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Thread: Best Gunsmithing Tools?

  1. #1
    Campaign Veteran since9's Avatar
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    Best Gunsmithing Tools?

    I've been looking at gunsmithing tools. I've owned my primary weapon for more than five years and like everything I've owned for any length of time, including three other firearms, it's time to take it apart.

    The thing of it is, I already own a decent set of screwdrivers from large to nearly microscopic, torx, hex, etc. Under these circumstances, is a kit like this really necessary? Does anyone have any better recommendations?

    As for the pins, there's a lot of pins! Are pins fairly standardized or unique to each firearm? Can pins be reused, or should they be replaced upon removal? Aside from the firearm manufacturer, where might I obtain reliable pins?

    I'm fairly certain I'll have to augment with a good hammer and punch set. What else might I be missing?

    Thanks in advance!
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    I repaired and maintained small instruments and machines in the Navy's nuclear equipment refurbishment 2S program. Pins, roll and solid, are a mature and reliable technology. Whether a manufacturer adheres to standards is another question. I don't recall ever having to modify or custom make a pin and doubt that it could be successfully done for a roll pin.

    The point of making roll pins from spring steel is to allow their reuse. I still have my personal copy of Industrial Press's Machinery's Handbook.
    Last edited by Nightmare; 04-29-2015 at 06:03 AM.
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    If your removing and resetting roll pins a good roll pin punch set makes the job a lot easier.

    Depending on what fire arm models some require specialize tools for some things put those are model specific.

    The biggest problem when dealing with very small parts IMHO is losing them I like a magnetic tray to put them in.

    More then once spring or ball detent would fly off into no where.

    So if you don't have spares available be careful.
    Last edited by Firearms Iinstuctor; 04-29-2015 at 07:15 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare View Post
    I repaired and maintained small instruments and machines in the Navy's nuclear equipment refurbishment 2S program. Pins, roll and solid, are a mature and reliable technology. Whether a manufacturer adheres to standards is another question. I don't recall ever having to modify or custom make a pin and doubt that it could be successfully done for a roll pin.

    The point of making roll pins from spring steel is to allow their reuse. I still have my personal copy of Industrial Press's Machinery's Handbook.
    I collect old books, and one of my favorite is Faires' "Design of Machine Elements" (1938). I picked it up for $4, but it's worth a good deal more than that.

    Thanks for the info on the roll pins. If they go in snug, I think I'll be fine. If not, I can always get some black roll pins from Brownells.

    Quote Originally Posted by Firearms Iinstuctor View Post
    If your removing and resetting roll pins a good roll pin punch set makes the job a lot easier.

    Depending on what fire arm models some require specialize tools for some things put those are model specific.

    The biggest problem when dealing with very small parts IMHO is losing them I like a magnetic tray to put them in.

    More then once spring or ball detent would fly off into no where.

    So if you don't have spares available be careful.
    Thanks for your input, FI. Good tips.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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    One thing that I have found that's worth it's weight in gold for disassembling firearms and keeping small springs and such local is a Space Bag.

    Get one larger than you need for what you're working on so that you can get your hands (and a small tool or two) in there, and the springs and detents are contained.

    Hope this helps.

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    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Yes, gunsmithing screwdrivers are a necessity, unless you are willing to accept the 99.99% probability that you will bugger up screw heads and the surrounding material.

    Ask me why I know.

    Maybe not as extensive a range of bits. But yes. Actually, most folks I know get by with fewer than 6 hollow-ground screwdrivers.

    stay safe.
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    Well,,,

    I agree with skid and it sounds like you already have the screw drivers a guy could need...

    You DO need a selection of punches they dont need to be fine quality just the right size!
    A guy with a selection of nails a hacksaw and a file can make a selection of punches for his gun/s.
    Pins are not usually that tight!

    One thing you have not asked about is a bench block,,, to support the gun as you drive the pin through.

    Again,, a guy could just drill the right size holes in the right locations in a 2 X 4 to support his work.


    Seems funny to me,, owning a gun for several years and only now thinking about taking it apart...
    I usually tear down any new to me gun within a day or two!

    PS... Use the BAG trick!!!!!
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    Since you didn't identify what your primary weapon is, you should research the appropriate procedure to disassemble it. I'm not a gunsmith by any means, but I have seen where some pins are directional, meaning they should be punched and inserted from a specific side. If available check several different YouTube videos on the subject in addition to a manual if you have one.

    In regards to tools, you can always get away with not using the appropriate tool for the job, but having them makes it a lot easier. That's why they make them. Good luck!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidmark View Post
    Yes, gunsmithing screwdrivers are a necessity, unless you are willing to accept the 99.99% probability that you will bugger up screw heads and the surrounding material.

    Ask me why I know.
    Lol, I can imagine. I've stripped my share of flat heads.

    Maybe not as extensive a range of bits. But yes. Actually, most folks I know get by with fewer than 6 hollow-ground screwdrivers.

    stay safe.
    Ok, so perhaps that $55kit with more than 50 drivers is a bit of overkill.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1245A Defender View Post
    I agree with skid and it sounds like you already have the screw drivers a guy could need...

    You DO need a selection of punches they dont need to be fine quality just the right size!
    A guy with a selection of nails a hacksaw and a file can make a selection of punches for his gun/s.
    Pins are not usually that tight!
    Nah. I have most other things I need. Sure, I could machine 'em with various penny nails, a drill, and a #10 Mill Bastard file, but it's nice to get gifts for one's birthday, even if I'm buying them myself.

    One thing you have not asked about is a bench block,,, to support the gun as you drive the pin through.

    Again,, a guy could just drill the right size holes in the right locations in a 2 X 4 to support his work.
    Well, I've pounded a few thousand nails, so that shouldn't be too hard. I built my son's loft. My uncle's house...

    Seems funny to me,, owning a gun for several years and only now thinking about taking it apart...
    I usually tear down any new to me gun within a day or two!
    I do too, but there was this funny piece of paper that came with the darn thing that I just couldn't ignore...

    CZ Limited Five-Year Warranty

    It expired last Fall, but I've been uber-busy with school. No time to think about it, much less do it. I have a little time now, so it's time to have a little fun! After all, what could go wrong? It's only 66 parts...

    Quote Originally Posted by Arin Morris View Post
    Since you didn't identify what your primary weapon is, you should research the appropriate procedure to disassemble it.
    You mean like an owner's manual? It shows the exploded diagram. That's usually enough.

    I'm not a gunsmith by any means, but I have seen where some pins are directional, meaning they should be punched and inserted from a specific side. If available check several different YouTube videos on the subject in addition to a manual if you have one.
    Thanks. That's very good advice, particularly with respect to the uni-directional pins.

    In regards to tools, you can always get away with not using the appropriate tool for the job, but having them makes it a lot easier. That's why they make them. Good luck!
    More tools = more fun. Besides, it's an excuse to upgrade my three hand-held tool chests to a unified one on rollers for Christmas!
    Last edited by since9; 04-30-2015 at 05:41 AM.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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    Please delete. Duplicate.
    Last edited by since9; 04-30-2015 at 05:20 AM.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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