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Thread: Citizen kills murderer of police officer

  1. #1
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    Ski star's cousin kills cop, then gets killed


    Story Highlights• Suspect shoots, runs over officer after traffic stop
    • Passing motorist stops, kills suspect with officer's gun
    • Dead suspect was cousin of Olympic skier Bode Miller
    • Officer and suspect had tangled previously during an arrest


    FRANCONIA, New Hampshire (AP) -- A cousin of skiing star Bode Miller fatally shot and ran over a police officer, then was killed by a passer-by who grabbed the officer's gun.

    Liko Kenney shot Cpl. Bruce McKay four times and ran over him after a traffic stop Friday evening, state Attorney General Kelly Ayotte said. Gregory Floyd, who was driving by with his son, grabbed McKay's gun and shot Kenney when he refused to put his gun down, Ayotte said.

    Kenney, 24, was convicted of assaulting McKay and resisting arrest in 2003. Ayotte had no other details of that previous incident between the men, and rejected suggestions the officer should have let someone else handle the traffic stop given his history with the driver.

    Officials said McKay pulled Kenney over for speeding on Route 116. Kenney took off, and McKay pursued him for about 1½ miles before pulling in front of Kenney's car and pushing it off the road.

    The officer used pepper spray on Kenney and his passenger and then turned around and was shot, Ayotte said Saturday at a news conference in Concord. Soon after, Floyd arrived and confronted Kenney while his son called for help using the officer's radio.

    Authorities said Floyd was justified in shooting Kenney.

    The McKay, 48, was a 12-year veteran of the Franconia Police Department.

    "It really tears at the fabric of the community and the fabric of the state," said Gov. John Lynch, who visited the town of about 900 residents Saturday as people paid their respects and brought flowers to a police station.

    Bode Miller's father, Woody Miller, said there was a history of animosity between the officer and his nephew.

    "They had a long relationship," said Miller, who operates an international tennis camp in nearby Easton. "There's been physical altercations between them before in the course of being arrested."

    Miller said Kenney, who lived next door to him, didn't have a steady job, but often took work cutting firewood and picking fiddlehead ferns, a wild green that grows in the region and is considered a delicacy.

    Bode Miller, who once bailed his cousin out of jail, was on his way home to Franconia, his father said. Miller was in Park City, Utah, this week, meeting with officials of the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association. At that meeting, the former Olympic medalist told officials he was cutting his ties with the U.S. team.

    The shooting happened near this town in the White Mountain National Forest, popular with skiers and tourists who visited the Old Man of the Mountain, a rock formation and the state's symbol that crumbled into pieces four years ago.

  2. #2
    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    It's always a tragic, sickening thing when a peace officer is killed in the line of duty.

    That said, something is missing from this story so far, both in how KenneyandCpl.McKay met up again and how Floyd managed to shoot Kenney.

    Here's another reporting:

    http://www.unionleader.com/article.aspx?headline=AG%3A+A+private+citizen+kill ed+police+officer's+murderer&articleId=e283499 c-a08e-4f8f-8e3f-d3cd26253755






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    Ya... when I read it.. It seemed to be missing something. The story in my mind just was not complete.

    I guess some details are not worth telling.

    I just wonder why Kenney was still there when Floyd arrived and obtained the officer's gun.

    The notion that "someone else" should have stopped Kenney based on prior contact between Kenney and the officer is absurd!!

    I wonder how Kenney got the drop on the officer too and was able to shoot him 4 times. Something tells me that he was not wearing a vest. Many departments make you buy your own and wearing them is often times optional.


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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    Based on this rather poorly written account, it would seem that the suspect must have had a gun in the car and may have shot the LEO when he walked up to the car.

    I too am curious as to why he hung around long enough to be taken down by a passing citizen. I can imaging how the citizen might have gotten the LEOs weapon, but I can't understand why the suspect just stood there while he did so.

    It also does not say if there was an actual exchange of fire between the citizen and the suspect. You would think that for the prosecutor to determine that it was a righteous shooting, there would have to have been some threat to the citizen made by the suspect. Pointing the gun, shooting at him ... something.

    Perhaps more will come out in a few days.

    Regards
    "Research has shown that a 230 grain lead pellet placed just behind the ear at 850 FPS results in a permanent cure for violent criminal behavior."
    "If you are not getting Flak, you are not over the target"
    "186,000 Miles per second! ... Not just a good idea ... It's the law!"

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    LEO 229 wrote:
    Many departments make you buy your own and wearing them is often times optional.

