Story From The Kansas City Star


Under a Kansas law on self-defense, taking effect Thursday:

A person engaged in a lawful activity "in a place where such person has a right to be" has no duty to retreat and has "the right to stand such person's ground and meet force with force."

A person who uses justifiable force is immune from criminal prosecution and lawsuits, unless the person against whom force was used is a law enforcement officer who was on duty and the officer identified himself or the person using force should have known that the person was a law enforcement officer.

A person is justified in using force against an aggressor if he believes that such force is necessary to defend himself or another person against the "imminent use of unlawful force."

Someone is justified in using deadly force when he reasonably believes it is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself or another person.

A person is justified in using force if he reasonably believes such force is necessary to prevent someone else's unlawful entry into his dwelling or occupied vehicle.

A person is justified in using deadly force to prevent unlawful entry into any dwelling or occupied vehicle if he reasonably believes deadly force is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm.