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Thread: GLOCK 21

  1. #1
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    I'm considering the purchase of a GLOCK 21 and was wondering if anyone who owns a21 (not compensated) can share their opinion on pros & cons, likes or dislikes. And, what mods-within reason-would you recommend? Sights?

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    I own a G20, (two, actually) which is essentially the same gun as the G21 you are considering, just chambered in 10mm. I shoot revolvers quite a bit, so I initially found the grip a bit thick, but have since grown accustomed to it. If it feels comfortable, you will likely be very happy with it, as it is a quality weapon. I shoot tight groups with mine, and it comes back on target very quickly even with the added recoil of the 10mm round - an issue you will not have with the 45 ACP.

    I'm sure others have had different experiences, but I strongly discourage the Ghost "rocket" trigger connector. It lightens the trigger pull slightly, decreases over-travel, and does improve accuracy a bit. The advertisement sounded so great that I bought one for each G20. (Can you say, "SUCKER!!"?) I had already uneventfully fired a couple thousand rounds combined through them, so took both in for Ghost installation. In hindsight, I should have done them one at a time. Both had misfires due to light primer strikes during post-modification proving tests, which continued, despite repeated trips back to the gunsmith who installed them. I have taken them out of service, and am waiting for the original parts to be reinstalled. Glock makes a factory 3.5# trigger connector, but they were (and still are) on backorder when I bought my Ghosts. Otherwise, I would not have purchased a custom-fit aftermarket part when a Glock factory drop-in unit functions essentially the same. I now patiently wait - live and learn.

    Although not a Glock fan, per se, I have found that their full size models tend to come from the factory pretty much the way I like them. Other than the trigger connector if you desire a lighter trigger pull (not necessary, stock 5.5# is fine), and perhaps night sights, I have no mods to recommend. My $0.02.

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    Except for some good night sights, I don't recommend any aftermarket parts either.

    I currently own a G17, G23, and G30 and have found them all to be great right out of the box.

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    Irecently picked up a G-34 and the factory trigger was just not as good as my G-27's trigger. I purchased and installed the Ghost Ultimate trigger in the G-34 and it made a very positive change. One note, the Ultimate trigger is NOT recommended for a carry gun, it is designed to be used in competition, just like the G-34.

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    After handling a G-21 a couple of times, the slide release seems a bit difficult to use. Is this common for most/all glocks or is it just me? Will the factory installed (Option) slide release cure the problem?

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    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    After handling a G-21 a couple of times, the slide release seems a bit difficult to use. Is this common for most/all glocks or is it just me? Will the factory installed (Option) slide release cure the problem?
    Difficult to use how? Personally, I don't use the slide release for anything. If I'm going to release the slide, I use an overhand grip with my left hand, pull back, and release. Much easier to do under stress since it is a gross motor function.

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    Don't use the slide release for anything but "administrative" actions. If you're doing an emergency reload (ie: slide locked back during a fight): 1) insert the loaded magazine, 2) reach over the slide (knuckles up), 3) pull slightly back and let it slam forward.

    The reason one should do it this way is because the slide is much larger than a little button. When you're scared, your blood is full of adrenaline and your heart is beating at 130+/minute, it becomes very difficult to do simple tasks. Grasping a big blocky slide is much easier. Practice this until it's second nature. At some point, you'll just stop using the slide release button.

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    I recently acquired a Glock 21. It has its pros and cons.

    PRO:

    1) 13 round magazine
    2) Large grip and good angle
    3) Long barrel
    4) Glock trigger reset
    5) Glock features: no sharp edges, big mag well, etc

    CON:

    1) Overall huge size
    2) Grip is uncomfortable for many people
    3) Wide, blocky slide is more difficult to conceal
    4) Magazines are very large

    The very long grip is difficult to conceal without lots of forward cant. It tends to print under just a t-shirt. However, a good holster can mitigate most of this.

    I have noticed that the gun is uncomfortable while sitting in a car with bucket seats.

    It shoots very well. The large grip absorbs recoil and I can get some very fast double taps. There is enough grip there to allow for a very solid hold, especially under recoil. I didn't like the grip in the beginning, but I now appreciate them.

    If I were to change anything, it would be the connector. I would put a 3.5# connector to improve it. Ignore the lawyer's warnings; the pull weight will be around 4 pounds.


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    cREbralFIX wrote:
    I recently acquired a Glock 21. It has its pros and cons.

    PRO:

    1) 13 round magazine
    2) Large grip and good angle
    3) Long barrel
    4) Glock trigger reset
    5) Glock features: no sharp edges, big mag well, etc

    CON:

    1) Overall huge size
    2) Grip is uncomfortable for many people
    3) Wide, blocky slide is more difficult to conceal
    4) Magazines are very large

    The very long grip is difficult to conceal without lots of forward cant. It tends to print under just a t-shirt. However, a good holster can mitigate most of this.

    I have noticed that the gun is uncomfortable while sitting in a car with bucket seats.

    It shoots very well. The large grip absorbs recoil and I can get some very fast double taps. There is enough grip there to allow for a very solid hold, especially under recoil. I didn't like the grip in the beginning, but I now appreciate them.

