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Thread: condition yellow

  1. #1
    Regular Member XD40coyote's Avatar
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    Found this gem and a few other posts in the same threadsaying the same thing at gundebate.com 's forum.

    So why would someone NOT be alert before getting a ccw or starting to OC?

    I was always in cond yellow when I lived in Baltimore city, it was a given, why would anyone NOT be? Does carry somehow make a sheep a sheepdog? Why not be a sheepdog from the start? It would seem being in cond yellow is MORE important if you are unarmed! And yesI still am not carrying, and yetI still do the cond yellow sheepdog thing in even the "safest" places, like my driveway which is waaaay back.




    Well, I KNOW that I have avoided a crime by being armed -- and I didn't even have to draw!
    I guess if you were a good actor you could have done what I did without a gun. But I can tell you I was damn glad I had one.

    I am a college professor, having taught computer science in Oklahoma for about 27 years. My wife and family & I live in Edmond, a well to do suburb of Oklahoma City. Edmond is known for having a lot of police -- so our crime rate is low (but far from non-existent).

    My wife and I own a couple of businesses which I help her with (they are really her bailiwick, I already have a job that keeps me pretty busy). One of our businesses is a dry cleaners, at a major intersection in Edmond. One night about 10 pm I had to go there (the cleaners) to get something. Being a person who carries a gun, I am always watchful, especially at night and especially when doing high risk things (like going out to your car from Walmart, or operating an ATM, or unlocking the door to your business). As I was unlocking the door to the cleaners, I saw in the reflection of the store windows that a car passing through the parking lot behind me had stopped suddenly. This was enough to put me in condition Orange, as it is just plain suspect. I got the door unlocked, and moved in the store slightly, and whirled around to face this person. He had gotten out of his car, and was looking at me looking at him. This went on for a few seconds, then he got back in his car and took off.

    Now, I am convinced this person wanted to rob my store, but was put off because he could tell I knew he was up to no good and was watching him. Perhaps he figured I was armed because otherwise I would probably try to lock the door to keep him out, or maybe go in and call police. Hard to say. I know if he had approached me I would have drawn my gun and gone to low ready -- if he produced a weapon, mine would be pointed at him and he would have to decide if he really wanted to go on with this.

    If I wasn't armed, I probably never would have even seen him (judging from the way I used to be) and would probably have become a victim. Having the gun gave me the confidence to face him down, and ward off any attack.

    I have had my concealed carry license for over 8 years, and I have never had to draw it to defend myself so far. Thank God!

    Still, it is better to have it, and not need it, than to need it, and not have it.


    Anti-gunners often promise utopia if we pass more gun control laws -- but utopia is NOT one of our choices.


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    Carrying seems to snap some people into being responsible for their actions;others are just the same as before.

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    I was in Con Yellow a lot too, when necessary so it came easy when carrying.Prob 20 years in the Navy did thatandit just amakes sense to be aware of your surroundings no matter where you are. Running theengineering plant on a destroyer, you're always thinking about what-if'sand how to keep the ship alive.

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    I don't think most people think about their awareness or alertness beyond admonitions to be careful when walking down dark alleys or out to empty parking lots. And others who do may not share the language to convey it.

    Prior to taking CC classes I didn't have the language of condition colors to convey my alertness level. The only time I had heard those before were from the gov't post 9/11. My friends in HS, college and after always referred to our required level of alertnes by DEFCON because that was the best language we had to describe it. Even in martial arts and ROTC we talked about evaluating and overcoming risk and danger but did not evaluate it in the now common language.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    Regular Member XD40coyote's Avatar
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    I have only heard of the condition colors recently myself, but it simply put a name to what I had been doing all these years.

    I guess some of us are natural born sheepdogs. BTW that was also a new term, I had always labled it sheep and wolves, and some of usare good wolves.

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    XD40coyote wrote:
    I guess some of us are natural born sheepdogs. BTW that was also a new term, I had always labled it sheep and wolves, and some of usare good wolves.
    I'm a parakeet.

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    Regular Member XD40coyote's Avatar
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    LOL a parakeet.

    I am actually a coyote, I can be very annoying and naughty, but am loyal like the canine I am to those who treat me well. Plus for predatory nature I only kill rodents and foxes, and those pesky lil mink.

