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Thread: Disarm the African Americans

  1. #1
    Regular Member Mainsail's Avatar
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    This was published by GeorgiaCarry.org

    Having been stationed at Charleston AFB in SC, I was somewhat of an oddity in 1987 because I owned a Glock 17. At that time, the Glock pistols were considered ‘Saturday Night Specials’ due primarily to the temperature at which the frame melted. Thus, no dealer could sell them and no gunsmith would work on them. I found it preposterous that my full sized Glock could be considered a SNS, but that was the law.

    I asked several knowledgeable people and was told the law was written, originally, to keep poor blacks from owning guns, as the guns that we would normally recognize as a SNS were cheaply made from pot-metal and inexpensive. At the time I could easily have gotten twice the $400 I paid for the Glock 17 new, as private sales were not banned. The law was changed when the State Patrol wanted to start carrying Glocks themselves.



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    great read i read a similar article while doing research for a paper in college

    http://www.firearmsandliberty.com/cramer.racism.html

    "In the seventeenth century, the aristocratic power structure of colonial Virginia found itself confronting a similar challenge from lower class whites. These poor whites resented how the men who controlled the government used that power to concentrate wealth into a small number of hands. These wealthy feeders at the government trough would have disarmed poor whites if they could, but the threat of both Indian and pirate attack made this impractical; for all white men "were armed and had to be armed..." Instead, blacks, who had occupied a poorly defined status between indentured servant and slave, were reduced to hereditary chattel slavery, so that poor whites could be economically advantaged, without the upper class having to give up its privileges. [37]
    Today, the forces that push for gun control seem to be heavily (though not exclusively) allied with political factions that are committed to dramatic increases in taxation on the middle class. While it would be hyperbole to compare higher taxes on the middle class to the suffering and deprivation of sharecropping or slavery, the analogy of disarming those whom you wish to economically disadvantage, has a certain worrisome validity to it.
    Another point to consider is that in the American legal system, certain classifications of governmental discrimination are considered constitutionally suspect, and these "suspect classifications" (usually considered to be race and religion) come to a court hearing under a strong presumption of invalidity. The reason for these "suspect classifications" is because of the long history of governmental discrimination based on these classifications, and because these classifications often impinge on fundamental rights. [38]
    In much the same way, gun control has historically been a tool of racism, and associated with racist attitudes about black violence. Similarly, many gun control laws impinge on that most fundamental of rights: self-defense. Racism is so intimately tied to the history of gun control in America that we should regard gun control aimed at law-abiding people as a "suspect idea," and require that the courts use the same demanding standards when reviewing the constitutionality of a gun control law, that they would use with respect to a law that discriminated based on race."


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    First and foremost, I'd like to applaud GCO for raising awareness to Georgia's racist gun laws past and present. Only through education and awareness can these ellusive and hate/fear filled laws be changed. Over the past few years I have educated myself in the events of Camilla GA, Rosewood Fl, Stono SC, and countless other incidents in American history where racism and gunlaws go hand in hand. I am proud of all the advancements that my people have made in terms of gun ownership and as a result I have opted to obtain a firearms license in my home state of Georgia as well as Virginia, Connecticut, Nevada, Utah,as well as an exposed firearms license in the state of California so that the innocent bloodshed and senseless murders and breaches of civil rights wont be in vain. Furthermore, I urgeALL law abiding citizens to excercise their 2nd ammendment rights as well as educating those that arent well versed in handgun laws so that all the work done by organizations such as GCO and the NRA arent such an uphill battle and certain objectives and goals can be achieved with less resistance.

    Kudos for posting this thread..

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    Mainsail wrote:
    This was published by GeorgiaCarry.org

    Having been stationed at Charleston AFB in SC, I was somewhat of an oddity in 1987 because I owned a Glock 17. At that time, the Glock pistols were considered ‘Saturday Night Specials’ due primarily to the temperature at which the frame melted. Thus, no dealer could sell them and no gunsmith would work on them. I found it preposterous that my full sized Glock could be considered a SNS, but that was the law.

    I asked several knowledgeable people and was told the law was written, originally, to keep poor blacks from owning guns, as the guns that we would normally recognize as a SNS were cheaply made from pot-metal and inexpensive. At the time I could easily have gotten twice the $400 I paid for the Glock 17 new, as private sales were not banned. The law was changed when the State Patrol wanted to start carrying Glocks themselves.

    The SNS definition was not a racist decision as people try to point out but rather an attempt to comply with a nationwide movement for gun restrictions. I remember listening to a lot of the discussions on how to come up with a definition. At that time the .25 caliber auto was the gun of choice for a concealed weapon to slip into your pocket when going out on a Saturday night. There were no racist intents but rather a movement to reduce the number of shootings at the local clubs where alcohol led to lots of fights and shootings. I remember those days well. The ironic result was that where very few fatalities occured with the .25 auto people switched to much more lethal weapons to carry and resulted in more deaths.

    The SNS were very poorly made and often resulted in the shooter being hurt more often than the shootee. A friend of mine was carrying one while driving the tractor with it in his hip pocket and hit a bump. The gun started firing and fired every round in the magazine while still in his pocket. He quit carrying that one. We had several mae working on our farm and probably half of them had been shot by a SNS when the law was passed.

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    GeorgiaCarry.org has filed an Amicus breif in D.C. v. Heller that lays out the racist laws that have been carried forward to today. http://www.georgiacarry.com/Heller/0...orgiaCarry.pdf

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