker from cycling.

    I actually figured that this was the case after seeing a demonstration in which a guy disarmed an assailant and turn the handgun on him. He always racked the slide immediately following taking possession of the handgun. I figured the reason for this was in case the handgun was fired as he was taking possession, and his hand prevented proper actuation of the slide, racking the slide would clear the malfunction.

    Just thought this was interesting, and interesting that they actually demonstrate it with live ammo.

    Guess you need the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVtXPIjM3jQ
    Last edited by stealthyeliminator; 05-01-2014 at 02:09 PM.
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    Campaign Veteran Running Wolf's Avatar
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    It's interesting that they're not trying to stop the initial shot. It's an effective means of stopping follow-up shots. Unless one racks the slide. Or if one is using a revolver.
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    I'm sure someone with physics experience/knowledge could figure out how much force is actually needed to rack the slide at the given speed. It can't be much, since it's a pretty light spring and the slide only goes back so far.

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    Regular Member Fallschirmjäger's Avatar
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    Two things come to mind, \
    1) You know those guys who don't like carrying with one in the chamber? Sometimes they're the gargoyles, too.
    2) Sometimes the gun will go off while you are controlling it and taking it away from the gargoyle.

    Racking the slide takes care of both problems, just as you would rack the slide on any "found weapon" should you be forced to rely on it. (Saying the last because it was common to set up a jam in any "found weapon" scenario when doing training."

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    Regular Member stealthyeliminator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Running Wolf View Post
    It's interesting that they're not trying to stop the initial shot. It's an effective means of stopping follow-up shots. Unless one racks the slide. Or if one is using a revolver.
    I think that the intent is to deflect the point of aim away so that if there is an initial shot, it doesn't land on you. It would probably be much more difficult to actually prevent the initial shot, I would think. Not that I have any training in this area, whatsoever.

    The video I saw a long time ago of the disarmament explained that the defender was capable of deflecting the muzzle away and moving out of the line of fire in a shorter time than the reaction time of the assailant to process what he was seeing and pull the trigger. Now, this doesn't mean he won't pull the trigger, just that by the time he does, the muzzle will have been deflected. There's probably many other techniques out there other than what I saw, though. I don't guess I've seen any that actually prevent the first shot, except maybe one against a specific model handgun.

    I didn't think about revolvers. I guess in a revolver scenario you'd just have to keep in mind that follow up shots are more likely while gaining control of the handgun.
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    Regular Member dakatak87's Avatar
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    With a revolver, would the trigger and revolving mechanism have enough leverage to rotate the cylinder while being held? If the cylinder can't rotate, no(or no more) shots.

    I don't have a revolver handy to test this, but my guess is it will not rotate.
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    Campaign Veteran MAC702's Avatar
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    You have a lot more leverage on the cylinder by grabbing it than the linkage does to try to rotate it from the trigger. This assumes, of course that it is not already cocked. But grabbing the cylinder takes longer and doesn't help until you've actually accomplished it. Deflecting the revolver (or any handgun) is far quicker, without needing to differentiate what it is.

    I am not an expert in the disarming aspect of self-defense. So far, I've been extremely successful in my expertise of not having guns pointed at me with bad intentions.
    Last edited by MAC702; 05-02-2014 at 01:46 AM.
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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    There are various, easily learned techniques. Train, train, train.

    IMO - the price of not reacting is more damaging.
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    Saw a video of a grab of a Webley MK6 the person grabbing received several puncture wounds to the web of his had but the revolver didn't fire.

    Training and practice and more practice are key. But be careful it is easy to rip open hands and break fingers if you are not.

    In real life you are not gently taking the gun from the persons hands you are ripping it out and could easily break of tear things.
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