    That is just wrong. Seattle was like that until my dad was killed. He wasn't wearing his vest because it no longer fit and the dept. was not issuing kevlar, he had a lead vest, to the older officers only the new ones. They changed thier policy after my dad was killed and it is now a suspendable offense if an officer is found not wearing a vest on duty.

    My personal opinion is that the dept shoud be held somewhat liable for his death if he did not have a vest on and there was no policy enforcing it.
    "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity."

    "though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for I know that you are by my side" Glock 23:40

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    Hawkflyer wrote:
    You would think that for the prosecutor to determine that it was a righteous shooting, there would have to have been some threat to the citizen made by the suspect. Pointing the gun, shooting at him ... something.
    I would imagine that the prosecutor would deem it justifiable even if there was no threat posed to the citizen that killed the shooter based on the facts that he had just shot an officer and was at a severe threat to the well being and safety of the entire scociety. Heck all he would have to do is say "He made a furty movement". That would be enough under the circumstances to justify the shooting.
    "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity."

    "though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for I know that you are by my side" Glock 23:40

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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    joeroket wrote:
    Hawkflyer wrote:
    You would think that for the prosecutor to determine that it was a righteous shooting, there would have to have been some threat to the citizen made by the suspect. Pointing the gun, shooting at him ... something.
    I would imagine that the prosecutor would deem it justifiable even if there was no threat posed to the citizen that killed the shooter based on the facts that he had just shot an officer and was at a severe threat to the well being and safety of the entire scociety. Heck all he would have to do is say "He made a furty movement". That would be enough under the circumstances to justify the shooting.
    No argument here. It just seems that we really don't know what happened. The reported or the editor of this story really did not do their homework at all. The story just has a lot of gaps.

    But if the guy was just standing there, and the citizen just walked up took the LEOs weapon and shot the guy. That would not be a justifiable shooting under most state laws on deadly force. It is obvious that this citizen will be cut some very substantial slack, and rightly so.

    Regards
    "Research has shown that a 230 grain lead pellet placed just behind the ear at 850 FPS results in a permanent cure for violent criminal behavior."
    "If you are not getting Flak, you are not over the target"
    "186,000 Miles per second! ... Not just a good idea ... It's the law!"

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    Hawkflyer wrote:
    Based on this rather poorly written account, it would seem that the suspect must have had a gun in the car and may have shot the LEO when he walked up to the car.

    I too am curious as to why he hung around long enough to be taken down by a passing citizen. I can imaging how the citizen might have gotten the LEOs weapon, but I can't understand why the suspect just stood there while he did so.

    It also does not say if there was an actual exchange of fire between the citizen and the suspect. You would think that for the prosecutor to determine that it was a righteous shooting, there would have to have been some threat to the citizen made by the suspect. Pointing the gun, shooting at him ... something.

    Perhaps more will come out in a few days.
    I hope more does come out. Too much missing information. Somebody's hiding something right now. Probably the FPD.




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    Just saw this on Instapundit
    www.instapundit.com

    I WOULD HOPE NOT:
    New Hampshire authorities said yesterday that they will not press charges against a former Marine who stepped into a deadly shooting and killed a 24-year-old high school dropout who had moments earlier fatally shot a police officer.
    The former Marine, Gregory W. Floyd, 49, was driving with his son along Route 116 in Franconia on Friday night when he saw Liko Kenney, 24, shoot Franconia Police Corporal Bruce McKay, 48, four times in the torso. After Kenney drove his Toyota Celica over McKay as the officer lay on the ground, Floyd grabbed the officer's service weapon and shot and killed Kenney. . . .
    The elder Floyd drove his Tahoe into a spot between McKay and Kenney as a shield and told his son, who is in his late teens, to run to the officer's cruiser and radio for help.
    The elder Floyd picked up McKay's gun from the ground and ordered Kenney to drop his weapon. Kenney refused, and Floyd saw Kenney appear to be reloading, Conte said. Floyd then shot and killed Kenney, Conte said. . . .
    New Hampshire's attorney general, Kelly A. Ayotte, said Floyd will not face charges because he was justified in using deadly force.
    I would say that deadly force was not merely justified, but actively called for. Good for him.


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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    If those are the facts, the citizen and his son deserve a medal for their actions.

    Regards
    "Research has shown that a 230 grain lead pellet placed just behind the ear at 850 FPS results in a permanent cure for violent criminal behavior."
    "If you are not getting Flak, you are not over the target"
    "186,000 Miles per second! ... Not just a good idea ... It's the law!"

