Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: You can't shop at Target and Open Carry

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    1,422

    Post imported post

    "To-go" containers of wine at a Milwaukee-area Target(tm) store.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Wisconsin Carry, Inc. Shotgun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    2,668

    Post imported post

    I doubt Target has a Class B license. I've never seen a bar in a Target store, although I have seen Starbucks inside Target.

    Besides, just carry your shotgun or rifle into bars!:celebrate
    A. Gold

    Failure to comply may result in discipline up to and including termination.
    The free man is a warrior. - Nietzsche "Twilight of the Idols"

  3. #3
    Campaign Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    , Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    908

    Post imported post

    This is from the Wisconsin Dept of revenue web site.

    1. What types of alcohol beverage licenses are there?
      • Class "A" fermented malt beverage licenses allow retail sale of fermented malt beverages (beer) for consumption off the premises. Examples: grocery or convenience stores.
      • "Class A" liquor licenses allow retail sale of intoxicating liquor (including wine) for consumption off the premises. Examples: liquor stores or grocery stores with full liquor sales sections.
      • Class "B" fermented malt beverage licenses allow retail sale of fermented malt beverages (beer) for consumption on or off the premises. Examples: restaurants, "beer bars."
      • "Class B" liquor licenses allow retail sale of intoxicating liquor (including wine) for consumption on the premises, and wine in original containers for consumption off the premises. If the community elects to, it may also permit sale of not more than four liters of intoxicating liquor (there are no limits on wine), in the original container, for consumption off the premises. Check local ordinances for the allowance. State law also allows carryout of a single, opened (resealed) bottle of wine if sold with a meal. Examples: taverns and restaurants with full alcohol service.
      • "Class C" wine licenses allow the sale of wine for consumption only on the premises and allow the carryout of a single opened (resealed) bottle if sold with a meal.
      • Temporary Class B licenses (often called picnic licenses) allow retail beer and/or wine sales, for consumption on the premises, at temporary events like fairs and festivals. Only certain organizations qualify for such a license. They must be bona-fide clubs, county or local fair associations, churches, lodges, or societies that have been in existence for at least six months.
      There are several other locally issued licenses or state issued permits that allow retail sale of alcohol beverages under certain circumstances. The licenses listed above are the most common, however.

    It appears a class B license applies to any establishment that sells beer or wine for on sale or off sale consumption. It also applies to up to four liters of hard liquor if authorized by the issuing community. I guess the word here is to tread carefully.

    Just another example of Wisconsin's stupid gun laws.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Saukville, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    233

    Post imported post

    This is a non-inclusive list of licenses. A "Class B" or Class "B"license holder can allow the consumption of alcohol on the premises. Technically, until the Class B was recently issued (Doyle actually did something right signing this one) I could go into a local place that had a Class C license only and carry without violating this law.

    Rule of thumb, if liquor can beconsumed there, then handgun carry is off-limits. You could also just carry a longsword!

    Now,my question is,doesChapter 125include the issuance of temporary permits?

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Waukesha, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    721

    Post imported post

    Lammie wrote:
      • Class "B" fermented malt beverage licenses allow retail sale of fermented malt beverages (beer) for consumption on or off the premises. Examples: restaurants, "beer bars."
      • "Class B" liquor licenses allow retail sale of intoxicating liquor (including wine) for consumption on the premises, and wine in original containers for consumption off the premises. If the community elects to, it may also permit sale of not more than four liters of intoxicating liquor (there are no limits on wine), in the original container, for consumption off the premises. Check local ordinances for the allowance. State law also allows carryout of a single, opened (resealed) bottle of wine if sold with a meal. Examples: taverns and restaurants with full alcohol service.
    It seems to me that the key here is "beer". In the first bullet the beer may be consumed on or off the premises. The question is, what is the definition of "retail sale". So a grocery store selling liquor in its store fits this definition due to the OR.

