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Thread: permitted events held on public property

  1. #1
    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    permitted events held on public property

    This question pertains to the effect SB175 will have on event permits. As some of you know, some jurisdictions here in Southern Nevada REQUIRE that a permittee bar people from bringing "weapons" into the event, even though it's held on public property, and is sometimes free to attend. Also worth noting; "firearms" and "weapons" are defined differently in this state, not sure how that distinction applies.

    Will CC, Las Vegas or any other subdivision still be able to require permittee to bar firearms once SB175 goes into effect? I'm not sure if this practice is codified by some County Code, city ordinance, etc. or if it's some administrative rule that some moon bat, city manager thought would be a great idea.
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  2. #2
    Regular Member The Big Guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada carrier View Post
    This question pertains to the effect SB175 will have on event permits. As some of you know, some jurisdictions here in Southern Nevada REQUIRE that a permittee bar people from bringing "weapons" into the event, even though it's held on public property, and is sometimes free to attend. Also worth noting; "firearms" and "weapons" are defined differently in this state, not sure how that distinction applies.

    Will CC, Las Vegas or any other subdivision still be able to require permittee to bar firearms once SB175 goes into effect? I'm not sure if this practice is codified by some County Code, city ordinance, etc. or if it's some administrative rule that some moon bat, city manager thought would be a great idea.
    Not knowing for sure but I'd go with the moon bat. What would be the difference between renting a park shelter to a private party and renting a city building to a private concern? I think that a private business renting public space could set their own rules, but I don't see how the city could demand it as a condition of the rental agreement.

    TBG
    Life member GOA and NRA. Member of SAF, NAGR, TXGR and Cast Bullet Assoc.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Big Guy View Post
    Not knowing for sure but I'd go with the moon bat. What would be the difference between renting a park shelter to a private party and renting a city building to a private concern? I think that a private business renting public space could set their own rules, but I don't see how the city could demand it as a condition of the rental agreement.

    TBG
    So I have been very strong on the "private property" camp for years... If you are law abiding... Check this out:

    NRS 207.190  Coercion.

    1.  It is unlawful for a person, with the intent to compel another to do or abstain from doing an act which the other person has a right to do or abstain from doing, to:

    (a) Use violence or inflict injury upon the other person or any of the other person’s family, or upon the other person’s property, or threaten such violence or injury;

    (b) Deprive the person of any tool, implement or clothing, or hinder the person in the use thereof; or

    (c) Attempt to intimidate the person by threats or force.

    2.  A person who violates the provisions of subsection 1 shall be punished:

    (a) Where physical force or the immediate threat of physical force is used, for a category B felony by imprisonment in the state prison for a minimum term of not less than 1 year and a maximum term of not more than 6 years, and may be further punished by a fine of not more than $5,000.

    (b) Where no physical force or immediate threat of physical force is used, for a misdemeanor.

    [1911 C&P § 475; RL § 6740; NCL § 10424]—(NRS A 1967, 522; 1979, 1455; 1995, 1239)
    If you have a right to bear arms... Anyone who trespasses you AND admits it because you are bearing arms, (Your right) is arguably guilty of section 1(b) It could be worthwhile to go to a casino, get it all on video, and see if the law works both ways!

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