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Thread: "Yes Sir, No Sir, Have a good day Sir.....

  1. #1
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    Well here's a question to you all....

    Since I have been OC'ing about 95% of the time now... I was wondering, have any of you noticed that the people who do speak to you have gotten a bit more polite... <G>.... I seem to notice alot more "Yes Sir" " No Sir" lately.

    Even some of the younger more disrespectful kids I have run across are not giving me any disrespect..... It was just a funny thought that came to me after 4 youngkids approached me in the Wal-Mart parking lot the other day. That grunge look, acting all cocky. Yes I know it's sterotyping, but I went to yellow right away..

    When one of them said "Hey man whatcha got in the bag man...?" I just said.. "Just bought about 400 rounds of ammo for my Beretta." and then I turned and they saw it on my hip...

    "Oh cool SIR..." YOU HAVE A NICE DAY.. and they walked the other way.

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    I have noticed the same, sometimes I even get the pen handed to me now when I have to sign for the receipt, instead of reaching into the cup, also everyone is more polite all around, may be that they are nervous though and aren't sure how to respond to a plain clothes citizen with a firearm...


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    An armed society is a polite society. -- Robert Heinlein

    > )

    I think a third of it are people who think I'm a LEO because I dress nice when I OC, a third are scared of me and just acting nice, and a third are just nice people who would have been just as polite regardless. ...then there are the MMM's heh.
    -Unrequited

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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    Sorry double post
    "Research has shown that a 230 grain lead pellet placed just behind the ear at 850 FPS results in a permanent cure for violent criminal behavior."
    "If you are not getting Flak, you are not over the target"
    "186,000 Miles per second! ... Not just a good idea ... It's the law!"

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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    In most cases people give what they get. I was raised to use "Sir" and "Mamm" when I talk to people, especially strangers. Most people reciprocate. I have only had one more or less recent encounter with a young person who did not.

    I was unarmed at the time and found this person on my property. When I asked if I could help him, he became indignant, and told me to F off. I told him to leave, and he said, "I will leave when I am good and damn ready to."

    I walked over to him, got very close, looked him in the eye, and quietly said, "Young man your Mother brought you into this world, but I can take you out of it. Would you like to reconsider leaving now." He did not say anything else but he did leave.

    But most of the time if I offer respect, people reciprocate, weather I am armed or not.

    Regards
    "Research has shown that a 230 grain lead pellet placed just behind the ear at 850 FPS results in a permanent cure for violent criminal behavior."
    "If you are not getting Flak, you are not over the target"
    "186,000 Miles per second! ... Not just a good idea ... It's the law!"

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    They call you sir because they probably think you're a cop.

    Which bothers me a bit. I don't like to be mistaken for a cop, but what can you do I guess?

    It also bothers me that you have to be a cop to get the kind of respect I was taught to give all adults. One of the things that really gets under my skin is how people who don't know you and have never met you start off calling you by your first name. Car salesman like to do this. I was shopping for a new truck and this guy starts calling me [Tomahawk] like we're drinking buddies. I had spoken to this man once on the telephone and I'm geting ready to do business with him to the tune of $20k-$30k and he doesn't know how to show the proper respect. Same thing when you go to apply for a loan at your bank. Those are the times when I expect to be called "sir" and "Mr." followed by last name.

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    I never call cops "Sir." Crminals usually do, because that'show theyHAD toaddress "the man" on the chain gang.

    We have lots of ignorant/arrogant/racist cops around here...I don't respect them so I sure won't call them "Sir." And I'm not prone to kissing-up to anyone, either, nor are they my superiors deserving of the word "Sir."

    I'm polite, butI nevercall them "Sir."

    Of course, the cops use "Sir" all the time with us citizens...I guess it's because they have to be polite when theirvideo cameras are on so they don't catch crap later from Internal Affairs.

    -- John D.






    (formerly of Colorado Springs, CO)

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    Yeah I never use sir when talkin to cops I just talk like I normally would. The cops haven't earned my respect so I just act nice.

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    I call everyone "Mr. ___" or "Mrs. ___" by default, and if any cop takes issue with that, then you are dealing with a real jerk. It is never disrespectful to call a man "Mr. ___" and I don't care for titles.

    I once - quite by accident - stepped on an Army captain's shoes at a local restaurant and said "excuse me there sarge" in a minor effort at levity. He got VERY indignant, pointed to his insignia,and gave me lots of loud grief about how he was an officer in the US military and should be accorded the respect due his station, etc. I pointed to my clothes, sans insignia, and said "I'm a civilian, and I can call you whatever I like - sarge." He winced in visbile pain when I said it again, but that's too bad. I would have been sincerely contrite if he had just been civil instead of trying to publicly upbraid me. The actual sergeant with him almost died trying not to laugh, by the way.

