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Thread: Credit card fraud question, Spotify from Apple Pay, Card Not Present CNP

  1. #1
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    Credit card fraud question, Spotify from Apple Pay, Card Not Present CNP

    Has anyone else become suspicious of these associations?

    I just cancelled the third CC in three months for a fraudulent charge.
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    Regular Member solus's Avatar
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    mem serves, you got a new ipad...did you turn off approval for purchases and auto update of apps by turning restrictions on and going down the list turning ALL app, apples and third party off?

    if not, then your new toy was buying you presents...

    just a thought to ponder

    ipse
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    Regular Member solus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare View Post
    You didn't notice how specific was my question, --edited by Moderator-- .
    specificity was oblique, at best...

    but it was pleasant & nice to see your kind words flowed anyway over an observation...

    ipse
    Last edited by Grapeshot; 08-11-2016 at 12:50 PM. Reason: edited quote
    I'm only human; I do what I can; I'm just a man; I do what I can; Don't put the blame on me; Don't put your blame on me ~ Rag'n'Bone Man.

    Please do not get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am ~ my attitude depends on who you are and how you act.

    Remember always, do not judge someone because they sin differently than you do!

    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain

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    If so, then I pray he takes it to heart, though with faint hope.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightmare View Post
    Has anyone else become suspicious of these associations?

    I just cancelled the third CC in three months for a fraudulent charge.
    Oh, yeah.

    I about went through the roof a few years ago when, upon walking up to the tellers window of my bank, I saw a wide banner offering "identity theft" protection for a fee.

    I won't post my thoughts when I saw that banner. My keyboard would go up in flames.

    You see, there is no such thing as "identity theft". No one can steal your "identity". You are you. You are unique.

    However, someone can obtain and misuse the bits of information that tie to you.

    But, even if someone does, you are not the victim. The victim is the merchant or credit card company. They are the victims of fraud, not you. You can never be the victim of fraud if someone pretends to be you. No, really. I mean this. Think about it. You cannot possibly be the victim of fraud of someone pretending to be you. If someone walked up to you and claimed to be you, you would pretty quickly figure out something is up!

    Identity theft is a transfer of victimhood. The financial industry created it out of thin air. They are the victims of fraud when someone pretends to be you. You are not the victim; they are.

    But, their whole arrangement of making money (interest payments and credit card transaction fees) is out the window if they have to verify the person using your identifiers is really you. They can't do it. Their business model would collapse if they had to be able to prove who made the transaction. And, their credit rating agencies--Inspirion, Transwhatever, etc--would be out of business if they had to be able to prove that transactions you didn't make were actually made by you. The only way a credit business model would work is if the fraud came down to a low level--a level where you were personally known at least by sight at the local department store when using the department store credit card. The scammer could get away with pretending to be you to a new clerk who didn't know you. Or, the grocery store. Or, the dry goods store. Or,...(you get the idea). But, that is all the fraud that would happen. The scammer would have to hope the department store employee didn't recognize you by sight.

    But, no. In order to sustain their system...and legitimize/make valid the credit ratings of the credit agencies--they have to make you prove you did not make the purchase (that is why "identity theft" is such a massive headache--you have to prove a negative in order to restore your creditworthiness.) In order to sustain the validity of that picture, they have to make you the victim of fraud, when it is actually them who are the victims.

    And, they set themselves up for it. In order to make money--lots of it--of course. Think about it. If courts laughed at them for not verifying the purchaser is really you, their whole money-making scheme would collapse. If they had to actually know their customer, for real, they couldn't do it. Their whole system would collapse. It just wouldn't be viable.

    So, to protect themselves--and their money making scheme--they transfer victimhood to you. Identity theft.

    None of us. No one (capital letters) owes it to the financial services industry to let themselves be the victims of fraud just so individual people in the financial services industry can make a buck. They're transferring the victimhood of fraud from themselves to others in order to maintain their status quo, which is to say, so they can keep making money. Money that none of us owes them a living for.

    So, yeah. I am massively suspicious of any company whose core angle is preventing, identifying, short-circuiting, or cleaning up identity theft for a fee. Massively suspicous.
    Last edited by Grapeshot; 08-12-2016 at 12:49 AM. Reason: rule #19 in quote
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    Regular Member Freedom1Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen View Post
    Oh, yeah.

