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Thread: Dont know what could have happened...

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    Were you sitting there with your doors unlocked?:what:

    Were you sitting there with the motor running trying to commit suicide by carbon-monoxide posioning?:what:

    It could have been someone up to no good but more than likely someone checking to see if you were alive and you scared the crap out of them by pulling a gun on them. I came across a lady in a similar situation early one morningand checked on her. We banged on the window and no response. Finally we opened the door and she was passed out drunk with the motor running and the car still in gear. We called the police and lket them handle it. Late that afternoon we saw her driving around town. Some way she evidently had avoided getting locked up and had at least sobered up enough to try and drive.

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    If it was someone checking to see if he was ok, they most likely would have tapped on the drivers side window before trying to open a door, I know I sure as hell ain't gonna try opening a door to an occupied car when I don't know the driver, at least not first thing. 'Course that might have slipped their mind, but I think erring on the side of caution was most definitally the best corse of action.

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    I agree with tapping on the window but sometimes people don't think. It could have been he has fell asleep and the tapping woke him up as the door opened. Just saying that it possibly could have been someone trying to help. For some reason I try to see the best in people rather than the worst.

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    I absolutely think you did the best thing pulling off when you realized how tired you were. Not far from here a while back there were two different accidents withing one week of drivers falling asleep resulting in 15 deaths. Ironically both were vans with families on there way to a funeral from up north to Florida. I had a cousin that about 40 years ago was found dead in his car. There was a hole in the exhaust system that allowed CO into the car. We are not sure how long it took but it wasn't that long.

    Just make sure you doors are locked next time and when you get sleepy pull off.

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    I really wanted to be able to make it closer to home, but Ive known people who have fallen asleep at the wheel (fortunately they all survived) and totalled their cars. Even if I have to pull over on I-5 in the emergency lane for a few minutes, I'll do what needs to be done to avoid be a frickin dozydrivin missile.

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    Crackajack wrote:
    I really wanted to be able to make it closer to home, but Ive known people who have fallen asleep at the wheel (fortunately they all survived) and totalled their cars. Even if I have to pull over on I-5 in the emergency lane for a few minutes, I'll do what needs to be done to avoid be a frickin dozydrivin missile.
    I've pretty much given up on the whole pulling-over to take a nap when driving while tired. If I pull into a rest area, on almost all occasions I have done so I encounter people who feel the need to walk over to my car and look inside... it's very disconcerting to open your eyes and see a person staring at you from outside your car window. I don't let the engine run, so apparently taking a nap in one's car is a foreign concept to most people. My other option would be to pull off on a shoulder, where people aren't as likely to bother me, but there's the unfortunate fact that I don't want another vehicle slamming into the back of mine. I'd rather take my chances and keep moving than provide a target for somone else to drive into.

    Er, was that a rant? At any rate, it's over...

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    imperialism2024 wrote:
    Crackajack wrote:
    I really wanted to be able to make it closer to home, but Ive known people who have fallen asleep at the wheel (fortunately they all survived) and totalled their cars. Even if I have to pull over on I-5 in the emergency lane for a few minutes, I'll do what needs to be done to avoid be a frickin dozydrivin missile.
    I've pretty much given up on the whole pulling-over to take a nap when driving while tired. If I pull into a rest area, on almost all occasions I have done so I encounter people who feel the need to walk over to my car and look inside... it's very disconcerting to open your eyes and see a person staring at you from outside your car window. I don't let the engine run, so apparently taking a nap in one's car is a foreign concept to most people. My other option would be to pull off on a shoulder, where people aren't as likely to bother me, but there's the unfortunate fact that I don't want another vehicle slamming into the back of mine. I'd rather take my chances and keep moving than provide a target for somone else to drive into.

    Er, was that a rant? At any rate, it's over...
    If you would just quit all that late nightcatting around you could avoid the problem and not worry about it. :P Nothing good happens after midnight. I was driving late one night and caught myself dozing. It scared me so bad that the adrenalin kept me awake for the rest of the trip. It is not a good feeling.