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    I second that! My thoughts are with the officer, his family and Mr. Floyd and his son. We all know that this was not somethingMr.Floydwanted to do or how he probably wanted to spend that day with his teenage son. He did what he had to.

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    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    Here's a better written article with a little more detail. But still some important gaps in the info available.

    The lack of information about and from Kenney's passenger is quite glaring. Somebody's hiding something.






    Conflicting images emerge of slain police officer, shooter
    May 13, 2007

    FRANCONIA, N.H. --Condolences poured in Sunday to the families and friends of a veteran police office gunned down by a local man who, in turn, was fatally shot by a passing driver trying to protect the fallen officer.

    Police Cpl. Bruce McKay, 48, was shot four times by Liko Kenney, 24, after a traffic stop Friday evening, police and prosecutors said. Kenney then ran over the officer and was shot by witness Gregory Floyd when Kenney refused to drop his gun, according to authorities.

    McKay, who had a 10-year-old daughter and 14-year-old stepdaughter, planned to be married in July atop Cannon Mountain ski area in town of about 900 residents.

    "This terrible tragedy has impacted families, the Franconia area and the entire state of New Hampshire," Gov. John Lynch said in a statement. "My thoughts and prayers, and those of my wife, Susan, are with the family of Corporal McKay, whose courage, service and commitment to protecting others is an example for us all."

    Kenney and McKay knew and disliked each other. Kenney, whose cousin is famous skier Bode Miller, had been convicted of assaulting McKay in 2003, and Kenney's family said the officer had broken Kenney's jaw when he responded to an underage party several years ago.

    "They had bad blood going for a long time," said Kenney's uncle, Bill Kenney.

    Some area residents felt McKay was too tough on young people in town.

    "He was a local law enforcement officer in a small town and he felt he was doing what was right," said Tom Palmer, who owns the Stoney Brook Motel. "He created some hard feelings in town, but we were friends with him and he was always very professional with us."

    Police Sgt. Mark Taylor said McKay had been on the force for 12 years. He was the prosecutor for the department, which has three full-time officers and three part-time officers.

    The Rev. Gary Hart of the Community Church said that during a harsh storm last month, McKay went out of his way to make sure the town's elderly residents were safe and helped coordinate shelter arrangements. But, Hart told the New Hampshire Sunday News, "some thought he was rigid in coming down on the side of the law."

    "It's hard to be a police officer in a small town," Hart added. "He gave his heart and soul to the job before he gave his life to it."

    Bill Kenney described McKay as a "rogue cop" who had target his nephew and family for years.

    "McKay stomped on him when he was a teenager," he said, referring to the party incident several years ago. Kenney's family said he tried to pursue the matter in court but nothing came of it because there were no other witnesses.

    Bill Kenney described his nephew as troubled, but not violent.

    "He was definitely part of the family, but we all had a little bit of a tenuous relationship with Liko," he told the Concord Monitor. "I consider him a loose cannon, volatile."

    Kenney was born in Easton but spent much of his early years in Hawaii, where his parents own a coffee plantation. His uncle said he had rough upbringing and dropped out of school by 10th grade.

    Three weeks ago, Kenney started a new job at the Agway in Littleton. Owner Don Merrill said Kenney was a hard worker.

    "He got along beautifully with the customers," Merrill said. "He was learning all the ropes and doing quite well. He had a good future here."

    Rob Hayward knew both men well. He had been a friend of McKay's since McKay joined the police department, and Kenney had been a close friend of his son, who was killed in a car accident in 2005. Kenney still kept in touch with Hayward and visited him Friday morning.

    Hayward said McKay treated him with respect but said young people in town complained about problems with the officer. Kenney was "very, very afraid of Officer McKay," he said.

    "He was a good boy and I can't understand what brought it to this," he told the Monitor. "Officer McKay was a good officer. Those two had their problems, but I don't understand how it got so escalated."

    http://www.boston.com/news/local/new...ficer_shooter/


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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    HankT wrote:
    ...SNIP
    The lack of information about and from Kenney's passenger is quite glaring. Somebody's hiding something.
    SNIP...
    I agree, but I suspect he is in custody, and more than likely has been advised to keep quiet. I am only guessing but I would think he will be in a world of hurt when the attention of the authorities returns to his role in all this.

    Regards
    "Research has shown that a 230 grain lead pellet placed just behind the ear at 850 FPS results in a permanent cure for violent criminal behavior."
    "If you are not getting Flak, you are not over the target"
    "186,000 Miles per second! ... Not just a good idea ... It's the law!"

