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Thread: An 11-year-old boy was attacked and killed by a black bear as he slept in a tent with his family

  1. #1
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    Boy killed by bear in American Fork Canyon

    Associated Press

    AMERICAN FORK — An 11-year-old boy was attacked and killed by a black bear as he slept in a tent with his family, police said.
    Wildlife officers searching for the animal believed they shot and injured a bear Monday morning.
    "Whether or not the bear was involved in the attack, we won't know that until we can kill the bear," said Mark Hadley, a spokesman for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.
    The boy's family was camping in American Fork Canyon, about 30 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, Sunday night, said Lt. Dennis Harris of the Utah County Sheriff's office.
    The boy, his mother, stepfather and a 6-year-old brother were sleeping in a large tent with several sections, he said.
    At about 11 p.m., the stepfather heard a scream, and the boy and his sleeping bag were gone. A host from a nearby campground contacted police.
    "When we got up there we realized, hey, this looks like a bear. The sleeping bag was pulled out of the tent," Harris said.
    He said the boy's body was found about 400 yards from the tent in the direction of another campsite where a bear sighting was reported earlier in the weekend.
    The Utah wildlife agency and the U.S. Forest Service were hunting for the bear with dogs.
    "In 28 years of law enforcement, this is the first bear attack that I know of in Utah County," Harris said.
    The canyon is a popular camping destination and also home to Timpanogos Cave National Monument. The attack occurred near the Timpanooke campground, which is about 12 miles up the canyon.
    Harris said the family was camping about two miles up a dirt road from that campground.





    We need to always be prepared.

    Here is the link

    http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,665194630,00.html



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    This is why I don't care what "the law" says about having a gun with you ANYwhere, let alone out camping -- even in National Parks --because this does happen and seems to be happening more often nowadays.

    In this case, however, it seems that a gun wouldn't have helped because the story didn't say the parents were able to reactquickly enough to shoot the bear before it made off with the boy.The BOY, if HE had agun in reach, would have been the only one tostop this particularattack.

    -- John D.


    (formerly of Colorado Springs, CO)

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    cloudcroft wrote:
    This is why I don't care what "the law" says about having a gun with you ANYwhere, let alone out camping -- even in National Parks --because this does happen and seems to be happening more often nowadays.

    In this case, however, it seems that a gun wouldn't have helped because the story didn't say the parents were able to reactquickly enough to shoot the bear before it made off with the boy.The BOY, if HE had agun in reach, would have been the only one tostop this particularattack.

    -- John D.

    I agree that it is not clear if they had time to shoot the bearor not, but if they were un-armed, as I assume they were, it wouldn't have mattered as you have little chance against a bear if you are unarmed.



    If they had been armed then they could have at least made the bear pay as he left.





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    tarzan1888 wrote:
    If they had been armed then they could have at least made the bear pay as he left.



    It's pretty clear from the article that the family never even saw the bear. How do you figure they could have made it pay?

    Just as importantly, how do you figure this is even remotely on-topic?
    "The very atmosphere of firearms anywhere and everywhere restrains evil interference - they deserve a place of honor with all that's good." - George Washington

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    roscoe13 wrote:
    tarzan1888 wrote:
    If they had been armed then they could have at least made the bear pay as he left.



    It's pretty clear from the article that the family never even saw the bear. How do you figure they could have made it pay?

    Just as importantly, how do you figure this is even remotely on-topic?

    I have heard or read many reports concerning the attack.

    The First report I heard was that they were all in the same tent, which is true, but it did not mention that there were several rooms in that tent.

    I must admit that I didn't carefully read the particular report that I posted, and I understand now that his parents did not see who or what took him as is mentioned in this report.

    One other note, apparently this same bear attacked another man yesterday and if he had been armed, he might have stopped today's events. Than again life is full of could have been's.

    http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=1363845

    Here is the story from KSL News as linked above.