    If I were to change anything, it would be the connector. I would put a 3.5# connector to improve it. Ignore the lawyer's warnings; the pull weight will be around 4 pounds.


    In aprevious post I mentioned the slide release is difficult to use. Your recent reply suggests you know exactly what I was talking about. When Iinspecteda G-21 at a local gun shop, there were a couple of times I could not get the release to work. This would be bad news for Emergency reloads.

    What are (briefly) the lawyer's warnings? And, is there a web site where I may review the warning?

    Did your G-21 come with 1 or 2 mags?

    Thanks for all the info cREbralFIX.


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    Yeah, basically, I never use the slide release on *any* firearm for anything other than maintenance activities.

    Use the back of the slide as your slide release for emergency reloads and leave the button alone. Every trainer I ever went to told me to do this and it makes sense.

    What are (briefly) the lawyer's warnings? And, is there a web site where I may review the warning?
    The warnings generally come from the manufacturer of the part. Glock won't sell them individually for some silly reason. What's to prevent someone from using a Glock 34 or 35 as a defensive weapon? DUH.

    I just purchased a Sherer 3.5# Trigger Pull Connector. Here is their warning:

    "No liability is expressed or implied for damage or injury which may result from not installing it properly or from improper use of this product. We are not responsible for your stupidity or ignorance. This connector reduces the trigger pull to approximately 3.5 pounds. It is recommended that the connector be installed by a certified Glock armorer and, at this time, have him thoroughly check out the pistol's operation. Installing these parts may invalidate your Glock warranty. Be careful in the use of this product".

    Well, no **** Sherlock! But, wait, there's more. They RANT:

    "For well over a hundred years, police as well as the general public were and still are considered capable of shooting a revolver in the single action mode. The single action trigger pull in a good revolver is usually 3.5 to 4 lbs. A good semi-automatic pistol often has a trigger pull in this range. Glock provides a 3.5 lb. trigger pull in their long slide competition pistols. They will not provide this trigger connector in their other pistols or sell it separately. Scherer is now providing a connector of approximately 3.5 lbs. pull for all Glock pistols. This will allow competent competition shooters to shoot their Glock pistols with the same precision as their long slide Glock competition guns."

    WELL! I installed the connector and it felt the same! Doh!


    Did your G-21 come with 1 or 2 mags?
    My Glock came with 12 magazines because I bought it used. A new Glock should come with two magazines. If it does not, the dealer removed one and is trying to steal a few extra dollars from you. Accuse that dealer of theft, walk out, and call Glock.

    ***

    As for other folks' comments about 3.5# connectors are to be used only for competition: BS.

    We're big boys and girls and can handle a gun safety. What makes us suddenly forget everything about gun safety when the trigger weight changes?

    NOTHING. ABSOLUTELY NOTHING! GUN SAFETY IS IN THE HEAD, NOT THE MACHINE!

    Gunsmiths across this country do trigger jobs by tens of thousands annually (or more). Some of the best DEFENSIVE setups I have seen have been 3.5-4.0 pound pulls on 1911's and revolvers.

  11. #11
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    My Glock came with 12 magazines because I bought it used. A new Glock should come with two magazines. If it does not, the dealer removed one and is trying to steal a few extra dollars from you. Accuse that dealer of theft, walk out, and call Glock.


    This was/is myconcern with a new purchase.

    Thanks Again


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    I had a Glock 21 and enjoyed it for many years. It operated perfectly; no problems. I purchased it along with a Glock 30 (also 45), and so I used both for carry purposes as the same magazines would work in both (if they were for the 21). This enabled me to use the G30 for my main carry piece and have 13 rounds of 45 caliber mags which was very nice as a backup. The 30 is about the same size as a 19. I am not a very good shot and the best FBI statistics say that most people only hit about 20-25% of what the shoot at. If I ever was going to shoot at something in self defense, I want to be able to have the best odds at winning.

    Alas, I gave up my Glock 45s to my brother who expressed an interest in the both. I had and went to My H&K USP 45 full size to replace the Glock 21, they used the same holster and felt about the same in your hand. Of the two I think I actually preferred the feel of the H&K and the nice extras, but both shot about the same really (and the H&K only has 10 round mags).

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    I've had a 21 for about 5 years now. It is my favorite gun to take to the range. I've never carried it as I'm a good bit on the heavy side, and I don't think I could conceal it well. The only thing I've done to mine is have night sights installed and I put a Hogue Handall over the grip.

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    I carry the Glock 21 most of the time, sometimes a Glock 27. My preferred modifications for any Glock are:

    (1) Glock night sights

    (2) 3.5# connector (which lowers the measured pull to 4#)

    (3) competition trigger spring (further lowers the measured pull to 3.5#).

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    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    After handling a G-21 a couple of times, the slide release seems a bit difficult to use. Is this common for most/all glocks or is it just me? Will the factory installed (Option) slide release cure the problem?

    I assume you are writing about thumbing the slide stop lever to chamber a round from a magazine. I find that most of the time when I seat a new magazine, the act of slapping it in causes the slide to be released, which I think is an excellent feature, particularly when I'm on the clockin IDPA competition.