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    PT111 wrote:
    If you would just quit all that late nightcatting around you could avoid the problem and not worry about it. :P Nothing good happens after midnight. I was driving late one night and caught myself dozing. It scared me so bad that the adrenalin kept me awake for the rest of the trip. It is not a good feeling.
    Thats exactly what happened to me once. I was only 5-10 miles away from home and was really tired. I rolled the windows down to let in the cold air and was singing to the radio. I blinked once or twice, then I realized my eyes hadn't opened back up from blinking. That shocked me enough to wake me up until I got home. Couldn't fall asleep for another hour or so.

    I've used rest stops a few times on my from NC to MN and back. My theory was I'd find a group of cars that looked like they hadn't gone anywhere for a while (snow on the ground helps), then I parked a spot or two away from them. That way I wasn't out in the middle of the parking lot by myself, but I didn't have people constantly parking next to me and walking around. This was before I carried a firearm, but I had a folding knife in my pocket, and a sheathed fixed blade on my lap in my hands as I slept.

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    DreQo wrote:
    PT111 wrote:
    If you would just quit all that late nightcatting around you could avoid the problem and not worry about it. :P Nothing good happens after midnight. I was driving late one night and caught myself dozing. It scared me so bad that the adrenalin kept me awake for the rest of the trip. It is not a good feeling.
    Thats exactly what happened to me once. I was only 5-10 miles away from home and was really tired. I rolled the windows down to let in the cold air and was singing to the radio. I blinked once or twice, then I realized my eyes hadn't opened back up from blinking. That shocked me enough to wake me up until I got home. Couldn't fall asleep for another hour or so.

    I've used rest stops a few times on my from NC to MN and back. My theory was I'd find a group of cars that looked like they hadn't gone anywhere for a while (snow on the ground helps), then I parked a spot or two away from them. That way I wasn't out in the middle of the parking lot by myself, but I didn't have people constantly parking next to me and walking around. This was before I carried a firearm, but I had a folding knife in my pocket, and a sheathed fixed blade on my lap in my hands as I slept.
    Fortunately for me, it doesn't come on suddenly... I just struggle to keep awake, and it's almost painful to stay conscious. But a +1 on how well adrenaline works to keep oneself awake...

    ETA: And to bring this back around to OC and firearms, I've often wondered how effective I would be at assessing and then taking action against a threat immediately after waking up. I know even when I have that surge of adrenaline from the alarm clock, I'm not completely coherent.

  12. #12
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    imperialism2024 wrote:
    ETA: And to bring this back around to OC and firearms, I've often wondered how effective I would be at assessing and then taking action against a threat immediately after waking up. I know even when I have that surge of adrenaline from the alarm clock, I'm not completely coherent.
    Well that is a good point. One of the times that I drove home I was feeling very tired, but my eyes weren't getting heavy so I pushed on. I got home, and slept for a while. When I woke up, remembering the last hour or so of the drive was like trying to remember a night of heavy drinking.

    On that same token, walking to the bathroom in the middle of the night involves a lot of stumbling for me at times, again feeling like I'm drunk. Being over-tired can be very similiar to being drunk. I would hope that the adrenaline in a bad situation would help you overcome being tired..

    Hmm now I'm thinking about something. We all know guns and alcohol don't mix, just like cars and alcohol don't mix. They've done studies where they put a drunk driver in a safe, controlled environment to show the effects of alcohol on driving. I wonder what would happen if they did the same for firearm usage? For instance, using simunitions, stage a self-defense situation with a person who is drunk, or over-tired. It would be very interesting to see how someone would do. Hell, I'd like to see how I did. It would be good to know my own boundaries.

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    DreQo wrote:
    Hmm now I'm thinking about something. We all know guns and alcohol don't mix, just like cars and alcohol don't mix. They've done studies where they put a drunk driver in a safe, controlled environment to show the effects of alcohol on driving. I wonder what would happen if they did the same for firearm usage? For instance, using simunitions, stage a self-defense situation with a person who is drunk, or over-tired. It would be very interesting to see how someone would do. Hell, I'd like to see how I did. It would be good to know my own boundaries.
    Well, as for the drinking and shooting situation, DH and HankT had it out a while ago about that...

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