    That said, my father was a sergeant in the Army (in WWII), he hated officers and their pretensions, and I felt I owed it to the old man to wind the guy up.

    -ljp

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    State Researcher dng's Avatar
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    I try to use "sir" and "mame" with everyone I talk to. I will do my best to show respect to everyone until they give me a reason not to.If I want to be respected, then I should show respect to others (i.e. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you) Ialways refer to aLEO as "sir" or "mame", and I do not feel as though it makes them better than me. I think it's just being polite, and it is not only criminals who are about to get arrested that use those words. What's the saying; "a teaspoon of sugar gets you alot further than a cup of salt". Even a LEOis corrupt, I believe it is still important to respect the office and the badge. For example; President Bush has made me mad quite a bit, but he is still our nation's leader.

    Just my 2 cents, not calling anyone out, but I wanted to mention another way to look at things.


    Edit: fixing the typing errors....

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    Legba,

    It's intestesting tonote that once they get out of the service -- retire -- their rank, even if a general/admiral, means nothing anymore. Lots of them end up doing civilian work WAY below their station of life when they were in the military. I'm sure it's quite a let-down...and not giving orders anymore but taking them, especially from people lots younger, be they competent or not.

    Not knocking those people, that's just the usual but sad reality of it.

    So they should enjoy the military while they can because whenthey get out, they're just "regular folks"once again.



    dngreer

    I don't disrepect them -- I am verycooperative and cordial -- I just don't address them as "Sir."


    -- John D.




    (formerly of Colorado Springs, CO)

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    State Researcher dng's Avatar
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    cloudcroft wrote:

    dngreer

    I don't disrepect them -- I am verycooperative and cordial -- I just don't address them as "Sir."

    -- John D.


    My thoughts were more for gun guy. I understand where you are coming from.

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    Okay...but at least Gun Guy "acts nice" and that's good!

    -- John D.


    (formerly of Colorado Springs, CO)

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    Founder's Club Member Tess's Avatar
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    cloudcroft wrote:
    Legba,

    It's intestesting tonote that once they get out of the service -- retire -- their rank, even if a general/admiral, means nothing anymore. Lots of them end up doing civilian work WAY below their station of life when they were in the military. I'm sure it's quite a let-down...and not giving orders anymore but taking them, especially from people lots younger, be they competent or not.

    Not knocking those people, that's just the usual but sad reality of it.

    So they should enjoy the military while they can because whenthey get out, they're just "regular folks"once again.
    I want to meet the ones you know <grin>. THe ones I know still wear their rank on their sleeves after they retiren (at least the Colonels and Generals).

    I lost a job opportunity one time when they said "General xxx will call you" and I told the secretary "I don't want to work for General xxx, I want to work for Mr. xxx." She told me in no uncertain terms that's not how they work at that firm. I took my resume back home with me. The job description was tailor made for my skills.

    Of course, more times than not, I've been accused of being a retired LTC.
    Laws alone can not secure freedom of expression; in order that every man present his views without penalty there must be spirit of tolerance in the entire population. -Albert Einstein

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    Maybe it's just how it isout here on the Frontier.

    Back in civilization like VA -- and as you know I used to live in Fairfax myself -- it's probably more like you say. And amongst the boating -- or should I say yachting circlesfrequentingposh VA marinas -- old military rank may be more of an issue. But I've been away from America so long that I may just be out of touch with that.

    But then again, any boat owner/pilot is at least a "captain."

    -- John D.


    (formerly of Colorado Springs, CO)

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    I address folks as I see appropriate... in terms of law enforcement, during discharge of their duties, I'll address them by their rank unless they're especially friendly or especially asinine...

    That pretty much goes for anybody... It doesn't cost me anything to be at least respectful until I have a reason not to be.

    And, "sir" can be used in a respectful or condescending way... Manner is more than just words.

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    I was also raised to say 'sir' and 'maam' and still do to this day. But on the flipside, when my dad was in the Marines, there were a lot of the Staff NCO's that it seemed would get genuinely upset at being called sir. They'd give the 'Don't call me sir I work fora living' speech.

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    I sir and ma'amconstantly. My boss has told me repeatedly that he is not a "sir." I just can't avoid calling him sir, though. I have noticed, though, that sir and ma'am are heard far less than they once were. Cops sir and ma'am more often than a lot of folks, but I don't think they necessarilyget addressed that way more often. From what I've seen, they are "officer."