    Boy Killed by Bear in American Fork Canyon
    June 18th, 2007 @ 12:30pm
    Courtney Orton and Sam Penrod Reporting
    An 11-year-boy was dragged from his tent and killed by a black bear in American Fork Canyon.
    This is the first fatality since the Department of Wildlife Resources has been keeping records in the state of Utah.
    The boy was camping with his family near the Timpooneke campground when the attack occurred.
    The bear is dead. It has been killed just before noon by DWR predator hunters who have been on the trail this bear all morning long, ever since the attack last night.
    The boy and his family were camping in an area near the Timpooneke campground. It was a primitive campground about two miles away from the developed campground. He was with his mother, stepfather and six-year-old brother. They were in a cabin tent; it's a tent that has multiple rooms. Around 11:00 p.m., the bear clawed through the tent and dragged the boy out in his sleeping bag.


    "The stepfather did hear the boy screaming. He immediately got up, ran out and tried to find out what was going on. The campground host, which is right down below us, went down to the mouth of the canyon to contact dispatch," explained Lt. Dennis Harris of the Utah County Sheriff's Office.
    For a time the stepfather wondered if the boy had been abducted by a person, but sadly, two hours later, the boy's body was found about 300 yards from the tent. The boy had been killed by a bear.
    This same bear is believed to have been in the same area early yesterday morning, and also tried to attack some camp campers. They called police and the DWR spent most of the day trying to catch the bear yesterday. Then the bear hunt started again today after this fatality and it has just ended.


    The father of the camper who was attacked yesterday survived, believes it was the same bear that caused this second attack. Kurt Francom said, "The coolers have bite marks in them, both of them, they got in the coolers he had, bit all the food in it, ate all the bread and the chips, which they didn't even know it was going on. But he woke up at 5:20 and something had hit him in the head in the tent. And he thought it was the people in the tent messing around next to him and he said, well, he said ‘knock it off.' You know and a couple minutes later he got hit so hard he thought somebody had kicked him."
    The 11-year-old boy has not been identified by authorities at this point.
    Jim Karpowitz, the director of Division of Wildfire Resources, said the bear will now be checked for diseases. He also said, "The sheriff's office will also want to look at evidence to make sure we have the right bear.

    Here is a link to the distruction of the bear.

    http://www.sltrib.com/ci_6170245



    Still a very sad day.




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    This is why I sleep with a pistol INSIDE the sleeping bag. Live or die, put up some kind of a fight.

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    An update on this sad story
    I have heard and read several up-dates on the story. the story below is typical.

    A couple of things to note.

    1. The same bear in the same area attacked another camper early Sunday morning.
    2. One of the campers had a 9mm and fired 1 or more warning shots and scared off the bear.
    3. The authorities were notified and a bear hunter spent 5 hours looking for the bear, but did not find it.
    4. Knowing that an aggressive bear was on the loose, nothing was done, and the camping area was not closed.

    My thoughts:

    1. Always carry
    2. Never fire a warning shot. Shoot to stop the threat.
    3. If the bear had been killed that would have been the end of it. If the bear was only wounded then a wounded bear would have been easier to find and destroy than a live healthy one. they were using dogs to hunt the bear.
    4. If the authorities had done their job and closed the area this may not have happened.
    5. Bears just aren't scared of men any more, as they are protected with only limited hunting. (I am not a hunter)

    http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,665194896,00.html



    Boy killed by bear

    The 11-year-old was pulled from his tent

    By Sara Israelsen
    Deseret Morning News
    AMERICAN FORK CANYON — A black bear that fatally mauled an 11-year-old boy in American Fork Canyon might not have been motivated by leftover camp food, officials said Monday.


