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Thread: Why I don't watch Court TV or Cop shows....

  1. #1
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    Okay, I was just channel surfing this morning when I came across a case on Court TV in which a young woman was charged with the negligent homicide of her sister. This isn't that important

    What is important is that during the ensuing investigation, the investigating officer arrived on scene and found a loaded, Condition 1 1911 lying on a couch. He was so naive as to the operation of this gun that he removed the magazine and tried to rack the slide to clear the gun. The slide would not move. It was jammed he assumed. I'm sure most of you know where this is going by now. The weapon was in condition 1, meaning the safety was engaged. YOU CANNOT MOVE THE SLIDE ON A 1911 WHEN THE SAFETY IS ENGAGED. The officer claimed he had never encountered such a weapon that disengaged the motion of the entire slide, that it must be a rare design!

    This man carries a gun everday in order to "serve and protect" innocent lives. I sure hope he knows his way around his Glock (I assume) a little better.

    I will now step off the soapbox.

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    The thing is, a lot of cops I know aren't gun enthusiasts -- they only time their guns break leather is to qualify once or twice a year. Some might find it fun to go to the range every now and then, but the only weapon they have is their issued service pistol.



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    The more important question in my mind is why the cop felt the need to pick up and handle the gun. Was there a threat? Or does he just feel the need to unload any gun that isn't his?



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    imperialism2024 wrote:
    The more important question in my mind is why the cop felt the need to pick up and handle the gun. Was there a threat? Or does he just feel the need to unload any gun that isn't his?

    If he was investigating a crime scene and collecting evidence, part of that would be to secure a potential weapon used during the commission of the crime.

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    Yup not that uncommon, I had to teach my FTO how to "work" an AR. We were called to a Repossession business after the recovery agent found an AR in a vehicle they had just picked up. My FTO picked it up and looked it over turned to me and said "you know how to do these" I grabbed it and cleared it(loaded and ready) all in about 4sec. after we took it to the station for "holding"(until the owner could come get it) I went over the AR platform with him, and enough times that I was comfortable letting him hold it(with ammo in a bag and the clip in another).

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    With FCPD you have to qualify with your gun once per year that you will possess while off duty, that are not issued or approved by the agency along with your regular issued handgun. Current usage of handgun is p226 9mm (basic) 229 (advanced) These officers dont know much about insights of every gun just their service pistol (tested on).

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    Accomplished Advocate color of law's Avatar
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    When one of my friends wants to hand me one of their new toys and I never handled that particular toy, I won't take it until I know it's unloaded and he shows me how it operates first. I don't like surprises.

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    color of law wrote:
    When one of my friends wants to hand me one of their new toys and I never handled that particular toy, I won't take it until I know it's unloaded and he shows me how it operates first. I don't like surprises.
    I like surprises but those type suck

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    It just seems that a more detailed education of firearms would be extremely helpful, even necessary IMO, for an LEO. It could be invaluable information in a shootout, not to mention the obvious safety issues that were presented by the officer's ignorance in the OP.

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    When I was last accosted by the police, they felt the need to strip me of my empty holster, which was a belt-threaded OWB type. I was wearing an army-type canvas belt, and not one of the cops could work the belt buckle to remove the belt and holster. They had to uncuff me to get me to take the belt and holster off. So, I for one am not surprised that someone didn't know how to work a 1911 safety.

    -ljp

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    When one of my friends wants to hand me one of their new toys and I never handled that particular toy, I won't take it until I know it's unloaded and he shows me how it operates first. I don't like surprises.
    When I speak on gun safety I differentiate between a gun laid left and right side down. With the safety and slide lock down, it is an invitation to not handle it witlessly.

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    I find it troubling that more departments don't train their officers on how to operate and/or clear different types of guns.

    I, for one, don't like AK's, for example. Idon't have any interest in one, have no desire to own one. BUT, I took the opportunity to learn how to operate one, just for my own eddification. Basically, it's like any other semi-auto.

    The point is, if ever I need to clear one, I can do it safely. You'd be amazed how many "experts" I can hand a single action pistol to that I have to sit down and show them how everything works. One guy couldn't get used to the idea of cocking the hammer. He thought it had a HELL of a trigger pull, then asked how to turn the safety off!

    I'm also kinda troubled by the officers who are so troubled by guns, as if they had never seen one fired.

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    Wynder wrote:
    imperialism2024 wrote:
    The more important question in my mind is why the cop felt the need to pick up and handle the gun. Was there a threat? Or does he just feel the need to unload any gun that isn't his?

