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Thread: Carry at work

  1. #1
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    I would like to OC at work. Any ideas how to convince the boss it's a good idea? Has anyone had success getting permission to OC (or even CC) at work? My work is small. Less than 50 employees so I figure I have a better chance than at some huge corporation. I understand my work is worried about getting sued if someone who had their permission to carry shot the place up. Why does the work place have to be an unarmed victims zone? I work in an office btw and I OC everywhere else.

    Here are the rules at my work concerning firearms:
    501
    These safety rules are based on recognized safety procedures and OSHA regulations.
    A. CONDUCT Horseplay, fighting, possession of firearms, alcohol or any unauthorized drugs may result in termination of employment.
    522
    All employees, including supervisors and temporary employees, should be treated with courtesy and respect at all times. Employees are expected to refrain from fighting, "horseplay," or other conduct that may be dangerous to others. Firearms, weapons, and other dangerous or hazardous devices or substances are prohibited from the premises of xxxxxxx without proper authorization.
    701
    It is not possible to list all the forms of behavior that are considered unacceptable in the workplace. The following are examples of infractions of rules of conduct that may result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment:
    * Possession of dangerous or unauthorized materials, such as explosives or firearms, in the workplace

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    Regular Member compmanio365's Avatar
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    I hear you, I have been contemplating just asking our HR department here at work about being allowed to carry to work, even if I don't carry it on my person while working, if it was locked up in my desk until I went home at the end of the day, that way I could easily access it if something were to happen at our office. My coworkers in my department all know about my gun ownership and are comfortable with it; I have explained a lot to them about OC and all that, and they know I have my CCW. But our rule still remains of "no weapons". I am more worried about walking through downtown Seattle early in the morning, especially now that it is getting darker again. I have had close calls a couple of times with the homeless/crazy people around here trying to start fights with me before, and I don't doubt that some of these people are nuts enough to try to attack you for money/food/whatever.

    If anyone has tips for me and nathan, I think it is a good idea to try to "break the ice" on the subject with one's HR department; let's think of a way to do it without losing one's job though.......

  3. #3
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    I'd be happy if i could just have my pistol in my car in the parking lot... i'd like to have it here beside me, but i'd settle for the parking lot.

    but, you just can't trust engineers

  4. #4
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    Don't ask, Don't tell.

  5. #5
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    I'm really curious how ANY business gets away with a "no weapons" policy. EVERYTHING can be used as a weapon. I mentioned in my HOA thread that our community park has a "no firearms or dangerous weapons" rule. Well, I looked up the definition for a deadly weapon under Washington State Law and it truly covers any object you can imagine.

    RCW 9.94A.602

    "For purposes of this section, a deadly weapon is an implement or instrument which has the capacity to inflict death and from the manner in which it is used, is likely to produce or may easily and readily produce death. The following instruments are included in the term deadly weapon: Blackjack, sling shot, billy, sand club, sandbag, metal knuckles, any dirk, dagger, pistol, revolver, or any other firearm, any knife having a blade longer than three inches, any razor with an unguarded blade, any metal pipe or bar used or intended to be used as a club, any explosive, and any weapon containing poisonous or injurious gas."

    According to this definition, virtually every object known to man is a deadly weapon. I've never seen any evidence to show that a permit holder with a gun is more of a risk than a secretary with a letter opener (though, I have seen plenty of evidence to show the opposite).

    In my opinion, employers need to reconsider their policies or, at the very least, reword their policies to make "unlawful" weapons off-limits. Nobody that has an intention of hurting their coworkers is going to give a damn about some silly rule, but at least rewording it will let the antis sleep better at night. Unfortunately, virtually all companies - especially large ones - see having a "no weapons" policy as a protection against liability. Until somebody is injured and successfully sues their company for being disarmed, things will stay as they are.

  6. #6
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    Reverend73 wrote:
    Don't ask, Don't tell.
    That might work in "no weapons" areas where you're not employed, but it's very risky at your place of business (assuming you want to keep your job). If I carry in a business that has a no weapons sign, at most I risk being asked to leave. If I carry at my job and someone sees my weapon print, I'll be looking for a new line of work. Also, an employer could ask to search my vehicle or person at any time. I'd be within my rights to refuse, but they would be within their rights to fire me if I did.

