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Thread: Celts

  1. #1
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    Is it just me or do a bunch of us have celtic ancesters. My grandparents all immigrated here from Europe. Dad's side from Ireland(grandfather) and Scotland(grandmother) and mom's side from Ireland(grandfather) and Poland(grandmother).

    So where do your ancestors come from?

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    Ireland, Greece and Hungary. Then again isn't delaware a prominently irish state?

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    Concidering that there are 10 times the Irish in the USA then there are in Ireland I think they are everywhere.

    I'm not just limiting this to the Irish but all celts weather from any country of Europe before the Germans set about killing them all. Ireland just seems to be the most densely populated. Very few Scots celts left. Same for Brits. But they were also in France and Spain from what I read.

    Grandmother was from the McDonald clan (highlander) in Scotland. Less the 100,000 left in Scotland. Minority in Britain, France and Spain as well.

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    As I commented on Chef's tattoo (Celtic Cross) I am Irish-American also

    I in fact hunt in Ireland & possess a Irish FAC (Firearms Certificate) my camo and beretta 391 are stored by my hunting buddy and landlord

    the attached pic is me shooting clay pidgeons(skeet) in No. Ireland with my beretta

    Sla`n

    sprat
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    ChefW wrote:
    Ireland, Greece and Hungary. Then again isn't delaware a prominently irish state?
    Delaware was actually settled by the Swedish.

    My great-great-great-great-great-great-great-(ad nauseum) grandfather, Hermanus Wiltbank, was Dutch, but had pledged loyalties to Sweden in the early 1600's.

    He sailed from Sweden to New York in the 1630's and was given a land grant by the Duke of York for Delaware -- he sailed south where his ship was wrecked just off of the coast. He'a recognized as the original settler of Sussex County and, in the late 1600's he was the High Sheriff of Sussex and died of a stroke weeks before he was supposed to travel to New Castle County to meet with William Penn who had just landed on his ship, Friendship.

    My family has been firmly planted in Delaware's history for close to 400 years now, which is pretty cool, I think.

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    My father's side is from County Wexford.
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    I am eitherthe 5th or 6th generation born here in the USA (still researching that). My Irish surname gives my heritage away.When my "family" first came to the States, they dropped the O' from our name to make it sound more American. Otherwise, I'd be saying stuff like "top o' the mornin' to ya" and drinking Guiness all the time.LOL.


    Dave
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    Nothing wrong with drinking the greatest beer in the world. :celebrate

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    I traced my Dad's side back to Co. Offally (central Ireland). I went to Ireland and never went inland. I did the circle around the Island. I didn't get a chance to go see the Peet Boggs.

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    Dave



    real Irish people do not say "top o the morning" thats hollywood, you would not be well recieved, if you did that in Eire

    try "how are you keeping lad" and "ah thats grand"also corned beef is american, Irish folks eat Ham and cabbage, not corned beef and cabbage. (a Ham and cabbage dinner is called bacon and cabbage)

    food for thought

    oh off to the range, here in Pa

    sprat

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    sprat wrote:
    real Irish people do not say "top o the morning" thats hollywood, you would not be well recieved, if you did that in Eire

    try "how are you keeping lad" and "ah thats grand"also corned beef is american, Irish folks eat Ham and cabbage, not corned beef and cabbage. (a Ham and cabbage dinner is called bacon and cabbage)
    Sometimes I wonder how I "became" Irish, because I really don't like Guiness, nor do I like cabbage. I'd probably starve/dehydrate if I ever went to Ireland. :shock:

    I do like corned beef though, and I knew it was American (even though Irish Restaurants here serve it in their sandwiches)...


    Dave
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    With my pronounced and distinctly Dutch/Swedish/American family roots, I am a *huge* fan of Irish culture and traditional music. I run a website called WhistleThis (http://whistlethis.com/) where (when I was really active with it), I would post a new traditional tune every two weeks or so, people could download the music and sample, learn it on the tin whistle, then upload a recording of them playing it for critique and suggestions.

    Every Wednesday night (including tonight!), I play at A Piece of Ireland in Newark, DE (http://apieceofireland-newark.com/) at 9pm. It's a basic traditional Irish session, mostly instrumental.... You guys should feel free to stop by.