    Steve Fidel, Deseret Morning News
    Collette Young shows the hole left in her tent during a bear attack early Saturday in American Fork Canyon. No one was injured. "It does not appear that the very minimal amount of food in the campsite had anything to do with the bear attack," Utah County Sheriff's Lt. Darren Gilbert said.
    The boy, Samuel Evan Ives of Pleasant Grove, was camping with his family in a wooded area just north of the Timpanooke campgrounds Sunday night when a bear slashed through his tent and pulled him out in his sleeping bag.
    "We're trying to make sense of this very tragic event," grandfather Eldon Ives said. "It's something that just doesn't make sense. It's like a bad dream. We're still struggling with how to grieve."
    "Some things you're prepared for, but we weren't prepared for news that our grandson and child was killed by a bear. That's one of the hardest things we're struggling with — the nonsensical nature of this tragedy."
    Ives said the family appreciates the outpouring of concern but asks for respect and privacy as they grieve. A trust fund has been set up for Samuel Ives' family through Wells Fargo Bank.
    This is the first black bear-related death recorded in Utah, officials said.
    The family heard the boy's screams but couldn't find him outside, so they reported an abduction. Officers from several agencies searched for two hours before they found the boy's body nearly 400 yards from the family's multiroom tent, Utah County Sheriff's Lt. Dennis Harris said.
    "It's just really sad," said Jim Karpowitz, director of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. "You don't expect that kind of thing when you are going camping with your family."
    A 250- to 350-pound adult black bear was killed about 11:40 a.m. Monday after extensive tracking by 26 dogs and five houndsmen.
    Officers shot the bear in the shoulder Sunday night, somewhere between Timpanooke and Ridge Line, but he ran off, and the dogs temporarily lost his scent. The bear wandered until he was finally tracked down and fatally shot.
    The animal's body was pulled off the mountain by a Utah Highway Patrol helicopter, then driven to Utah State University for testing, said Mike Fowlks, chief of law enforcement for the Division of Wildlife Resources.


    Steve Fidel, Deseret Morning News
    Jake Francom shows a pillow that was dragged away from his tent by a black bear early Saturday, a day before Sunday night's fatal mauling in the same primitive area. Dark marks on the pillow are the bear's paw prints. Wildlife officials said later Monday that DNA tests confirmed the bear was in fact responsible for the fatal mauling.
    "Normally, they're just a nuisance, not killers," Karpowitz said. "This is the first (death) we've ever dealt with."
    Officials also were investigating whether the bear was the same one that clawed into a tent of campers earlier. Those campers were questioning why the area wasn't shut down after they reported a bear scavenged in their campsite and ripped their tent.
    Jake Francom, 26, camped with his girlfriend, his brother and two other friends Friday night in the same primitive area just above Timpanooke. The site is not a specific Forest Service campground and has no services.
    He awoke when something outside the tent hit him in the head about 5:30 a.m. Saturday.
    Thinking it was someone moving in the tent, he said, "Stop it." But when he felt two more hard hits, he realized it was a bear.
    Jake told his girlfriend to get out, yelling at a friend in another tent to grab his gun.
    The bear ripped through the tent, taking a bite out of his pillow.
    The men shot at the bear a few times. It walked away from the camp, then stopped to stare at the campers before it lumbered off.
    The campers drove down the canyon and called their parents, who called police.
    After hearing about Sunday's fatality and having their sons' experience characterized as a "tent-brushing," the parents said they were frustrated and wondered why the area wasn't closed.
    "Why would they let another family up there?" mother Kathy Francom said. "All they had to do was shut a gate (to the campground) and that boy wouldn't be gone."
    "It broke me down," father Kurt Francom said of watching the news of the mauling early Monday. "It could have been my boy."
    Uinta National Forest officials defended their decision to keep the forest open, saying the information they received about the bear didn't include many details, and they were told the proper agencies had been notified.