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    I'm surprised they didn't charge him with interfering with a police operation since they had to rule the shooting justified. I know out west there would be no such talk about "deciding not to charge him".Floyd would have a medal from the Sheriff and a parade in his honor.

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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    vermonter wrote:
    ...SNIP
    I know out west there would be no such talk about "deciding not to charge him".*
    SNIP...
    You are in for a bit of a surprise I fear. The west is not as open minded as you might think. In Texas there is NO OC. If you even profile a weapon through your cover garment you are in violation of the OC ban. They have outlawed the BOWIE KNIFE of all things. IN TEXAS, the very place where it became famous.

    In New Mexico you cannot carry at all in a place that sells alcohol. In practical terms that is a lot of places because almost every place sells liquor there. A lot of states in the west require retreat before using deadly force.

    So there is no surprise that someone might want to look at this incident for appropriate use of force. It seems that it was appropriate. But it might not have been if the guy was not holding a gun, had not refused to disarm and wasn't trying to reload when he was shot.

    Regards
    "Research has shown that a 230 grain lead pellet placed just behind the ear at 850 FPS results in a permanent cure for violent criminal behavior."
    "If you are not getting Flak, you are not over the target"
    "186,000 Miles per second! ... Not just a good idea ... It's the law!"

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    Hawkflyer wrote:
    HankT wrote:
    ...SNIP
    The lack of information about and from Kenney's passenger is quite glaring. Somebody's hiding something.
    SNIP...
    I agree, but I suspect he is in custody, and more than likely has been advised to keep quiet. I am only guessing but I would think he will be in a world of hurt when the attention of the authorities returns to his role in all this.
    They've had the guy in custody for almost 48 hours. The fact that the pressis saying nothing about the passenger probably means that FPD is saying nothing about him. Since the passenger had a bird's eye view of the whole sequence of events it is impossible to properly report or evaluate this case yet.

    Hawk, if FPD felt that the passenger had any direct complicity in the murder of a police officer, they would have charged his ass pronto. They've done everything else PDQ.

    Another part that is interesting me a great deal is the first stop. I wonder what's on that tape?

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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    HankT wrote:
    ...SNIP
    Another part that is interesting me a great deal is the first stop. I wonder what's on that tape?
    Well in my experience, everything you can see looking out the windshield, and all the audio from the radio, and possibly (depending on the installation) every thing that was said between the LEO and the suspect.

    If normal precedent holds in this case (and it may not) the passenger will likely be charged as an accomplice. Just as someone in a car that does a drive-by but never actually pulled the trigger. They are going to be asking this guy why he did not takes steps to stop the guy himself. In particular why he sat there while the car was driven over the LEO.

    But the reports indicate that the passenger was also maced. You have to ask what prompted that if it is true.

    Regards
    "Research has shown that a 230 grain lead pellet placed just behind the ear at 850 FPS results in a permanent cure for violent criminal behavior."
    "If you are not getting Flak, you are not over the target"
    "186,000 Miles per second! ... Not just a good idea ... It's the law!"

  19. #19
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    Hawkflyer wrote:
    HankT wrote:
    ...SNIP
    Another part that is interesting me a great deal is the first stop. I wonder what's on that tape?
    Well in my experience, everything you can see looking out the windshield, and all the audio from the radio, and possibly (depending on the installation) every thing that was said between the LEO and the suspect.
    Yah, I'm wondering what was actually said. One report I read said the cop killer demanded/requested another cop to do the ticket/stop. That doesn't sound like a cold-blooded killer. Presumably, the request/demand was due to the personal history between Kenney and the officer. It's probably crucial to understanding of the case what Kenney and McKay actually said at the first stop.


    Hawkflyer wrote:
    If normal precedent holds in this case (and it may not) the passenger will likely be charged as an accomplice. Just as someone in a car that does a drive-by but never actually pulled the trigger. They are going to be asking this guy why he did not takes steps to stop the guy himself. In particular why he sat there while the car was driven over the LEO.

    But the reports indicate that the passenger was also maced. You have to ask what prompted that if it is true.
    I'm sure it is likely/safer to charge the accomplice. But that it hasn't been done yet on a hot case says something, I think.

    Too much missing to determine that it was just a simple case of an unprovoked murder of an LEO.

    If it was that, of course, then Kenney got his just due.

    Lots of unanswered stuff. Interesting case.