    My chinese zodiac animal is the rat, how's that for predator/ prey relations? BTW the last few nightsI have been trapping barn rats and setting the dead rats outside the fence. Last night I hung around out there a while and a red fox came around. I know who is eating the rats. I didn't kill the fox- seeI am nice!( had nothing to kill it with is the truth, but I lipsqueaked at it for the hell of it and it just stared at me- it should be killed, poor thing has mange- bare tail).



    [tinfoilhat]Ok I better shut up before the ATF agents watching this site put me on a prohibited list for mental illness.[/tinfoilhat]



    lol

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    I used to think of myself as a bear, until I discovered this meaning of the word... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bear_community :shock:

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    XD40coyote wrote:
    Does carry somehow make a sheep a sheepdog? Why not be a sheepdog from the start?
    If we're going to resort to that crude metaphor, the crucial distinction between sheepdogs and sheep is the possession of certain kinds of teeth. You can be in "Condition Yellow," but if you have teeth that are only suited for munching grass and not for rending flesh, then while you may tell yourself you're a sheepdog, what you actually are is a particularly alert sheep.

    That said, I volunteer as a tour guide at a wolf sanctuary, and I've never cared for the sheep/sheepdog/wolf metaphor. Wolves don't naturally consider sheep to be prey; counter-intuitive though this may sound, you can actually that this is the case from the way wolves can sometimes go into a killing frenzy after they kill one sheep. See, wolves' primary natural prey is ungulates: deer, elk, moose, that sort of thing. When you kill one member of a herd of deer or elk, the reaction of the rest of the herd is to scatter. Sheep, by contrast, react by clustering together intead of running. Wolves don't know what to make of that, and sometimes they react by killing more sheep, way more than they can eat.

    Wolves also don't form the largest threat to sheep, not by a long shot. In Sheep and Goats Death Loss (USDA NASS), in 2004, the number of sheep killed by wolves formed so low a percentage of predator deaths that wolves did not merit a separate mention (instead being lumped in with "all other predators"). Coyotes were the biggest perpetrators of predator killings (sorry, XD40coyote) with 60.5% of the total. Second up were dogs, with 13.3%. Interesting, no?

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Euromutt wrote:
    XD40coyote wrote:
    Does carry somehow make a sheep a sheepdog? Why not be a sheepdog from the start?
    If we're going to resort to that crude metaphor, the crucial distinction between sheepdogs and sheep is the possession of certain kinds of teeth. You can be in "Condition Yellow," but if you have teeth that are only suited for munching grass and not for rending flesh, then while you may tell yourself you're a sheepdog, what you actually are is a particularly alert sheep.

    That said, I volunteer as a tour guide at a wolf sanctuary, and I've never cared for the sheep/sheepdog/wolf metaphor. Wolves don't naturally consider sheep to be prey; counter-intuitive though this may sound, you can actually that this is the case from the way wolves can sometimes go into a killing frenzy after they kill one sheep. See, wolves' primary natural prey is ungulates: deer, elk, moose, that sort of thing. When you kill one member of a herd of deer or elk, the reaction of the rest of the herd is to scatter. Sheep, by contrast, react by clustering together intead of running. Wolves don't know what to make of that, and sometimes they react by killing more sheep, way more than they can eat.
    snip
    Um, from what you just said, the crucial difference between sheep dogs and sheep goes much deeper than teeth. Sheepdogs don't just cluster around after one of their own has been attacked or killed among other things.

    So let's change it to a sheepdog/sheep/coyote metaphor as that is more accurate and everyone is happy again
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    send a copy of that to moscow.

    oops did not carry the link over with it.

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    imperialism2024 wrote:
    I used to think of myself as a bear, until I discovered this meaning of the word... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bear_community :shock:
    ok here is the link to send to moscow.

  13. #13
    Regular Member XD40coyote's Avatar
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    So I guess since I am a Coyote I am evil LOL

    But some coyotes like to eat feral cats and never touch the sheep...lol

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    XD40coyote wrote:
    So I guess since I am a Coyote I am evil LOL

    But some coyotes like to eat feral cats and never touch the sheep...lol
    Sweeeeeet.....

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