    As for the gun on my hip getting me treated better, I think I'd like to go where you guys go. I get treated exactly the same, and I'm fairly certain it's because they don't notice the bitone XD45 Service on my belt. While I don't want to be treated better for it, I would really like to believe people are more attentive than that. The stainless slide and full-length grip shouldn't be too difficult to spot.

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    Drewesque wrote:
    I sir and ma'amconstantly. My boss has told me repeatedly that he is not a "sir." I just can't avoid calling him sir, though. I have noticed, though, that sir and ma'am are heard far less than they once were. Cops sir and ma'am more often than a lot of folks, but I don't think they necessarilyget addressed that way more often. From what I've seen, they are "officer."

    As for the gun on my hip getting me treated better, I think I'd like to go where you guys go. I get treated exactly the same, and I'm fairly certain it's because they don't notice the bitone XD45 Service on my belt. While I don't want to be treated better for it, I would really like to believe people are more attentive than that. The stainless slide and full-length grip shouldn't be too difficult to spot.
    I believe that some of the people that wait on us or serve us, wether it be a bank teller, waitress, gas station attendant, notice the firearm more than we think.

    Some of these people have to be anti's, thats just the law of averages. Some may be neutral, or even pro 2a fanatics.

    But I believe that a lot of people are uncomfortable addressing a civilian with a firearm as they have been sensitized to them. It may be a nervous silence, or they may just want to get you out as fast as they can.


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    Ryan, I'm sure it's noticed by some a lot more than I think...but there are some that I am certain didn't notice. convenience store clerks seem the most oblivious to it, partially because they try only to notice customers if they are at the counter (at best). By that time, the gun is behind the counter, so they never notice it. Situational awareness is not very high in that particular field of work, I guess.

    On the other hand, I don't go out to eat very often, and I tend not to open carry into banks (I go before or after work, and I am not allowed to carry at work, so I can't go in with a gun on my hip). I'm certain there'd be more folks who would notice in those places. Hell, gun or not, I can see employees give me at least a good once-over whenever I walk into the bank. If I OCed there, I'm sure they'd notice.

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    "Sir? GD-it boy, do I look like a SIR to you? I WORK for a living!"

    Say it really, REALLY loud. Make R. Lee Ermey proud.

    That being said, I always feel a bit... odd when someone a few years younger than I am calls me sir. I'm not THAT old yet, am I?
    Why open carry? Because 1911 > 911.

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    It's just a phase you're going through...you'll get over that "odd" feeling soon.

    Oncebeing called "Sir"no longer bothers you, you'll know you really ARE an old guy.

    -- John D.


    (formerly of Colorado Springs, CO)

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    Being 20 years old,I have no problem saying I'm a young guy. I work in customer service and call every by Ms ____ or Mr ____ (I have to know my customers names.) I get people that make the annoying joke "mr ___ is my dad,hu huh" or "I'm not that old." But that gets on my nerves. Your gonna be an ******* to me,just because I am being polite?

    People are so incredibly rude anyway. I've gotten used to it,unfortunately sometimes I do it myself. Why? If its a matter of being polite or putting myself in potential harm/danger(or just think I do.)

    In my expereince with customers over the last 3 1/2 years. People have only gotten cheaper, dumber,and ruder.

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    I try to set a baseline of civility, to project my expectation of respect in whatever interaction I am having. My saying, "sir," throws out a challenge to the other person to behave themselves or let the whole world know that yes, they are an ass. Said well, with the correct body language, etc., it asserts your standing as well. Psychology is funny stuff.

    C.

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    LtherNeck....

    I'll relate a little story. Was out late one night eating with some fellow biz owners about 1 am in a very popular greasy spoon joint in Covington, Ky. 2 large tables of rather noisy yunger folk, (ok college to high school most a little tipsy) seems they were being loud talkers, cussing, bragging about anything and dissing cops, etc. humm OK well this outta be intresting, the inevitable trip to go pee. now usually when I am out I try to cc but my doggone FD station t shirt was just shruken alittle. (ok so I put on a pound while eating) so I go out and come back from the restroom. Wow it got quiet and boy did I feel likethere was some eyes bugging out. amazing how polite these kids all got at both tables, and much more behaved. Now of course having a fresh high and tight flat top haircut might also have something to say how I looked that night.



    But Yea I'd say seems folks are more nicer.
    Favorite recent Quote:
    "As long as I'm prosecutor, if someone comes into a store with a gun and I've said it before and I'll say it again they have forfeited their right not to be shot,"
    Hamilton County, Ohio - prosecutor; Joe Deters

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