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    joeroket wrote:
    LEO 229 wrote:
    Many departments make you buy your own and wearing them is often times optional.

    That is just wrong. Seattle was like that until my dad was killed. He wasn't wearing his vest because it no longer fit and the dept. was not issuing kevlar, he had a lead vest, to the older officers only the new ones. They changed thier policy after my dad was killed and it is now a suspendable offense if an officer is found not wearing a vest on duty.

    My personal opinion is that the dept shoud be held somewhat liable for his death if he did not have a vest on and there was no policy enforcing it.

    Some departments cannot even afford to buy VA state code books each year for their officers. The books are about $40 each and they have to get hand-me-downs from other departments.

    Keeping in mind... the books are not current and the laws have changed or been added. How can the LEO know the law when he is not given a current book. He will need to buy his own and that typically does not happen. They either share.... or use the first and only book they are issued.

    I feel that ALL LEOs should be issued a vest as a standard piece of their equipment.

    You cannot really enforce or require the vest to be worn. There are situations when it is not practical or essential. Example... a long funeral in the hot summer sun. I have done that and those that had on a vest just about died.

    Many supervisors stop wearing their vest too since they are behind the scenes and do not respond to danger. They coordinate the scene via radio and the first responder officers go.


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    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    LEO 229 wrote:
    joeroket wrote:
    LEO 229 wrote:
    Many departments make you buy your own and wearing them is often times optional.

    That is just wrong. Seattle was like that until my dad was killed. He wasn't wearing his vest because it no longer fit and the dept. was not issuing kevlar, he had a lead vest, to the older officers only the new ones. They changed thier policy after my dad was killed and it is now a suspendable offense if an officer is found not wearing a vest on duty.

    My personal opinion is that the dept shoud be held somewhat liable for his death if he did not have a vest on and there was no policy enforcing it.
    I feel that ALL LEOs should be issued a vest as a standard piece of their equipment.

    You cannot really enforce or require the vest to be worn. There are situations when it is not practical or essential. Example... a long funeral in the hot summer sun. I have done that and those that had on a vest just about died.
    LEO 229, given that Cpl. McKay was not wearing a vest, and that he was interacting with a person who had a conviction for assaulting him, why would he approach Kenney's car twice without taking proper precautions for the possibility that Kenney was armed? Even if that was acceptable procedure, why would McKay turn his back on a pair of trouble-makers that he'd just pepper sprayed?

    The picture is not clear yet.








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    HankT wrote:
    LEO 229, given that Cpl. McKay was not wearing a vest, and that he was interacting with a person who had a conviction for assaulting him, why would he approach Kenney's car twice without taking proper precautions for the possibility that Kenney was armed? Even if that was acceptable procedure, why would McKay turn his back on a pair of trouble-makers that he'd just pepper sprayed?

    The picture is not clear yet.
    As I recall... there was a history between the two. I feel the officer became complacent or took the guy for granted. There was a prior attack but it was hands only. I do not think the officer considered he would be shot.

    I wonder... does his department issued vests? If so... how often did the officer ever where it?

    I work with two officers that never wore theirs. One now wears his but only after peer pressure. The other is just a jack ass and says.. "It is in my trunk. I will wear it if I need it."

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    This is shaping up as a littlePeyton Place...

    I wonder how many times Floyd shot Kenney? I wonder what Kenney's passenger has to say about the double killing?

    I guess we'll get more of the details filled in after the funeral.



    Police Officer And Gunman Had A Stormy History

    BY AMY ASH NIXON, Staff Writer
    Tuesday May 15, 2007
    http://www.caledonianrecord.com/page...tory/86ae9db55






    Man's arrest in '03 seems to prefigure fatal confrontation

    May 16, 2007

    http://www.timesargus.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070516/NEWS01/705160361/1002/NEWS01


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    This case has become quite charged, with the FPD withholding information that would fill in the gaping holes in the incomplete story of how one LEO and one punk kid three weeks ago. Maybe now that the funeral is over, the full truth will come out.

    Caleb MacCauley, the passenger in cop killer's car is the key. So, perhaps, is the cruiser video.

    It would be reallybad to follow a terrible tragedy with a coverup of some kind.




    Even in tragedy, we must ask
    More facts will allow more informed view of shootings


    By MIKE PRIDE
    Monitor editor


    Many readers have complained about the Monitor's coverage of the shooting death of Police Cpl. Bruce McKay III in Franconia. They have especially criticized our editorial making the case that the police video of the events leading to McKay's death is a public record and should be released.


