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Thread: Prosecutor jailed for wrongfully convicting a man

  1. #1
    Regular Member stealthyeliminator's Avatar
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    Prosecutor jailed for wrongfully convicting a man

    I'm sure this comes to no surprise to any member here, but apparently prosecutors (or police officers) that engage in misconduct in trial are rarely ever punished, and are sometimes rewarded instead, even if the misconduct sends innocent people to jail. In this case, it seems as though just a sliver of justice was finally obtained, so many years later.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-g...b_4221000.html
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    Regular Member Grim_Night's Avatar
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    In today's deal, Anderson pled to criminal contempt, and will have to give up his law license, perform 500 hours of community service, and spend 10 days in jail. Anderson had already resigned in September from his position on the Texas bench.
    So the wrongly convicted man loses 25 years of his life, while Anderson goes to jail for 10 days and serves 500 hours of community service? Yeah, that's totally fair... /sarcasm
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    Regular Member solus's Avatar
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    here is an excellent example of DA arrogance from last week's 60 minutes segment... watch the DA's comments beginning at 7:30 >

    i couldn't see straight after hearing his comments

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/30-years...on-60-minutes/

    watch the whole thing and you'll just shake your head at the end wondering WTF is wrong with our judicial system.

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    Either we are equal or we are not. Note the sources, The Innocence Project via HuffPo. Note the preserved (dated) prison tattoos on the linked pages (NSFW).
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    Regular Member OC for ME's Avatar
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    What makes today's plea newsworthy is not that Anderson engaged in misconduct that sent an innocent man to prison. Indeed, while most prosecutors and police officers are ethical and take their constitutional obligations seriously, government misconduct--including disclosure breaches known as Brady violations--occurs so frequently that it has become one of the chief causes of wrongful conviction.
    Oh man...too funny.

    Wait for it...
    What's newsworthy and novel about today's plea is that a prosecutor was actually punished in a meaningful way for his transgressions.
    This guy is killing me...way too funny. In a meaningful way...please stop!
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    Regular Member stealthyeliminator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC for ME View Post
    Oh man...too funny.

    Wait for it...This guy is killing me...way too funny. In a meaningful way...please stop!
    It is more meaningful than the status quo. Albeit, given the state of the status quo, it doesn't take much to be more meaningful.

    Like I said, just a sliver of justice.
    Last edited by stealthyeliminator; 10-19-2015 at 02:49 PM.
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    Radley Balko, and perhaps, Will Grigg, have written about prosecutorial abuses--and the lack of accountability. Google is your friend in these things.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stealthyeliminator View Post
    I'm sure this comes to no surprise to any member here, but apparently prosecutors (or police officers) that engage in misconduct in trial are rarely ever punished, and are sometimes rewarded instead, even if the misconduct sends innocent people to jail. In this case, it seems as though just a sliver of justice was finally obtained, so many years later.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-g...b_4221000.html
    Antonin Scalia is on record as saying that there is no proof America ever executed an innocent man. Weasel words if I ever heard any.

    The Innocence Network has won the exoneration of some 250 people in recent years, mainly by forcing DNA testing. Some of those people were on death row. The man in the OP was on death row.

    Some prosecutors fight tooth-and-nail to prevent the Innocence Network from re-opening a case. A common refrain from prosecutors fighting the Innocence Network is, "He was convicted by a jury of his peers..."

    Back in the 1990's, Todd Wallingham was convicted of capital murder based in large part on the testimony of arson experts (his kids died in a house fire). He was eventually put to death. While he was on death row, the "science" of burn patterns that was used to convict was called into question by the arson investigation industry. Basically, they figured out certain burn patterns on floors were not caused by accelerants (gasoline, kerosene); they were cause by super-heated air charging across a ceiling with sufficient velocity to travel down the walls and burn the floor. This was all developed while Wallingham was still on death row. Texas refused to review the case in light of the new discoveries, and executed him. Notably, the warden in charge of killing Wallingham has gone public saying he is no longer convinced Wallingham was guilty. Now that is saying something. Radley Balko covered this case quite a bit.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

    There is no human being on earth I hate so much I would actually vote to inflict government upon him.

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    Accomplished Advocate color of law's Avatar
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    I guess this prosecutor has never heard of the legal maxim "Justice delayed is justice denied."

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    Regular Member Rusty Young Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stealthyeliminator View Post
    It is more meaningful than the status quo. Albeit, given the state of the status quo, it doesn't take much to be more meaningful.

    Like I said, just a sliver of justice.
    Nothing but fumes by comparison. Toxic, toxic fumes. I see your point though.


    What else is to be expected when success is measured by the number of prosecutions, not the upholding of the law?
    Last edited by Rusty Young Man; 10-20-2015 at 07:06 PM.
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