    I about went through the roof a few years ago when, upon walking up to the tellers window of my bank, I saw a wide banner offering "identity theft" protection for a fee.

    I won't post my thoughts when I saw that banner. My keyboard would go up in flames.

    You see, there is no such thing as "identity theft". No one can steal your "identity". You are you. You are unique.

    However, someone can obtain and misuse the bits of information that tie to you.

    But, even if someone does, you are not the victim. The victim is the merchant or credit card company. They are the victims of fraud, not you. You can never be the victim of fraud if someone pretends to be you. No, really. I mean this. Think about it. You cannot possibly be the victim of fraud of someone pretending to be you. If someone walked up to you and claimed to be you, you would pretty quickly figure out something is up!

    Identity theft is a transfer of victimhood. The financial industry created it out of thin air. They are the victims of fraud when someone pretends to be you. You are not the victim; they are.

    But, their whole arrangement of making money (interest payments and credit card transaction fees) is out the window if they have to verify the person using your identifiers is really you. They can't do it. Their business model would collapse if they had to be able to prove who made the transaction. And, their credit rating agencies--Inspirion, Transwhatever, etc--would be out of business if they had to be able to prove that transactions you didn't make were actually made by you. The only way a credit business model would work is if the fraud came down to a low level--a level where you were personally known at least by sight at the local department store when using the department store credit card. The scammer could get away with pretending to be you to a new clerk who didn't know you. Or, the grocery store. Or, the dry goods store. Or,...(you get the idea). But, that is all the fraud that would happen. The scammer would have to hope the department store employee didn't recognize you by sight.

    But, no. In order to sustain their system...and legitimize/make valid the credit ratings of the credit agencies--they have to make you prove you did not make the purchase (that is why "identity theft" is such a massive headache--you have to prove a negative in order to restore your creditworthiness.) In order to sustain the validity of that picture, they have to make you the victim of fraud, when it is actually them who are the victims.

    And, they set themselves up for it. In order to make money--lots of it--of course. Think about it. If courts laughed at them for not verifying the purchaser is really you, their whole money-making scheme would collapse. If they had to actually know their customer, for real, they couldn't do it. Their whole system would collapse. It just wouldn't be viable.

    So, to protect themselves--and their money making scheme--they transfer victimhood to you. Identity theft.

    None of us. No one (capital letters) owes it to the financial services industry to let themselves be the victims of fraud just so individual people in the financial services industry can make a buck. They're transferring the victimhood of fraud from themselves to others in order to maintain their status quo, which is to say, so they can keep making money. Money that none of us owes them a living for.

    So, yeah. I am massively suspicious of any company whose core angle is preventing, identifying, short-circuiting, or cleaning up identity theft for a fee. Massively suspicous.
    Finally, someone who has nailed it.

    Although, poor gal up here in Washington ended up with warrants for her arrest due to someone in California committing crimes while claiming to be this gal in Washington. She had to go to her local Sheriff's office to get things straightened out. Only thing that saved her was the mugshot of the woman in California who was claiming to be her.

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  7. #7
    Accomplished Advocate color of law's Avatar
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    I use cash and buy a prepaid card (small amount) to put on my App Store account. That way it's not tied to my personal account and the dishonest thief gets little money. I say dishonest thief because some of these, so called, businesses believe they can deduct a (one time) purchase 2 and 3 times.

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    Quote Originally Posted by color of law View Post
    I use cash and buy a prepaid card (small amount) to put on my App Store account. That way it's not tied to my personal account and the dishonest thief gets little money. I say dishonest thief because some of these, so called, businesses believe they can deduct a (one time) purchase 2 and 3 times.
    Never having used one, I had not thought of a cash card. Hmmm...
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    Regular Member Maverick9's Avatar
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    Though I got refunded, I've had two banks tell me that the gubmint required they charge a fee on a checking account that had not been used in a year or so.

    One 'changed' their rule and said under $50 and no transactions' was a service charge. But I said 'you guys email me all sorts of things, you couldn't be bothered to email me this 'change'.

    Another outright lied and said 'gubmint' required it. I went there in person and got refunded and they were 'angry'. Wut?

    They hope you won't check. But I check.

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    Negative Rates for the People Arrive as German Bank Gives In

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...-bank-gives-in

    Terminating low activity accounts is effective negative interest rate overdrawing the account.
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