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    One of the items on my bucket List is to learn to play the pipes and go out to the Veterans cemetary to play a few tunes in honor of their sacrifice. Chokes me up thinking about it.

    When I was dating my wife, I moved in with her and her parents. We went to Ireland and I bought a practice chanter. When we got back I started practicing "Danny Boy" upstairs and a big story told even today was how her Dad would be downstairs saying, "How long do we have to listen to this Sh*#". hehehe

    Man, it's tough!

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    Ayep... and those are highland pipes. Irish use Uilleann Pipes which are made for indoors and quite different from the others.

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    Yep, I thought about a set of Uilleann pipes, but I want to blast a tune for all to hear. It will be awhile before I can afford a good set of pipes. I though about going the cheaper route and buy a set of Pakistani pipes, but I decided otherwise. I believe that in most instances, it doesn't cost more to go first class. Anything less usually doesn't last as long.

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    OneShot wrote:
    Yep, I thought about a set of Uilleann pipes, but I want to blast a tune for all to hear. It will be awhile before I can afford a good set of pipes. I though about going the cheaper route and buy a set of Pakistani pipes, but I decided otherwise. I believe that in most instances, it doesn't cost more to go first class. Anything less usually doesn't last as long.
    DON'T go Pakistani, they truely are horrible... I highly recommend Seth Gallagher -- pricely and probably an 18 month wait, but they're well worth it.

    Here's a video of me on the guitar and my buddy Dan on the pipes playing a tune at the pub: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9FAji8pxzg

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    Not pagpipes! Can't think of any instrument that makes such a awful song. Grew up with a next door neighbor(played violin for the Philadelphia Philharmonic) who played the pipes everynight after dinner. Sounds to much like a couple of cats being swung around by their tails. Just kidding.

    Sprats going to blow alot of misinformation away for many of us. Grew up eating ham and cabbage, didn't know it was an Irish dish. I thought beer and potatos were the main staples. Hard growing up without both being on the menu. Luckily my family adopted dishes from other cultures quickly. If it tastes good we'd try to copy the recipe.

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    Yeah, I think I'll stick to wearing my kilt. That way everyone thinks I play bagpipes anyway, but I don't have to make them suffer.

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    Kilts are a scottish thing as are bag pipes, no self respecting irishman plays the bagpipes only Irish americans. butthe uilleann pipes are Irish and ancient at that

    real irish are not the same as us transplants, forget those Hollywood stereotypes

    sorry lads to burst your bubbles

    Sla`n agus bannagh (cheers and good luck)

    sprat

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    WOOHOO! Awesome bro!

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    Never been to Ireland, relatives seldom spoke of Europe. Misinformation abounds. Gots some learnin' to do.

    Hard to even find out which part of the Islands my families came from. Ancestry.com says my Irish family is part of the O'Niel clan from County Antrim. Spelling of the name changes several times, not unusual considering they couldn't read or write and trying to use phonetics to a heavy accent didn't help. Not sure of the accuaracy since records were destroyed.

    Scottish grandmother was the only one to talk of family, guess the name MacDonald meant something to her. Seems like a fairly large clan. So at least the Kilts,tartars and pipes are a part of one side of my family.

    Never heard of Uilleann pipes, I'll stick to the piano and drums. One makes music the other just a beat. I Look like 'animal' from Sesame Street when playing drums.:celebrate

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    stephpd?

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    Kilts are a scottish thing as are bag pipes, no self respecting irishman plays the bagpipes only Irish americans.
    Celtic does not mean Irish. The Celts are a people group that spread all over Europe. The Scots, Irish, and Welsh are all Celts. Kilts are gaelic and therefore celtic, but not Irish.

    And yes all Irish bagpiping and kilt-wearing was either imposed by the English or (in an odd turn of events) is a political display to show Gaelic unity and snub the English.

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    Regular Member dave_in_delaware's Avatar
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    I just thought I'd throw this in the mix.... I like the quote.



    Us Irish are a strong pig-headed bunch, aren't we? LOL.
    Dave
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    Yes Jeff

    Scots and welsh are celt's, and speakvariations of gaelic, but kilts and bagpipes are not native to Irish culture, they are as you pointed out Engish importations

    Dave the IRA no longer exist, it officially disbanded a few years back per the good friday agreement

    sprat

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