    This is a story bound to stir strong emotions. Like soldiers, police officers killed in the line of duty are worthy of public respect and honor regardless of the facts surrounding their deaths. McKay died upholding the law, a public servant making the supreme sacrifice.

    But the nature of the tragedy does not change the Monitor's responsibility in covering it.

    Our first duty is to find out what happened. We have had capable, veteran reporters doing just that since the shootings occurred.

    We reported as much as we know about what happened last Friday night during a traffic stop gone terribly wrong. We recounted the roughneck behavior of 24-year-old Liko Kenney, the man who killed McKay, and McKay's past efforts to bring Kenney to justice. As for Gregory Floyd, the man who shot Kenney after witnessing Kenney's fatal attack on McKay, we reported his record of threatening behavior and run-ins with the police.
    Although we provided extensive coverage of McKay's funeral and the accolades he received, we have not written a profile of McKay. In part, that is because writing such a story is not as easy a task as it might seem.
    Our reporters are not plugged in to Franconia the way they are plugged in to the Concord area. Some people who spoke with our reporters echoed a letter writer from Franconia who portrayed McKay as "an upstanding police officer" who looked out for local kids. Others had troubling things to say about his record. Because they would not allow their names to be used, we could not publish what they had to say.

    No person in a public role is without detractors, but we were not certain we could do a fair, balanced, truthful story on McKay's life and record. So we passed.

    Letter writers criticized us for not writing a laudatory profile and for reporting extensively on Floyd's past. Readers seemed to want to see this tragedy as an open-and-shut case with two heroes and

    one villain. That impulse is understandable, but life is not so simple.

    From a legal standpoint, the case was open and shut. Attorney General Kelly Ayotte reviewed the evidence and determined that Floyd had done nothing wrong in shooting McKay's killer. She and other law enforcement officials have been helpful in answering questions about the shootings, but they provided neither a detailed narrative of events nor the videotape made from McKay's cruiser.

    This led to the Monitor's Wednesday editorial calling for the release of these materials.

    Of all that we have written about the case, the editorial drew the strongest outcry. Writers called us disrespectful, and most advocated suppression of the tape. They were ready to accept the attorney general's conclusions without further information. "Could it be that you, the media, don't trust anyone?" one letter writer asked.

    A basic journalism dictum goes like this: "If your mother tells you she loves you, check it out." This operating philosophy for journalists serves the American system well. Public officials, no matter how capable they seem, should always be subject to press scrutiny. And just because we ask hard questions doesn't mean we expect the answers will cast anyone in a bad light.

    Ayotte is a fine attorney general. Both a Republican and a Democratic governor have appointed her, and the Monitor supported her reappointment. She may be absolutely correct in deciding that Floyd acted legally in shooting Kenney.

    And yet her exoneration of Floyd is a matter of judgment, and she did arrive at this judgment quickly. Furthermore, like other attorneys general before her, Ayotte may at some point seek major political office in New Hampshire. While I'm sure she would never consciously allow political considerations to affect her decision-making in a criminal matter, the decision Ayotte made in this case is sure to enhance her reputation as tough on crime and criminals.

    Those are the reasons it is important that the evidence behind that decision be made public. After a reasonable interlude, I think the attorney general's office will release the videotape and possibly other evidence.

    Although that is a correct and necessary decision, I do not look forward to the videotape's release. I can only guess at its content, but sadly, in the culture we live in, its broadcast is likely to be frequent and widespread.

    But whatever my qualms about that, I like less the crux of many of the opinions expressed by critics of the Monitor's coverage. This is that the less the public knows about the details, the better.

    For all the deep emotion the death of a police officer causes, and for all the honor due Cpl. McKay, the public should have as clear an understanding as possible of the facts surrounding this case. Only then will it have an informed view of what happened in Franconia and how the state handled the case.


    http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/p...TORY/705200349

  25. #25
    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    Here is a video of theshooting from the dashboard cam. Stunning.

    Cpl. McKay was murdered in cold blood, that much is clear.

    But why did he turn his back on a person who he a) knew to be potentially dangerous, and, b) someone he had just pepper sprayed (ineffectively), and c) when he was not wearing a protective vest?

    Something very odd about that. The only thing I can think of, and I admit it's a wild thought, is suicide by citizen. It would be a weird theory. Butsuch a theory wouldexplain almost everything that happened.

    http://www.myfoxkc.com/myfox/pages/N...p;pageId=3.3.1

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