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Thread: Cho Seung-Hui Had 377 Rounds

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    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    377 rounds. But how many 9mm and how many .22? How many of each fired?

    How many mags???? That's a crucial piece of information!

    Jeez, what incompetent reporting.

    But I do wonder about all the secrecy in this case. Secrecy usually means that the police are hiding something.



    May 21, 2007, 8:39PM
    Va. Tech gunman 'well-prepared' to go on


    By SUE LINDSEY Associated Press Writer
    © 2007 The Associated Press



    BLACKSBURG, Va. — The gunman who killed 30 people at a Virginia Tech building was "well-prepared" to continue his shooting spree with more than 200 additional rounds of ammunition, a state panel was told Monday.

    Police found 203 live rounds in Norris Hall, where Seung-Hui Cho killed 25 students and five faculty members before committing suicide on April 16, State Police Superintendent W. Steven Flaherty told a panel investigating the massacre. Cho also shot two other students elsewhere.

    "He was well-prepared to continue on," Flaherty said.

    Cho fired 174 shots from two handguns on the second floor in a span of nine minutes, taking his own life at 9:51 a.m. as police on the stairwell approached the floor, Flaherty said.

    Asked to describe Cho's shooting method, Flaherty said, "I would describe it as very deliberate. There seemed to be nothing panicky at all."

    Earlier, after hearing testimony from a Virginia Tech attorney that privacy laws prohibit release of students' mental health and other records, panel member Tom Ridge said the group needs to find a way to gain access to Cho's records.

    "We'd be remiss if we didn't do a real deep dive into this area," said Ridge, the former U.S. Homeland Security chief.

    Cho was found "mentally ill and in need of hospitalization" in December 2005, according to court papers. A judge ordered him into involuntary outpatient treatment, but there is no indication that Cho complied.

    University counsel Kay Heidbreder said student privacy rights prevent release of most records. Even within the university, the records cannot be shared among departments, she said.

    Ridge said that he understood that privacy rights are necessary, but that he believes in this case the panel should do what it can to get Cho's records.

    Panel chairman W. Gerald Massengill said the group would be willing to receive the information in closed session if necessary.

    Cho's family, which would have access to the records, has cooperated so far, Flaherty told reporters.

    Also Monday, the panel visited the two buildings where the shootings occurred. The tour included a more than two-hour private briefing, featuring a presentation by Virginia Tech police chief Wendell Flinchum, who led the initial response to the shootings.

    Such information will not be made public until police meet with victims' families, Flaherty said.

    It was helpful to hear about the shootings from people who were there and to view the shooting sites, Massengill said.

    "I've seen and heard a lot in my career," said Massengill, a former State Police superintendent who oversaw the agency's response to the Sept. 11 attack on the Pentagon and the 2002 Washington-area sniper attacks. "This is almost undescribable."

    The panel toured West Ambler Johnston Hall, the dormitory where the first two students were killed, and the classrooms of Norris Hall.

    The briefing and tour were closed under provisions of the Virginia Freedom of Information Act that protect students' privacy and briefings by law enforcement agencies. Reporters for several news organizations had objected, saying it did not appear the grounds for closing the meeting were properly applied.

    During the open portion of the meeting, Massengill asked Tech president Charles Steger whether he thought the contents of the first e-mail the school sent to students and employees should have been more specific. The mass e-mail sent at 9:26 a.m. — more than two hours after the first shooting — said police were investigating a shooting at West Ambler Johnston and warned students to be cautious and contact police about anything suspicious.

    Massengill asked Steger whether the e-mail should have said, "We've had a shooting and the shooter has not been apprehended."

    Said Steger: "The most prevalent question I get is that question."

    He said university officials were worried about causing panic on campus. Steger also noted that police initially thought the shooting was a domestic dispute, and officers already were questioning a person of interest.

    Gov. Timothy M. Kaine created the eight-member panel, asking it to gather information about the gunman, how the events unfolded, and how the state and other agencies responded.

    Additional meetings are set for next month. Kaine had said he hoped the panel could complete its review before classes resume in August. The university also is conducting its own review, which it expects to complete by late August.

    http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/...n/4824028.html


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    Why would the type of ammo and number of mags matter? 100 rnd mags or 1 rnd mags, same difference.... Nobody was able to resist so he could have brought a muzzleloader....

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    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    kurtmax_0 wrote:
    Why would the type of ammo and number of mags matter? 100 rnd mags or 1 rnd mags, same difference....
    Of course there is a difference.

    With regard to speed in reloading and Cho's estimation of the required preparedness. He had a limited timeinterval, don't forget. If he had, say, 300 rounds of 9mm with him when he walked into Norris Hall, he'd have had to have 20 G19 mags. That would be very interesting.

    If he had loose ammunition, that would boggle the mind.

    I still can't figure out why he had a .22. Makes absolutely no sense. I think he was nutz.

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    HankT wrote:
    SNIP Jeez, what incompetent reporting.
    Incompetent and manipulative reporting.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

    There is no human being on earth I hate so much I would actually vote to inflict government upon him.

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    Regular Member Kelly J's Avatar
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    HankT wrote:
    377 rounds. But how many 9mm and how many .22? How many of each fired?

    How many mags???? That's a crucial piece of information!

    Jeez, what incompetent reporting.

    But I do wonder about all the secrecy in this case. Secrecy usually means that the police are hiding something.


    Personally I fail to see what real importance the Quantity of ammo has to bear on this issue we know that the guy had planned this out pretty carefully, the first shooting to draw attention and the Police away from the second intended target, as to a 9mm or .22 Cal. weapon is of no consequence as they both are capable of killing people, and that was his ultimate goal he had in mind.



    I noticed in the Article you posted there was a statement that Cho was Court Ordered to a Mental Involuntary outpatient treatment, see Quote below.

    "Cho was found "mentally ill and in need of hospitalization" in December 2005, according to court papers. A judge ordered him into involuntary outpatient treatment, but there is no indication that Cho complied".

    Would you not agree that under this set of conditions that there would be a lack of follow up on the part of the Court that allowed this order to be ignored?

    As to the Police Department not divulging any information, that you or I, would be interested in seeing, or knowing, that is a normal process of investigating procedures, after the case is finally closed, it then will be up to the Dept. if they will release any, of the report to the public. Something Fishy??

    And to that end what real benefit will the information be to anyone other than a Profiler, or Detective, to possibly understand a future case of a like set of circumstances.

    The real issue here is to try to pre-empt, these situations in the future and if this type of personality is found to exist in a like setting, then make sure that the person is not allowed to skip the Sessions, and any such person should be monitored by a higher authority to insure that compliance is being upheld.


    It seems that in this case, the person was more or less out of the Teachers hair, and the matter was passed off to someone else to deal with, who did not take the proper interest in it, nor thought it worth following up on. The crack was opened and Cho fell through, tragic yes, but the blood has been spilled, and lives were lost, Students wereput in danger, and the perp, killed himself denying the people the opportunity of prosecuting himfor his crimes, end of story.

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