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Thread: BBC Radio 5 presenter threatened with a gun when testing safety of Britain's streets

  1. #1
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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...n_page_id=1770

    I'm sure she set out to write some fluff piece and got a eyefull.

    Here's another article:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/m...de/7212556.stm

    "A car with blacked out windows pulled up alongside us, out from the passenger window comes an arm with a gun attached to it, I could clearly see the viewfinder light on the gun."
    What the hell does that even mean? Probably something like my "pistol scope" I was questioned about at the Bloomberg Gun Giveaway (it was a flashlight).
    -Unrequited

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    Nyaah. It was a camera, cameras have viewfinders and she is qualified to identify cameras. She needed a 'gun' for her story and invented one from a camera's viewfinder.

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    Regular Member IanB's Avatar
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    breakfast@bbc.co.uk



    Radio 5 Live crew:


    Just read the story about Ms. Fogarty having a handgun pointed at her. I'm sorry that a criminal threatened your reporter in such a brazen manner and I sincerely hope that person is caught and justice is served.

    I'm from America where firearms are not uncommon, I own a few myself to include several handguns. A quote from the story caught my interest:

    "A car with blacked out windows pulled up alongside us, out from the passenger window comes an arm with a gun attached to it, I could clearly see the viewfinder light on the gun."

    Can you clarify what this "viewfinder light" is all about? Aren't viewfinders found on cameras? Handguns generally have iron sights on them that produce no light. Some iron sights have tiny tritium inserts which glow in the dark, but they face rearward toward the shooter. Ms. Fogarty would not have seen those even had they been facing her way, they are just too small and dark to see from further than about 3 feet away. Other sighting aids for handguns include scopes and laser illuminators. Of these, only the laser emits a light which Ms. Fogarty would be able to see. Is this a case of English language referring to something as a "viewfinder" when Americans would call it a "laser"?

    -NSL
    Northern Virginia, USA


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    Hah. I don't think it's anything lost in translation...

    http://www.google.com/search?q=%22vi...ght%22+handgun

    returns nothing useful but this story. I always wondered, if they call flashlights torches... what do they call Indiana Jones-type pieces of wood with fire on top?

    *sigh* That's a question for TrueBrit...
    -Unrequited

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    Naaaah it couldn't have been a gun.... they are illegal over there.

    :P

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    Regular Member Neplusultra's Avatar
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    unrequited wrote:
    I always wondered, if they call flashlights torches... what do they call Indiana Jones-type pieces of wood with fire on top?
    #1 "Flashlights", DUH! And a close #2 "Flaming *******".

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    Neplusultra wrote:
    unrequited wrote:
    I always wondered, if they call flashlights torches... what do they call Indiana Jones-type pieces of wood with fire on top?
    And a close #2 "Flaming *******".
    No man, it'd just be "flaming ****". :P

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    USAF_MetalChris wrote:
    Neplusultra wrote:
    unrequited wrote:
    I always wondered, if they call flashlights torches... what do they call Indiana Jones-type pieces of wood with fire on top?
    And a close #2 "Flaming *******".
    No man, it'd just be "flaming ****". :P
    In the UK a Flaming *** would be a cigarette that's burning too rapidly

    And we all know that what the reporter saw couldn't have been a gun becasue there are no guns in the UK. Their banned, remember?

  9. #9
    Regular Member Neplusultra's Avatar
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    lildobe wrote:
    In the UK a Flaming *** would be a cigarette that's burning too rapidly
    Boys, boys, fellas, a Flaming ****** is a bundle of sticks used to start a fire, the same root word as is found in fascisim. Which may be why most socialist states/politicians support faggotry. A ***, less the "got", is UK slang for a cigarette. A flaming *** (in the UK) would be a cigarette on fire such as might happen when someone drunk lights a cigarette in the center. But a "Flaming ******" in correct English is an "on fire" bundle of wood used to light a fire, aka, a torch, aka, a flashlight.

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    nakedshoplifter wrote:
    breakfast@bbc.co.uk



    Radio 5 Live crew:


    Just read the story about Ms. Fogarty having a handgun pointed at her. I'm sorry that a criminal threatened your reporter in such a brazen manner and I sincerely hope that person is caught and justice is served.

    I'm from America where firearms are not uncommon, I own a few myself to include several handguns. A quote from the story caught my interest:

    "A car with blacked out windows pulled up alongside us, out from the passenger window comes an arm with a gun attached to it, I could clearly see the viewfinder light on the gun."

    Can you clarify what this "viewfinder light" is all about? Aren't viewfinders found on cameras? Handguns generally have iron sights on them that produce no light. Some iron sights have tiny tritium inserts which glow in the dark, but they face rearward toward the shooter. Ms. Fogarty would not have seen those even had they been facing her way, they are just too small and dark to see from further than about 3 feet away. Other sighting aids for handguns include scopes and laser illuminators. Of these, only the laser emits a light which Ms. Fogarty would be able to see. Is this a case of English language referring to something as a "viewfinder" when Americans would call it a "laser"?

    -NSL
    Northern Virginia, USA
    I'm very interested to see if there is any answer to this query. It makes me question her veracity.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    Was the arm robotic or something? Most of my guns can't actually be attached to my or any other human's arm.

    A video camera, with a viewfinder, seems to be much more likely. Those have straps on the side to "attach" to your "arm."

    "Yeah, it was a gun. You know..... The ones that collect light."

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