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Thread: Link for recalls of the traitors. Sign the petition!

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    Regular Member bloodstone1311's Avatar
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    Link for recalls of the traitors. Sign the petition!


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    Quote Originally Posted by bloodstone1311 View Post
    Link for recalls of the traitors. Sign the petition!
    https://www.change.org/p/citizens-of...share_petition
    In 1869-70 there was an agitation to prosecute the leaders of the Confederacy for Treason. Notice this was 4-5 years after the war.

    A fella named Lysander Spooner, who was also an abolitionist, wrote of series of essays in 1870 called No Treason wherein he utterly destroyed the arguments of those calling for prosecution.

    One of these days, I shall have to work out for myself whether an oath of office violated is treason or fraud. Or, both.
    Last edited by Citizen; 12-22-2015 at 11:08 PM.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

    There is no human being on earth I hate so much I would actually vote to inflict government upon him.

  3. #3
    Accomplished Advocate color of law's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen View Post
    In 1869-70 there was an agitation to prosecute the leaders of the Confederacy for Treason. Notice this was 4-5 years after the war.

    A fella named Lysander Spooner, who was also an abolitionist, wrote of series of essays in 1870 called No Treason wherein he utterly destroyed the arguments of those calling for prosecution.

    One of these days, I shall have to work out for myself whether an oath of office violated is treason or fraud. Or, both.
    Either way, once the oath is intentionally violated they must be removed from office to never sit in a position of trust.

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    Campaign Veteran since9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen View Post
    In 1869-70 there was an agitation to prosecute the leaders of the Confederacy for Treason. Notice this was 4-5 years after the war.

    A fella named Lysander Spooner, who was also an abolitionist, wrote of series of essays in 1870 called No Treason wherein he utterly destroyed the arguments of those calling for prosecution.

    One of these days, I shall have to work out for myself whether an oath of office violated is treason or fraud. Or, both.
    According to Article III, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, it is most certain not treason, at least in and of itself.

    As for whether or not it constitutes fraud, that depends on intent: "In law, fraud is deliberate deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain." Without intent, the best thing one can say about those who fail to uphold their oaths of office is that they're stupid.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by since9 View Post
    According to Article III, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, it is most certain not treason, at least in and of itself.

    As for whether or not it constitutes fraud, that depends on intent: "In law, fraud is deliberate deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain." Without intent, the best thing one can say about those who fail to uphold their oaths of office is that they're stupid.
    I do not recall signing that document, nor do I recall Mr. Spooner having done so.

    Perhaps you should read his book.

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    Regular Member OC for ME's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by since9 View Post
    According to Article III, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, it is most certain not treason, at least in and of itself.

    As for whether or not it constitutes fraud, that depends on intent: "In law, fraud is deliberate deception to secure unfair or unlawful gain." Without intent, the best thing one can say about those who fail to uphold their oaths of office is that they're stupid.
    High crimes and misdemeanors...misdemeanors...hmm...
    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson.

    "Better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer" - English jurist William Blackstone.
    It is AFAIK original to me. Compromise is failure on the installment plan, particularly when dealing with so intractable an opponent as ignorance. - Nightmare

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