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Thread: USA Today front page article on the the upcoming SCOTUS case

  1. #1
    Regular Member possumboy's Avatar
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    http://www.usatoday.com/news/washing...terstitialskip

    The "Key dates in debate" column leaves out the 1968 Gun Control Act (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_Control_Act)

    Anyone planning on showing up on March 18?

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    I'd really like to. In fact I think spring break starts the day before. I'll check into it more and see if I can make it.

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    Making it and showing-up where, SCOTUS?

    Visiting the Court http://www.supremecourtus.gov/visiting/visiting.html

    Courtroom seating http://www.supremecourtus.gov/visiti...alargument.pdf

    All oral arguments are open to the public, but seating is limited and on a first-come, first-seated basis. Before a session begins, two lines form on the plaza in front of the building. One is for those who wish to attend an entire argument, and the other, a three-minute line, is for those who wish to observe the Court in session only briefly. Please do not hold a space in either line for others who have not yet arrived.

    Seating for the first argument begins at 9:30 a.m. and seating for the three-minute line begins at 10 a.m. The locations for these lines are marked with signs and there is a police officer on duty to answer your questions.

    Visitors should be aware that cases may attract large crowds, with lines forming before the building opens. Obviously there are unavoidable delays associated with processing and seating large numbers of visitors, and your cooperation and patience are appreciated. Court police officers will make every effort to inform you as soon as possible whether you can expect to secure a seat in the Courtroom.

    Groups with reserved seats should line up to the right of the three-minute line.

    You will go through a security checkpoint as you enter the building and again as you enter the Courtroom. Weapons or other dangerous or illegal items are not allowed on the grounds or in the building. Please refrain from taking the following items into the Courtroom when Court is in session: cameras, radios, pagers, tape players, cell phones, tape recorders, other electronic equipment, hats, overcoats, magazines and books, briefcases and luggage. Sunglasses, identification tags (other than military), display buttons and inappropriate clothing may not be worn. A checkroom is available on the first floor to check coats and other personal belongings. Coin operated (quarters only) lockers for cameras and other valuables are available. The checkroom closes 30 minutes after Court adjourns.

    We do not recommend taking infants or small children into the courtroom.

    When the Court adjourns for lunch all persons must leave the Courtroom and the Great Hall. Persons attending the afternoon session must line up again on the Front Plaza to gain admission.

  4. #4
    Anti-Saldana Freedom Fighter Venator's Avatar
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    Doug Huffman wrote:
    Making it and showing-up where, SCOTUS?

    Visiting the Court http://www.supremecourtus.gov/visiting/visiting.html

    Courtroom seating http://www.supremecourtus.gov/visiti...alargument.pdf

    All oral arguments are open to the public, but seating is limited and on a first-come, first-seated basis. Before a session begins, two lines form on the plaza in front of the building. One is for those who wish to attend an entire argument, and the other, a three-minute line, is for those who wish to observe the Court in session only briefly. Please do not hold a space in either line for others who have not yet arrived.

    Seating for the first argument begins at 9:30 a.m. and seating for the three-minute line begins at 10 a.m. The locations for these lines are marked with signs and there is a police officer on duty to answer your questions.

    Visitors should be aware that cases may attract large crowds, with lines forming before the building opens. Obviously there are unavoidable delays associated with processing and seating large numbers of visitors, and your cooperation and patience are appreciated. Court police officers will make every effort to inform you as soon as possible whether you can expect to secure a seat in the Courtroom.

    Groups with reserved seats should line up to the right of the three-minute line.

    You will go through a security checkpoint as you enter the building and again as you enter the Courtroom. Weapons or other dangerous or illegal items are not allowed on the grounds or in the building. Please refrain from taking the following items into the Courtroom when Court is in session: cameras, radios, pagers, tape players, cell phones, tape recorders, other electronic equipment, hats, overcoats, magazines and books, briefcases and luggage. Sunglasses, identification tags (other than military), display buttons and inappropriate clothing may not be worn. A checkroom is available on the first floor to check coats and other personal belongings. Coin operated (quarters only) lockers for cameras and other valuables are available. The checkroom closes 30 minutes after Court adjourns.

    We do not recommend taking infants or small children into the courtroom.

    When the Court adjourns for lunch all persons must leave the Courtroom and the Great Hall. Persons attending the afternoon session must line up again on the Front Plaza to gain admission.
    Are people allowed to gather outside, even though they may not get in? A large crowd that is supporting the individual right to bear arms would make an impression on the court as well as the media. In other words can they demonstrate outside the building or nearby without permits?
    An Amazon best seller "MY PARENTS OPEN CARRY" http://www.myparentsopencarry.com/

    *The information contained above is not meant to be legal advice, but is solely intended as a starting point for further research. These are my opinions, if you have further questions it is advisable to seek out an attorney that is well versed in firearm law.

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    The Court is not even considering the 'right to bear arms.' Broadly speaking it may be considering the right to keep arms.

    The Justices have gotten there by virtue of, among many other things, their ability to be influenced by only by what is on point.

    This being D. C. I suspect a permit will be required.

  6. #6
    Regular Member possumboy's Avatar
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    Doug Huffman wrote:
    Making it and showing-up where, SCOTUS?

    Visiting the Court http://www.supremecourtus.gov/visiting/visiting.html

    Courtroom seating http://www.supremecourtus.gov/visiti...alargument.pdf
    Yes to both. Sometimes I forget that not everyone works across the street from theSCOTUS building.

    Not going to be there everyday. Just plan on showing up with my "Guns Save Lives" button. Which is what I do just about everyday...

    Also planning on wearing my empty holster into DC during the entire period - the 1911 holster, not the sub-compact 9mm. I wonder if I could get a Serpa?:P

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