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Thread: What should EMS providers consider before carrying a concealed weapon on duty? EMS1

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    What should EMS providers consider before carrying a concealed weapon on duty? EMS1

    A Kansas law, which became effective on July 1, 2016, makes it legal for firefighters and EMS personnel to have a concealed carry weapon while on duty. The only exception is for school zones or private buildings specifically marked or designated as 'gun free.' Public employers, such as city and county governments, cannot prohibit their employees from carrying on duty.

    We asked EMS1 columnists to react to the legislative change in Kansas and to answer this question, "As an EMS leader, educator and advocate what is the one thing EMS providers should consider before carrying a concealed weapon in the ambulance?"

    http://www.ems1.com/ems-products/per...eapon-on-duty/

    Linked in the left hand box is

    EMS body armor: What providers need to know

    http://www.ems1.com/body-armor/artic...-need-to-know/
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    Regular Member solus's Avatar
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    uh, if the first responder gets to the location, runs to the victim(s), then sees signage ~ do they tell the vic(s) wait a moment i have to put my firearm back in the bus?

    then the bad guys watching the bus see where the first responder put their firearm, they can avail themselves of it?

    so many things wrong with this...

    ipse

    some (read most) of our EMS would need to buckle to vests together ~ just saying

    added: on second thought wasn't there a discussion on this forum about the bloody first responder and fire fighters DO NOT enter the scene 'until clear' by LE? if so why on earth would they need vests or firearms?
    Last edited by solus; 08-10-2016 at 10:50 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare View Post
    A Kansas law, which became effective on July 1, 2016, makes it legal for firefighters and EMS personnel to have a concealed carry weapon while on duty. The only exception is for school zones or private buildings specifically marked or designated as 'gun free.' Public employers, such as city and county governments, cannot prohibit their employees from carrying on duty.
    ...
    The only problem I see is with the needlessly large number of off limits locations. Is a gun magically more dangerous in a school zone? Is the EMT or firefighter less trustworthy in a school? It isn't like those axes and other rescue equipment carried by the fire fighters, or the host of drugs, needles, and field surgical equipment carried by EMTs are inherently safer than a firearm.

    Private buildings can have private policies. They should not be backed up by law in most cases, and if someone calls the paramedics, fire department, or cops to come help with something, they should expect those folks are going to bring whatever equipment with them they think they need, including a personal defensive weapon. An exception should be in order in the rare cases where a private gun ban might warrant some backing of law.

    Prisons and jails already have lock boxes for cops' guns. No reason EMTs can use those. But maybe a decent idea to have a quick access lock box in the vehicle that can secure the gun (and various drugs) when needed.

    Some good advice in article, including mindset and weapons retention in confined spaces.

    Years ago at an SOF convention in Vegas one vendor was showing off their ability to armor plate emergency vehicles against gunfire so as to protect the occupants. I understood this for police vehicles. But being young and na´ve I couldn't image why you'd need to protect a fire truck or ambulance against gun fire. "Some of these animals will shoot at anything that moves in their neighborhoods. Sometimes the arsonists really wants to see a building burn rather than a fire being put out," was the response from the vendor.

    Bottom line, first responders often have to go into very dangerous situations. Protocols of waiting for the police to secure a location don't always work. And the guy who makes his living as a paramedic or fire fighter has as much right to defend his life and limb as does anyone else.

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    Regular Member Freedom1Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by utbagpiper View Post
    The only problem I see is with the needlessly large number of off limits locations. Is a gun magically more dangerous in a school zone? Is the EMT or firefighter less trustworthy in a school? It isn't like those axes and other rescue equipment carried by the fire fighters, or the host of drugs, needles, and field surgical equipment carried by EMTs are inherently safer than a firearm.

    Private buildings can have private policies. They should not be backed up by law in most cases, and if someone calls the paramedics, fire department, or cops to come help with something, they should expect those folks are going to bring whatever equipment with them they think they need, including a personal defensive weapon. An exception should be in order in the rare cases where a private gun ban might warrant some backing of law.

    Prisons and jails already have lock boxes for cops' guns. No reason EMTs can use those. But maybe a decent idea to have a quick access lock box in the vehicle that can secure the gun (and various drugs) when needed.

    Some good advice in article, including mindset and weapons retention in confined spaces.

    Years ago at an SOF convention in Vegas one vendor was showing off their ability to armor plate emergency vehicles against gunfire so as to protect the occupants. I understood this for police vehicles. But being young and na´ve I couldn't image why you'd need to protect a fire truck or ambulance against gun fire. "Some of these animals will shoot at anything that moves in their neighborhoods. Sometimes the arsonists really wants to see a building burn rather than a fire being put out," was the response from the vendor.

    Bottom line, first responders often have to go into very dangerous situations. Protocols of waiting for the police to secure a location don't always work. And the guy who makes his living as a paramedic or fire fighter has as much right to defend his life and limb as does anyone else.

    Charles
    Simple, if the place is a gun free zone, then they cannot expect an EMT response.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare View Post
    A Kansas law, which became effective on July 1, 2016, makes it legal for firefighters and EMS personnel to have a concealed carry weapon while on duty. The only exception is for school zones or private buildings specifically marked or designated as 'gun free.' Public employers, such as city and county governments, cannot prohibit their employees from carrying on duty.

    We asked EMS1 columnists to react to the legislative change in Kansas and to answer this question, "As an EMS leader, educator and advocate what is the one thing EMS providers should consider before carrying a concealed weapon in the ambulance?"

    http://www.ems1.com/ems-products/per...eapon-on-duty/

    Linked in the left hand box is

    EMS body armor: What providers need to know

    http://www.ems1.com/body-armor/artic...-need-to-know/
    <chuckle> Oh, that was brilliant. (sarcasm).

    Let's hope a school doesn't burn.

    And, lets hope when firefighters or EMS arrives to a private business, they take three seconds to look over the front entrance for a gun-busters sign...and then walk away if there is one!!!! (sarcasm)

    Oh, man. What a bad day for somebody who has a heart attack while working for an anti-gun business.

    Jeezus!! And, these people are entrusted to formulate law!?!
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    In the mid-Eighties I trained as an EMT, privately on my own dime, competing for a slot in the class with professionals. Things were so much simpler then. We were cautioned in our medical-legal-ethics class on the commitment of advertising with the Star of Life, as on our cars. Dr. Norm McSwain was my mentor.
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