    And I can just imagine the phone call that would go down when prospective employers called for references...

    "Would Cue-Ball be eligible for rehire at your company"?
    "No".
    "Could you explain why not"?
    "He carried a loaded gun into the building, against company policy".

    The fact that you're acting in your own best interests (and likely, the best interests of your fellow employees) wouldn't matter. The prospective employer would likely see you as a dangerous, unstable person who is looking to cause trouble. Unless, of course, you're applying for a job at the local gun shop.

  7. #7
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    Cue-Ball wrote:
    Reverend73 wrote:
    Don't ask, Don't tell.
    That might work in "no weapons" areas where you're not employed, but it's very risky at your place of business (assuming you want to keep your job). If I carry in a business that has a no weapons sign, at most I risk being asked to leave. If I carry at my job and someone sees my weapon print, I'll be looking for a new line of work. Also, an employer could ask to search my vehicle or person at any time. I'd be within my rights to refuse, but they would be within their rights to fire me if I did.

    And I can just imagine the phone call that would go down when prospective employers called for references...

    "Would Cue-Ball be eligible for rehire at your company"?
    "No".
    "Could you explain why not"?
    "He carried a loaded gun into the building, against company policy".

    The fact that you're acting in your own best interests (and likely, the best interests of your fellow employees) wouldn't matter. The prospective employer would likely see you as a dangerous, unstable person who is looking to cause trouble. Unless, of course, you're applying for a job at the local gun shop.

    I guess the choice is yours.

    You chose, I did.

    Remember the Dirty Harry line. "I guess the question you have to ask yourself punk, is do I feel lucky. Well do ya Punk?"


    I feel lucky and so far I have been.

  8. #8
    Regular Member eBratt's Avatar
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    Thankfully my current employment is a very small company (less than 10 people) on Bainbridge Island and doesn't have an employee handbook, HR department, or anything of the like. I just quietly CCW and don't ask. As much as I would like to OC, I don't dare ask as I still haven't gotten a feel for how my boss is about firearms.
    "The very atmosphere of firearms anywhere and everywhere restrains evil interference - they deserve a place of honor with all that's good" - George Washington
    "Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act of depriving a whole nation of arms, as the blackest." - Mahatma Gandhi

    As always, insert standard IANAL disclaimer here.

  9. #9
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    Reverend73 wrote:
    Don't ask, Don't tell.
    Yup. I've been working for this company since I was 19, I'm now almost 22. From the day I turned 21 I've carried. I'm not really sure what the gun policy is here, don't really care. To me, my safety/life is more important than my job. The own is pretty pro gun,I don't think he'd have a problem with it, but i've never asked.

  10. #10
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    I think open carry at work is just asking for trouble. Unless it is a gun related business, or you own the business, or your boss open carries I just don't see it as working out. You still have to understand most people are not used to seeing a gun. And since you're dealing with an HR department I'm sure this is a office type business. I could just see people freaking out or not being ok with it. Quite personally, I deal with a lot of clients at my job. Now when I'm out or about in public I could care less if someone is offended by my right to open carry, but when it comes to the people I rely on to substain my quality of living and that of my family, do I really want to freak them out or offend them? Not really. Sure that may seem like a copout, but I can't think about just me, I have other people that rely on me. I CC at work. I wear a suit 99% of the time anyway, so I'd have to go out of my way to OC which would make it look like I do it for a statement, and that's not why I OC.

  11. #11
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    Here is a thread about this a few months ago, not sure there is a lot to help you out, but you'll see some opinions if nothing else.

  12. #12
    Regular Member John Hardin's Avatar
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    uncoolperson wrote:
    I'd be happy if i could just have my pistol in my car in the parking lot... i'd like to have it here beside me, but i'd settle for the parking lot.
    Take a look at this thread: http://opencarry.mywowbb.com/forum55/3849.html

    That is one of the things I'm proposing.

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