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Thread: Too many statutes, too many cases. 45K pages USC. US 11th Circuit.

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    Too many statutes, too many cases. 45K pages USC. US 11th Circuit.

    https://www.federalregister.gov/uplo...1-1-1-2013.pdf

    http://fourthamendment.com/?p=16135

    http://media.ca11.uscourts.gov/opini...410086.ord.pdf
    There is a vast amount of federal law. So much that no one can hope to keep it all in mind, much less master the mass of it. But it was not always so. The current universe of federal law did begin with a bang, although not a big one. It began with a Constitution on four parchment pages, followed by a Bill of Rights on one more.[FN1] But the Constitution begat Congress, and Congress begat statutes –– lots and lots of statutes –– the current version of them fills 45,000 pages of the United States Code.[FN2] Those statutes begat hundreds of administrative agencies, and many of those agencies begat regulations –– lots and lots of them. So many that the Code of Federal Regulations fills 235 volumes and is 175,000 pages long, give or take a few thousand pages.[FN3] As the number of statutes and regulations has multiplied exponentially, so has decisional law. Supreme Court decisions fill 573 volumes of the official United States Reports, while federal court of appeals decisions fill 2,000 or so volumes of the Federal Reporter series.

    Truly, federal laws have multiplied to become “beyond number, like the stars in the sky and the sand on the seashore.”[FN4] Charting a course through this universe of federal law, which is expanding at an ever-accelerating rate, can be difficult. Attorneys and judges sometimes overlook a statutory provision, a regulation, or a decision that directly controls a case. We have all done it occasionally. It happened in this case.
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    1. The parchment pages containing the Constitution are 28 and 3/4 inches by 23 and 5/8 inches. The Bill of Rights parchment page is 28 and 1/2 inches by 28 and 1/4 inches.

    2. This number is based on the 2012 edition of the United States Code, excluding volumes 35 through 41 (which contain conversion tables and indices) and annual supplements.

    3. Those numbers are based on the latest official statistics from the Office of the Federal Register. See Office of the Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations – Total Pages 1938 Through 1949, and Total Volumes and Pages 1950 Through 2013, https://www.federalregister.gov/uplo...1-1-1-2013.pdf (last visited Jan. 27, 2015).

    4. Genesis 22:17 (New Living Translation); see also Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye 315 (Vintage Books 1988) (1953) (“[Lawyers] write the laws for other lawyers to dissect in front of other lawyers called judges so that other judges can say the first judges were wrong and the Supreme Court can say the second lot were wrong. Sure there’s such a thing as law. We’re up to our necks in it.”). (last link added)
    A tip o' th' hat to John Wesley Hall FourthAmendment.com
    Last edited by Nightmare; 03-01-2015 at 05:25 AM.
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    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Essentially a drive-by posting.

    If there was a suggestion of how to remedy the situation (either from the article or from you) it would have been nice to have you put it out there for consideration. Otherwise, this is just another announcement that they sky is blue and water is wet.

    stay safe.
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

    Because stupidity isn't a race, and everybody can win.

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    It is not an "article" of journalism, but the first two paragraphs of the cited court case.

    The solution is based on a observation that few here will see. There is not a spit of pearl-jam difference among the parties, democrat, republican and libertarian, that make up the Ruling Party, they're all progressives writing law upon law in their effort to make-things-better.
    I am responsible for my writing, not your understanding of it.

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    Regular Member sudden valley gunner's Avatar
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    I didn't realize posting info without having a solution was frowned down upon....
    I am not anti Cop I am just pro Citizen.

    U.S. v. Minker, 350 US 179, at page 187
    "Because of what appears to be a lawful command on the surface, many citizens, because
    of their respect for what only appears to be a law, are cunningly coerced into waiving their
    rights, due to ignorance." (Paraphrased)

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    Quote Originally Posted by skidmark View Post
    Essentially a drive-by posting.

    If there was a suggestion of how to remedy the situation (either from the article or from you) it would have been nice to have you put it out there for consideration. Otherwise, this is just another announcement that they sky is blue and water is wet.

    stay safe.
    IMO the "solution" is against forum rules to suggest.

    Good thing the founders didn't have the internet to vent their frustrations on, and "voices" in the media pretending to speak for them, or they may have never acted.
    Last edited by Jeff. State; 03-01-2015 at 10:56 AM.

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    Accomplished Advocate color of law's Avatar
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    But the Constitution begat Congress, and Congress begat statutes lots and lots of statutes the current version of them fills 45,000 pages of the United States Code. Those statutes begat hundreds of administrative agencies, and many of those agencies begat regulations lots and lots of them. So many that the Code of Federal Regulations fills 235 volumes and is 175,000 pages long, give or take a few thousand pages.3 As the number of statutes and regulations has multiplied exponentially, so has decisional law. Supreme Court decisions fill 573 volumes of the official United States Reports, while federal court of appeals decisions fill 2,000 or so volumes of the Federal Reporter series.
    I got rid of my 2002 book addition of the United States Code. It was 35 feet tall. I have a 1935 addition of the United States Code. It's one book 4" thick, 2200 pages. Of federal crimes, Title 18, it is only 73 pages. No gun crimes.

    I also have a 1948 addition of the Ohio statutes. That book is 6" thick. The gun crimes are slim to almost none.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff. State View Post
    IMO the "solution" is against forum rules to suggest.

    Good thing the founders didn't have the internet to vent their frustrations on, and "voices" in the media pretending to speak for them, or they may have never acted.
    While the thread was probably better posted in the Social Lounge, we do have a few comments about law from Founders. Here's one directly on this thread's topic:

    It will be of little avail to the people that the laws are made by men of their own choice if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood. James Madison.

    A quick internet search for some biographical information about him will tell you what his solution was.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

    There is no human being on earth I hate so much I would actually vote to inflict government upon him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen View Post
    While the thread was probably better posted in the Social Lounge, we do have a few comments about law from Founders. Here's one directly on this thread's topic:

    It will be of little avail to the people that the laws are made by men of their own choice if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood. James Madison.

    A quick internet search for some biographical information about him will tell you what his solution was.
    Welcome back Citizen.

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