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Thread: Anti gun editorial in the Plain Dealer

  1. #1
    State Researcher dng's Avatar
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    http://www.cleveland.com/politics/pl...xml&coll=2


    Editorial: Gun laws need to be strengthened and enforced to keep criminals disarmed


    Tuesday, December 18, 2007


    The gun lobby likes to say that guns don't kill people - people kill people. Yes, we do, because it's true. That's why meaningful gun laws should target people inclined to kill and keep them from buying a gun with which to do it. The criminals ignore the laws we have now, what a more laws going to do?

    That gun laws are far from meaningful was made clear by Plain Dealer reporters Rachel Dissell and Christopher Evans in their Sunday examination of why it's so hard to track the ownership of guns used in crimes.

    There are thousands of reasons why more laws are needed - 6,135 to be exact. That's how many guns sold in Ohio were used in crimes last year. And that's just the recovered guns. Many never will be found. They're tossed in the lake, buried or handed off to confederates. It seems whenever someone cannot really defend their beliefs, they always resort to personal insults or attacks.

    Certainly, there's no magic measure that can keep gang members, drug dealers or teens seeking to look big in the neighborhood from buying guns illegally. Then why add more laws that are supposed to be able to fix everything? It's a people problem, not a gun problem. A pistol can be had for $30 or less on Cleveland's streets. I would love to see some data that wouldshowhowdriving up the price ofguns stops crime. It doesn't; criminals are willing to pay big money for guns.

    But targeted measures aimed at making sure that those prohibited from gun ownership can't easily acquire guns through illicit or straw purchases could drive up the street price considerably. A straw purchase takes place when someone with a clean record - often a girlfriend or a spouse - pretends to be the weapon's buyer but is actually a front for the intended owner. The U.S. attorney's office in Cleveland has gone after 30 such fake buyers in recent years, but could mount a stronger effort to advertise the risks for straw buyers.

    Yet, as Dissell's and Evans' story revealed, instead of pushing new laws to protect citizens, legislators seem busy enacting laws to tie the hands of law enforcement and to protect gun sellers from liability for hazy sales practices.

    Cleveland police last year traced 123 guns used in city crimes to one Bedford Heights dealership, Atlantic Gun & Tackle. A spokesman for the family-owned firm told the reporters this was a consequence of its high sales volume - not its sales practices. If that's the case, then more openness about gun sales data is warranted - not less.

    At a minimum, the Ohio legislature should not hamstring cities from being able to regulate and track firearms purchases or inspect dealerships. Regulating firearm purchases (such as restricting the number of guns that can be purchased in a month) is a violation of my 2nd amendment rights. And I want to see some proof that shows tracking firearms prevents crime. Cleveland had a tough assault-weapons ban until the state's concealed-weapons law invalidated it. That's simply wrong. And that "tough assault weapons ban" did NOTHING to make Cleveland safe. The criminals do not care what laws we pass; they will still have guns, and the only people that obeyed that law were the honest law abiding citizens who are not a thread to society. As usual, another law punished the law abiders rather than the law breakers.

    Even worse has been a series of federal law changes since 2002 that severely restricts access to and analysis of federal gun-trace data. These laws - most of them sponsored by Kansas Rep. Todd Tiahrt - appear purely motivated by the desire to shield the firearms industry at the expense of crime victims.

    Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and city safety officials get it, as do officials in scores of other cities - but they need help having their message heard by lawmakers in Washington, Columbus and other capitals. At a time of rising gun violence in America's cities again, fix the people, and the gun "problem" will be fixed, coddling the industry and hiding the truth about why buying guns is so easy is no longer acceptable. Buying guns should be easy; it is a constitutional right! If you ban guns, the criminals will use knives, ban knives, they'll use bats, ban bats, and they'll use sticks, etc.

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    Regular Member Mainsail's Avatar
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    That gun laws are far from meaningful was made clear by Plain Dealer reporters Rachel Dissell and Christopher Evans in their Sunday examination of why it's so hard to track the ownership of guns used in crimes.
    The author misses the most obvious point, one he wasn’t trying to make. If you have gotten to the point where you need to track the owner of a firearm, the crime has already been committed. Wouldn’t it be more efficient to prevent the crime in the first place? If one is armed to defend oneself, there likely wouldn’t be a victim, and without a victim, there isn’t a crime.

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    Accomplished Advocate color of law's Avatar
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    Yet, as Dissell's and Evans' story revealed, instead of pushing new laws to protect citizens, legislators seem busy enacting laws to tie the hands of law enforcement and to protect gun sellers from liability for hazy sales practices.

    Laws don't protect anybody. Ask any woman that got a restraining order against a boyfriend or husband.

    Hazy sales practices. ATF approves each and every sale.


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    I say we repeal all gun laws and start over and make sensible laws that apply nationwide - but do not inhibit or interfere with anyone's right to carry anyway they choose whenever, wherever they choose.

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    State Researcher dng's Avatar
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    Mainsail wrote:
    That gun laws are far from meaningful was made clear by Plain Dealer reporters Rachel Dissell and Christopher Evans in their Sunday examination of why it's so hard to track the ownership of guns used in crimes.
    The author misses the most obvious point, one he wasn’t trying to make. If you have gotten to the point where you need to track the owner of a firearm, the crime has already been committed. Wouldn’t it be more efficient to prevent the crime in the first place? If one is armed to defend oneself, there likely wouldn’t be a victim, and without a victim, there isn’t a crime.
    +1 well said, but I wonder if that's another point he skipped because it does not support his arguments.

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