    I shoot left-hand, so the slide stop lever is on the wrong side for me, anyway. I prefer to grip the slide, retract it fully, and let it zip forward on its own, just like it does after each shot before the magazine is empty.

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    Anubis wrote:
    I find that most of the time when I seat a new magazine, the act of slapping it in causes the slide to be released, which I think is an excellent feature, particularly when I'm on the clockin IDPA competition.
    Welcome, Anubis!

    Both of my G20's do this as well, and have done so since new. My Glock Armorer says that they aren't supposed to do it, and replaced the slide release levers on both, but nothing changed. I also like this, even if it isn't supposed to happed, as long as it doesn't cause other problems like the slide not locking back when the mag is empty.

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    Thank you, it's good to be here. This is one of the better forums.

    My little G27 has only closed "automatically" once or twice, but both my G21s do it nearly every time. I have changed out the slide stop levers on both--due to wear--and it still happens. I think it's caused by the fact that the Glock's grip axis is far from perpendicular to the slide axis. So when you slap in the magazine, part of the force is along the slide axis, which compresses the recoil spring slightly, just enough to let the slide stop lever spring push it down.

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    I got my Glock 21 in August 1990 and I love it.

    I bought a Colt 1911 in 1967 and tried to shoot it until 1990. After waiting 19 months for Glock to get the 40 S&W out to the police departments...

    I got one of the first 6 to come into our area. I can shoot 200 percent better with it than with my old 1911.

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    cREbralFIX wrote:
    Yeah, basically, I never use the slide release on *any* firearm for anything other than maintenance activities.

    Use the back of the slide as your slide release for emergency reloads and leave the button alone. Every trainer I ever went to told me to do this and it makes sense.
    I see the reasoning in that statement and have heard instructors say the same thing but how does one get the magazine out in the first place? I use my thumb on my Glock 17 and 23, and I use the same digit that I use to release the slide. Its faster and in my experience has always worked for me. YMMV

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    longwatch wrote:
    ...how does one get the magazine out in the first place?
    I can shoot with either hand, but prefer and usually shoot left. While keeping the barrel pointed downrange, I rotate my hand on the grip so the tip of the left index finger presses the magazine release. For right-hand, thumbing the release is much quicker and easier.

    Glock's my fave; unfortunatelythey don't make an ambidextrous magazine release.

    From either side, as I mentioned earlier, slapping in the new magazine closes the G21 slide, so I don't need to choose how to release the slide. On my G27, which doesn't usually close itself on insertion of new magazine, I fully retract and release the slide to let it grab the next round and close, exactly like it does between shots. I note in passing that the Glock manual names part number 27 the "slide stop lever", not the "slide release lever".

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    Founder's Club Member - Moderator longwatch's Avatar
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    The slide closes automatically on your Glock? I believe it but I've never seen a pistol do that. It may be the Slide Stop Lever but that doesn't mean it wasn't intended to also release the slide. The fact that Glock makes extended slide lock levers makes me think Glock thinks its OK to use it that way. Also, I think there is also a chance of riding the slide and causing a jam when using the method advocated by instructors.

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    Regular Member Anubis's Avatar
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    longwatch wrote:
    The slide closes automatically on your Glock?
    Yes, on 2 different G21s, and with 4 different standard-length slide stop levers. It's a real advantage when reloading on the IDPA clock.

    I have read reports of others having the same experience with full size Glocks.

  23. #23
    Founder's Club Member - Moderator longwatch's Avatar
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    Well as long as it works that way 100% of the time, I can see the advantages of that. However the one time it doesn't could cost you. My 17 and 23, like your 27 don't though do that and I train accordingly. Do you know if that is an intentional design feature in the 21?

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    longwatch wrote:
    Do you know if that is an intentional design feature in the 21?
    I don't know, but I suspect it is not an intentional feature.

    If the slidedoesn't close itself, I know how to close it manually.



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    longwatch wrote:
    The slide closes automatically on your Glock? I believe it but I've never seen a pistol do that. It may be the Slide Stop Lever but that doesn't mean it wasn't intended to also release the slide. The fact that Glock makes extended slide lock levers makes me think Glock thinks its OK to use it that way. Also, I think there is also a chance of riding the slide and causing a jam when using the method advocated by instructors.
    I'm not aware of Glock making any such product. There are several other companies that make aftermarket parts for Glocks, so could one of these companies be what you're talking about?

    I'm confused by your "riding the slide and causing a jam" statement. Are we talking about the same thing here?

    To use the overhand release method, continue to hold your weapon in a safe direction with your shooting hand. With you other hand forming a "C", place it over the top of your slide with the pads of your hand in contact with the slide, and your fingers in contact on the other side. Pull back the slide to it's full travel and release, letting the slide snap forward under it's own power. How can this cause a jam when it is used to clear a jam in the Tap, Rack, Bang drills?

    As far as the Glock slide automatically closing, this can be accomplished on most Glocks with the muzzle held at an appropriate angle and a firm slap of seating the magazine. This is not an intentional feature, and I would never rely on it to save my ass.

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