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Thread: Lanyards?

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    Founder's Club Member - Moderator longwatch's Avatar
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    As retention is an issue with open carry, has anyone considered or used a pistol lanyard. When I was in the service I have seen them used regularly, but I have used one only when I CCW while running. Any opinions pro or con?

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    Did you make your own?

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    This website is a good resource on making lanyards out of Parachute / 550 Cord

    http://stormdrane.blogspot.com/

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    Founder's Club Member - Moderator longwatch's Avatar
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    I have made my own out of shock cord, and have bought Keltecs lanyard kit for my P3AT.

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    State Researcher Kevin Jensen's Avatar
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    I have thought about getting a Glock lanyard for my 23. I have not done so yet because I thought it might look a little like those silly wallet chains! I suppose I coude tuck the extra length into my back pocket.


    "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life." Robert A. Heinlein

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    If I lose a retention fight for my pistol I don't want my fat happy a$$ then attached to that pistol and the BG who now is in posession of it. I want to free to run far away and dive behind a stone wall.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    Founder's Club Member - Moderator longwatch's Avatar
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    You can probably put a breakaway on the lanyard in that event.

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    longwatch wrote:
    You can probably put a breakaway on the lanyard in that event.
    But then how is that going to help with retention? I've never used a lanyard or had any retention training involving a lanyard so I just don't know how that would work.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    Founder's Club Member - Moderator longwatch's Avatar
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    There is retention in the gun grab sense and retention in case its dropped or the user gets tackled or something. I'd think a lanyard could be useful in either but more so in the latter case.

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    Also, in CQC, you run the risk of the gun being knocked from your hand. A lanyard would keep it from flying across the room and give you chance to regain control of the weapon. I personally don't use one, but I can see the merit in it.

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Thanks for the responses. I hadn't thought about it in those terms.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    nm

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    you do realize the lanyard attatches to the user's wrist, right?
    Not sure what type of lanyard you're using. Most pistol lanyards attach to the belt, and are stretchy. We also used these during deployment, and were taught retention techniques. You'd be suprised how easy it is to snap your gun out of the BG's hands with your lanyard. Even if they do manage to hold on to it, it's very difficult for them to aim and shoot when you're pulling on the gun with the lanyard, plus they can't get away with your gun.

    I own a lanyard from deployment, and while I've considered using it for daily carry, I never have. The threat of losing my sidearm just doesn't seem to warrant it for myself. I'd probably use my lanyard if I was hiking or hunting.

    An interesting idea that just came to mind is a lanyard that is attached to something that, when removed, renders the gun useless. The benefit would be that if someone DID get your gun, all you'd have to do is pull your lanyard and voila, gun no go bang. The draw-back would be that someone could theoretically grab your lanyard and disable your gun if they knew what they were doing.

    Thoughts?

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    I have a leather one which is pictured here:

    http://webideas.com/tokarev/images/attack.gif

    ...it came with my Tokarev TTC pistol (which is my OC gun).

    ZA RODINU! (за родину!)



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    (formerly of Colorado Springs, CO)

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    I would only buy/use a lanyard for hiking-type excursions. I'm not expecting to get in a tussle while holstered, and I'd never draw and then walk into CQB range. If I'm ever in a life/death position of having to draw from CQB, then it's hipfires to persuade the attacker to back away, or at least down.
    -Unrequited

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    Regular Member Marco's Avatar
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    Outside ofthe military never used one, never considered it either.
    If you think like a Statist, act like one, or back some, you've given up on freedom and have gone over to the dark side.
    The easiest ex. but probably the most difficult to grasp for gun owners is that fool permission slip so many of you have, especially if you show it off with pride. You should recognize it as an embarrassment, an infringement, a travesty and an affront to a free person.