    KSL-TV
    Wildlife officials drag the body of a black bear Monday. DNA tests showed the bear killed a boy Sunday. Plus, the area the family chose wasn't actually a campground but merely a flat spot of land.
    "We are indeed sorry," said John Logan, acting district ranger for the Uinta National Forest. "Our hearts are going out to the family."
    When they learned of the bear-related fatality about 2 a.m., they sent rangers to sweep campgrounds in the area. The area was sparsely populated with campers, but the rangers told them about the mauling and asked them to leave, said Loyal Clark, Uinta National Forest spokeswoman.
    The division also posts signs at campgrounds and trailheads to notify campers and hikers about bears in the area and necessary precautions.
    "We're doing everything we can to make people bear-aware," Karpowitz said. "It's hard to plan for an event that's never ever happened in the state of Utah."
    Division of Wildlife Resources immediately classified the bear as a Level Three animal and sent out officers with a shoot-to-kill prerogative, Karpowitz said.
    A Level Three bear is one that has displayed aggressive behavior toward humans, has little fear of humans or has attempted to kill domestic pets, according to information from the division.
    Level Two animals need to be relocated, and Level One animals prompt officials to post signs about potential sightings.
    From 1990 to 2007, there were 49 fatal attacks involving bears in North America, with 29 of those attacks occurring since 1990.
    Being knowledgeable about the area and the potential dangers is the best way to avoid problems, Clark said.
    "It's as safe as it's going to get out there," Clark said. "If there are hazards, we're going to try to mitigate those, evaluate those and take appropriate action."
    For more information about camping safety visit: wildlife.utah.gov/ or www.fs.fed.us/r4/uinta/.



    Deseret Morning News graphic

    Deseret Morning News graphic

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    They should have at least had a sign or something notifying other people that a bear which had broken the camp on Friday was still in the area, but then again that's 20/20 hindsight on my part.
    -Unrequited

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    My 18 year old son is going to be working as a ranger for the Forest Service in the back country in Southwest Virginia this summer. I considered loaning him a pistol -- or alternatively firecrackers --as bear repellant.

    Unfortunately, although VA is an open carry state, my reading of the regulations suggest that open carry is only permitted during hunting season in the fall/winter. No joy there.

    Concealed carry is permitted but only with a permit: and the minimum age for a permitin VAis 21.

    And firecrackers are prohibited in a national forest.

    What alternatives for the common black bear? Airhorn? Mace?

    its number 100!

    Donkey

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    OC spray... apparently it works so well, some animal activist groups want to force makers to have a special lower-potency version so it doesn't hurt the animals...

    and I can't find a reference for that last statement even though I KNOW I've read it somewhere... or I'm making it up in my head. But regardless, OC Spray should work wonders... against animals that is.
    -Unrequited

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    Yes.

    Thank you.

    Sounds like a potent mix could do the trick.

    Will counsel him: 1) to find a canister with a safety mechanism(so it doesn't squirt in his day-pack) and 2) not to use it on burritos.

    Dnky

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    The Donkey wrote:
    2) not to use it on burritos.

    Dnky
    Haha. Dare ya!

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    Yesterday, I sent this email to the top guy at the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation:


    Hello,

    Please help me to understand the meaning of the following Idaho Administrative Code:

    600.PERSONAL SAFETY, FIREARMS.
    No person may discharge firearms or any other projectile firing device, or otherwise purposefully or negligently endanger the life of any person or creature within any land administered by the Department. All firearms brought onto lands administered by the Department shall be unloaded at all times and either out of sight, or in a vehicle, except when used for legal hunting as authorized in Section 575 in this chapter, or for exhibition or at designated ranges as authorized by the Director.

    What and where exactly are the lands administered by the Department? Are they only state parks? If my family is camping, am I allowed to carry a handgun to protect us from predators?

    Thank you for response.
    It looks like you can carry a concealed gun as long as it is unloadedand you don't endanger the life of the bear that is carrying away your child.

    I'll let you know what they say.

    LoveMyCountry


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    The Donkey wrote:
    Yes.

    Thank you.

    Sounds like a potent mix could do the trick.

    Will counsel him: 1) to find a canister with a safety mechanism (so it doesn't squirt in his day-pack) and 2) not to use it on burritos.

    Dnky
    A lot more info in this thread where I think I got the too-potent mentality from, and a lot of good suggestions:

    http://opencarry.mywowbb.com/view_to...t=pepper+spray
    -Unrequited

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