    If he was investigating a crime scene and collecting evidence, part of that would be to secure a potential weapon used during the commission of the crime.
    That's true, he should have cleared and secured the weapon but the officer didn't clear the 1911 and left it loaded. Very bad mistake and it is an example of how some LEOs feel they have to know it all and won't ask when they don't. I was stopped on the way home from the range on day buy the new girl on the block. She couldn't figure out how to clear the Makarov, the 3 1911s or the H&K 45 Compact. WhenSgt. Wes Stockwell arrived to assist, he just put all mypistols back in my truck and sent me on my way. Sometimes living in a small community works for you.

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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Why are we discussing a TV show produced/edited for entertainment purposes as if it is real?

    Do you really expect producers and directors to "get it right" re: crime scene investigation, handling of evidence etc., etc.

    Or maybe you really believe the BS that they are pushing as reality tv.

    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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    Grapeshot wrote:
    Why are we discussing a TV show produced/edited for entertainment purposes as if it is real?

    Do you really expect producers and directors to "get it right" re: crime scene investigation, handling of evidence etc., etc.

    Or maybe you really believe the BS that they are pushing as reality tv.

    Yata hey
    'cause we enjoy it.

  16. #16
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    spurrit wrote:
    Grapeshot wrote:
    Why are we discussing a TV show produced/edited for entertainment purposes as if it is real?

    Do you really expect producers and directors to "get it right" re: crime scene investigation, handling of evidence etc., etc.

    Or maybe you really believe the BS that they are pushing as reality tv.

    Yata hey
    'cause we enjoy it.
    Are you banging your head because of my comments or just because you enjoy doing it?

    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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    Either one works for me.

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Friend of mine who lives in an apt. complex, had a workman show up at 7am, unannounced, without notice from management, using a master key to enter his home. Workman was met by said friend, groggy from just being woke up after a late night at work and pointing a Kimber Ultra Carry II (compact 1911) at him.

    Long story short -- workman calls police, police show up and ask my friend if there are loaded weapons in the house as they must secure them during the investigation. Said police did not know how to clear the Kimber or the AR-15. I found that surprising, but in that jurisdiction police do not carry or use AR-15s. Apparently much more common than one would think. (Friend did not get in any trouble and LEO verbally noticed manager of wisdom of providing appropriate notice of workmen).
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    color of law wrote:
    When one of my friends wants to hand me one of their new toys and I never handled that particular toy, I won't take it until I know it's unloaded and he shows me how it operates first. I don't like surprises.

    same thing with me..

    awhile back,a guy i knew wanted to show me the gun he bought.he proceeded to unholster it and began to hand it to me(can't remember what make it was,just that it was 9mm)with hammer back,safety on and also a round in the pipe.now considering i have working knowledge of my 92D which doesn't have a exposed hammer nor external safety,i had to tell him not until he decocks and unloads it..

    hewas eithernew to firearm safety(cause he gave me a puzzled look),or he thought cause i own a gun myself that i know how they all work..

    Workman was met by said friend, groggy from just being woke up after a late night at work and pointing a Kimber Ultra Carry II (compact 1911) at him.
    i bet workman needed a change of shorts after that...



  20. #20
    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Wrong button .. didn't mean to post
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    They never give notice to work jobs here, and they give out master keys like water (I've had the master keys a few times even). I've yet to 'meet' someone at gunpoint, but it's bound to happen sooner or later. I could push written notice in advance for work orders and such, but management is so incompetent they would just make it worse somehow.

  22. #22
    Regular Member Beau's Avatar
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    deepdiver wrote:
    Friend of mine who lives in an apt. complex, had a workman show up at 7am, unannounced, without notice from management, using a master key to enter his home. Workman was met by said friend, groggy from just being woke up after a late night at work and pointing a Kimber Ultra Carry II (compact 1911) at him.

    Long story short -- workman calls police, police show up and ask my friend if there are loaded weapons in the house as they must secure them during the investigation. Said police did not know how to clear the Kimber or the AR-15. I found that surprising, but in that jurisdiction police do not carry or use AR-15s. Apparently much more common than one would think. (Friend did not get in any trouble and LEO verbally noticed manager of wisdom of providing appropriate notice of workmen).
    I'm confused on why they needed to secure the weapon? No crime was commited. I don't see that the police even had a right to enter the home. It should have ended after "I entered a persons home unanounced and they pointed a weapon at me". Proper police response after that should have been "Wellll no ****".
    Colorado Gun Owners - COGO
    http://www.ColoradoGunOwners.com

    A discussion forum for Colorado Gun Owners.

    Colorado Firearm law.
    http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/colorado/
    Lexis Nexis: Colorado law pertaining to firearms.
    Title 18, Article 12

  23. #23
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    In Virginia, state law requires advance notice of all non-emergency repair work. Good common sense/practice suggests that the maintenance personnel ring the door bell or knock hard and wait. If they then open the door, they are instructed to holler out "Maintenance!" and wait a few seconds before calling out again. These instructions including entering for an emergency - it is a matter of courtesy and safety - further this is documented in most lease agreements.
    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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