    ~Alan Korwin

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    I've been thinking about this a bit. There just aren't many modern pistols with mounting points for a lanyard out there in the civilian market. This use just can't be very common.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    Regular Member Marco's Avatar
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    There just aren't many modern pistols with mounting points for a lanyard out there in the civilian market.
    :?
    Glocks have a hole at the base of the grip that I believe was designed as a lanyard hole

    As do older 1911, modern ones offer a option that allows the use of a lanyard with a replacement mainspring housing.

    Sigs have a lanyard hole as well.

    The HK P2000 has a lanyard hole as well.



    EDIT:
    Pics removed everyone got the point.

    If you think like a Statist, act like one, or back some, you've given up on freedom and have gone over to the dark side.
    The easiest ex. but probably the most difficult to grasp for gun owners is that fool permission slip so many of you have, especially if you show it off with pride. You should recognize it as an embarrassment, an infringement, a travesty and an affront to a free person.


    ~Alan Korwin

  19. #19
    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Agent19 wrote:
    There just aren't many modern pistols with mounting points for a lanyard out there in the civilian market.
    :?
    Glocks have a hole at the base of the grip that I believe was designed as a lanyard hole

    As do older 1911, modern ones offer a option that allows the use of a lanyard with a replacement mainspring housing.

    Kind of hard to see from this pic but Sigs have a lanyard hole as well.

    The HK P2000 has a lanyard hole as well.
    That may be a lanyard mounting point on the Glock. I never thought about it's purpose and just wrote it off to an artifact from molding. 1911s while certainly, as you point out, have the option to be configured for a lanyard, the vast majority of them I see do not have this feature. I know at least some of the Sig "P" series have the lanyard hole build into the stock grips but from the few examples I have seen and judging by pictures, I don't think any of the wood grip models do. I wasn't aware of the H&K having it but I am not surprised. It appears from photos, that the P99s have a hole in the back of the grip that may be for that purpose as well. The XDs don't have one. Meh, I'll concede it is probably more prolific than I was thinking.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

  20. #20
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    Yep, the P99/SW99's do have a lanyard attachment point. it's actually the pin that holds the grip insert in, but it is specifically described as a lanyard point as well. M9's (beretta) have them too, of course.

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    DreQo wrote:
    you do realize the lanyard attatches to the user's wrist, right?
    Not sure what type of lanyard you're using. Most pistol lanyards attach to the belt, and are stretchy.
    that's part of why I edited my reply to, "nm." I spoke out of turn & said to myself, "geeze, maybe I haven't looked into lanyards enough to make a comment here. I'm just glad you were so fast with the reply button :P

    Anyway, in a defencive situation (no "if's" just going along the lines that it's going to be a good shoot), why let the bg close enough to let him get a hand on your weapon? The handgun was drawn, showing you felt the need for use of deadly force. If the bad guy's still coming, then why haven't you shot him in the face, yet?

    If the gun was "grabbed" by a bad guy coming from behind, it shows a need to increase situational awareness.

    Anyway ...whatever you decide, man, it's cool with me

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    One could say that the BG should never be close enough to get your weapon. This, of course, depends on the fact that it's a western style shoot-out and there's no one else around. In a real situation you may very well have random people around you. Someone may just swipe at your gun because they're trying to be a hero and don't know what the hell is going on.

    I've already said I don't personally think there's a high enough risk to warrant a lanyard during normal activities. To say that you're just plainwrong if a BG gets close enough to warrant the lanyard, though, is in and of itself wrong.

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    Although my HK has a place for one, I have never practicedwith one and with my luck in a SHTF scenarioI would likely get tangled up in it.

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    If you run out of ammo you could use it to swing your weapon around and whomp the BG upside the head with it.

  25. #25
    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Good and bad points, depending on your perspective: a lanyard can be used as a garrot. Personally, a handgun lanyard does not fit into the image I wish to project - just more unusual hardware. Also LEOs do not seem to feel the necessity of utilizing them - at least not in this country.

    Now a short loop of cord on my knife is a different story - one that I am considering.

    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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