    For the second one, hard liquor and wine can be consumed on premises AND wine for consumption off premises. So a grocery store does not sell hard stuff to be consumed on premesis AND off premises....only off premesis.

    Many grocery stores have separated liquor stores, though part of the same company. I wonder what would come of this situation.

    Going through the laws in this state make me go crazy......

  6. #6
    Campaign Veteran
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
    Posts
    1,413

    Post imported post

    smithman wrote:
    It seems to me that the key here is "beer". In the first bullet the beer may be consumed on or off the premises. The question is, what is the definition of "retail sale". So a grocery store selling liquor in its store fits this definition due to the OR.

    For the second one, hard liquor and wine can be consumed on premises AND wine for consumption off premises. So a grocery store does not sell hard stuff to be consumed on premesis AND off premises....only off premesis.

    Many grocery stores have separated liquor stores, though part of the same company. I wonder what would come of this situation.

    Going through the laws in this state make me go crazy......
    +1 The AND makes all the difference. I would think of a place like a Olive Garden would fit into this category. You can order a cocktail from the bar AND take home a bottle of their wine. IANAL but I do not believe Target would qualify under that definition.

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    147

    Post imported post

    I'm probably just naieve, but couldn't you call city hall and find out if they have a class B permit? I would think it would be public record....

  8. #8
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Waukesha, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    721

    Post imported post

    Brigdh wrote:
    I'm probably just naieve, but couldn't you call city hall and find out if they have a class B permit? I would think it would be public record....
    Good idea. I think this will also work. The permits come from the city I believe.

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Saukville, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    233

    Post imported post

    Oops I meant to type beer but typed liquor - but you guys got it. If you can drink what you buy on the premises, you can't carry.

    Licensing is actually done through the municipality, but only with permission from the State. That's what I was referencing about Doyle - in order for Saukville to get another Class B license, the State had to pass a law allowing it. There's a cap I guess.

  10. #10
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    1,422

    Post imported post

    Since you cannot consume the beverage there, this is good news!

    Thanks for all the input!

  11. #11
    State Researcher lockman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Elgin, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    1,202

    Post imported post

    I am a bit confused. There is a difference between sold for consumption on premises and sold for consumption off premise but is consumed on premise. It may be unlawful for a establishment to "serve you" but if you open a bottle on premise and consume it you may not be breaking the law.

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    1,422

    Post imported post

    http://nxt.legis.state.wi.us/nxt/gateway.dll/Prior%20Sessions/2005/bills05/15308/15309?f=templates$fn=document-frame.htm$3.0$q=%5Bfield%20folio-destination-name%3A'ab839'%5D$uq=$x=Advanced$up=1#LPHit1

    Under current law, with certain exceptions, no owner, lessee, or person in charge of a public place may allow the consumption of alcohol beverages on the premises unless that owner, lessee, or person in charge holds the appropriate license or permit. A "Class A" license authorizes the license holder to sell intoxicating liquor, including wine, at retail for consumption only off the licensed premises. One exception to the licensing requirement authorizes a "Class A" licensee to provide two wine taste samples of not more than three fluid ounces each, free of charge, for consumption on the licensed premises between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. However, municipalities may override this authorization and prohibit the provision of wine taste samples by "Class A" licensees.


  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Erie, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    108

    Post imported post

    Let me get this straight... you are riding a motorcycle while sipping a wine "juice box" from a straw?

    Yes, it does appear this is against the law.

    Pointman wrote:
    My wife bought a few "to-go" containers of wine at a Milwaukee-area Target(tm) store so we could drink and drive responsibly. (The uses of straws in the juice-box like packages while motorcycling is quite convenient.) It appears this is against the law.

  14. #14
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    1,422

    Post imported post

    :quirky Yeah, the little flexie-straws fit under a helmet real good. Wearing a helmet is definitely being responsible. Plus, we can just fold up the empties and put them in our pockets.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •