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Thread: all type of bullets

  1. #1
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    anyone have a site for mesuarsing grains for all bullet types im new at reloading and have heard there's books out there but cant find themin any of my local book stores is there a good site for me to look at for this info.

    all help will be greatful

    thanks

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    mariaandefrem wrote:
    anyone have a site for mesuarsing grains for all bullet types im new at reloading and have heard there's books out there but cant find themin any of my local book stores is there a good site for me to look at for this info.

    all help will be greatful

    thanks
    I am not sure exactly what you are asking, are you asking for reloading data, ie how much powder goes with a particular bullet type? If so, lyman and speer both make excellent reloading manuals which you can get at local gun stores, or off tonnes of sites on the internet.

    I reload 38, 45 ACP, and 45-70, so if you need any specific advice about any of those calibers, I would be happy to help you.

    A good reloading manual is absolutely essential, so, I would highly recommend that you get one to learn more about the process, and get some safe recipies.

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    dixiehacker wrote:
    mariaandefrem wrote:
    anyone have a site for mesuarsing grains for all bullet types im new at reloading and have heard there's books out there but cant find themin any of my local book stores is there a good site for me to look at for this info.

    all help will be greatful

    thanks
    I am not sure exactly what you are asking, are you asking for reloading data, ie how much powder goes with a particular bullet type? If so, lyman and speer both make excellent reloading manuals which you can get at local gun stores, or off tonnes of sites on the internet.

    I reload 38, 45 ACP, and 45-70, so if you need any specific advice about any of those calibers, I would be happy to help you.

    A good reloading manual is absolutely essential, so, I would highly recommend that you get one to learn more about the process, and get some safe recipies.

    +1 on the Speer manual.
    I reload 38/357,45LC,45ACP,30/30,45/70,30/06,223,44Mag/spl 12 and 20 ga and a few others. Feel free to ask and be careful getting load data off the net.

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    thanks for the help i heard about speers and i'll look at my local gun store for the manual.

    thanks:celebrate

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    Here's what I like to use as I'm pretty much stuck on Titegroup for handguns and Varget for my 308.

    http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Every time I read one of these threads I feel the itch to start reloading. Once my fiancee and I get everything settled I may be asking you guys for some advice.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    mariaandefrem wrote:
    anyone have a site for mesuarsing grains for all bullet types im new at reloading and have heard there's books out there but cant find themin any of my local book stores is there a good site for me to look at for this info.

    all help will be greatful

    thanks
    In the interest of saving you from losing an appendage, I have the following advice. There is a man named Jerry that works the range at Superior Arms in Virginia Beach on Virginia Beach Blvd between Witchduck and Independence. He has been reloading for at least two decades. He also occasionally runs an NRA Reloading Course at the range. If you want to get into reloading, I suggest you call Superior to find out when he is working and then go talk to him some time while he is there.

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    On a side note, you aren't likely to find anything about reloading at any book stores in Hampton Roads. You might find one at some of the gun stores around here, but Amazon is your best bet for that.

    I would also suggest you look at www.dillonprecision.com for supplies and your press. They have some of the best, if not the best, customer service.

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    deepdiver wrote:
    Every time I read one of these threads I feel the itch to start reloading. Once my fiancee and I get everything settled I may be asking you guys for some advice.
    ARFCOM has some pretty good tutorials on where to go, what books to read and all to get started http://www.ar15.com/forums/forum.html?b=1&f=9

    The ABC's of reloading and Speers data guides are must haves.

    If you plan to start shooting more, reloading is a must. I would like to start hitting the range at least once a week, so i need to get into it. Consider a case of 223 now, quality is ~$0.40 a round. You start pressing your own and you can get ~$0.18 a round.

    You spend $500-600 on a good setup and 3000 round later it is paid for.



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    deepdiver wrote:
    Every time I read one of these threads I feel the itch to start reloading. Once my fiancee and I get everything settled I may be asking you guys for some advice.
    Same here, but I am lucky enought to be able to get into it for next to nothing. My dad has enough reloading equipment that he can give me his old (but still functional) equipment, and still have enough to reload for himself. So now I just need a place to put it.

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    do what i did go to homedepo and get a 15$ saw beanch it works great



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    FogRider wrote:
    deepdiver wrote:
    Every time I read one of these threads I feel the itch to start reloading. Once my fiancee and I get everything settled I may be asking you guys for some advice.
    Same here, but I am lucky enought to be able to get into it for next to nothing. My dad has enough reloading equipment that he can give me his old (but still functional) equipment, and still have enough to reload for himself. So now I just need a place to put it.
    I started loading in 65 and I think all the original equipment I started with is still functional. It's like everything else though...you keep upgrading and adding to. My favorite presses are still that first RCBS Rockchucker amd a masssive Herters C press.

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    peter nap wrote:
    I started loading in 65 and I think all the original equipment I started with is still functional. It's like everything else though...you keep upgrading and adding to. My favorite presses are still that first RCBS Rockchucker amd a masssive Herters C press.
    The stuff I'll be getting is all RCBS equipment older than me. A little slower than the multiple station rig my dad is keeping, but it still works. That's one of the nice things about reloading, and firearms in general: The technology doesn't really change much, it just gets faster.

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    FogRider wrote:
    peter nap wrote:
    I started loading in 65 and I think all the original equipment I started with is still functional. It's like everything else though...you keep upgrading and adding to. My favorite presses are still that first RCBS Rockchucker amd a masssive Herters C press.
    The stuff I'll be getting is all RCBS equipment older than me. A little slower than the multiple station rig my dad is keeping, but it still works. That's one of the nice things about reloading, and firearms in general: The technology doesn't really change much, it just gets faster.
    RCBS is hard to beat for a mainstay press. They are one of the few that are sturdy enough too swage with without loosening up. I have a Dillon that I use to crank out a lot of ammo in the shortest time but still go the RCBS for swaging, rifle cartridges and some of the hotter handgun loads.

    For precision rifle cartridge loads (long range stuff) I still use the Lee hand style loaders in an arbor press.

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    I do my loading on a Dillon 550, I can crank out 38's and 45's almost as fast as I can shoot them. I got the strong mount for the press, and since it has such a large base, I can set it on a table, and use C clamps to keep it attached, then take it down when I am done. For people who have limited space, this works great.

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    I use this and picked it up @ Bobs in Norfolk (~$25):

    Haven't reloaded handgun yet, but use Varget for .308 as well



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    Ok, that's it. Once we get the remodeling done on the house, I'm building the workbench as is already planned and looking for some used reloading equipment to get started. I still haven't purchased the 3 rifles I want so I'll be starting on .45 ACP and 9mm. I have been collecting my brass for about 6 months, separating it by caliber and bagging it up into 1000 rd bags just for when I started. I only have about 3k .45 and 2.5k 9mm but that is enough to get started.

    Heck, I learned how to rebuild car engines by reading books. I can't imagine this is more complicated. There will be a lot of "tricks" and "hints" to learn that won't be in the books, but I have always been good at learning and retaining from a good manual.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    deepdiver wrote:
    Ok, that's it. Once we get the remodeling done on the house, I'm building the workbench as is already planned and looking for some used reloading equipment to get started. I still haven't purchased the 3 rifles I want so I'll be starting on .45 ACP and 9mm. I have been collecting my brass for about 6 months, separating it by caliber and bagging it up into 1000 rd bags just for when I started. I only have about 3k .45 and 2.5k 9mm but that is enough to get started.

    Heck, I learned how to rebuild car engines by reading books. I can't imagine this is more complicated. There will be a lot of "tricks" and "hints" to learn that won't be in the books, but I have always been good at learning and retaining from a good manual.

    It's not hard at all Deepdiver. Go slow at first, use the published loads in the manual and stay organized. It's very hard to make a mistake if you follow those rules.

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Thanks!
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    peter nap wrote:
    deepdiver wrote:
    Ok, that's it. Once we get the remodeling done on the house, I'm building the workbench as is already planned and looking for some used reloading equipment to get started. I still haven't purchased the 3 rifles I want so I'll be starting on .45 ACP and 9mm. I have been collecting my brass for about 6 months, separating it by caliber and bagging it up into 1000 rd bags just for when I started. I only have about 3k .45 and 2.5k 9mm but that is enough to get started.

    Heck, I learned how to rebuild car engines by reading books. I can't imagine this is more complicated. There will be a lot of "tricks" and "hints" to learn that won't be in the books, but I have always been good at learning and retaining from a good manual.

    It's not hard at all Deepdiver. Go slow at first, use the published loads in the manual and stay organized. It's very hard to make a mistake if you follow those rules.
    I agree. Also, see if someone local of you reloads and just watch the process. I wasn't sold on how easy it was until I saw it first hand.

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    deepdiver wrote:
    Ok, that's it. Once we get the remodeling done on the house, I'm building the workbench as is already planned and looking for some used reloading equipment to get started. I still haven't purchased the 3 rifles I want so I'll be starting on .45 ACP and 9mm. I have been collecting my brass for about 6 months, separating it by caliber and bagging it up into 1000 rd bags just for when I started. I only have about 3k .45 and 2.5k 9mm but that is enough to get started.

    Heck, I learned how to rebuild car engines by reading books. I can't imagine this is more complicated. There will be a lot of "tricks" and "hints" to learn that won't be in the books, but I have always been good at learning and retaining from a good manual.
    You don't need a dedicated workbench actually, depending on the press you use. I have a RL550B from Dillon Precision mounted to a stacked pair of pieces of plywood. When I want to make ammo, I just pull it out of the closet and clamp it down onto my desk. Granted, my desk is sturdy as hell.

    Based on what you have gathered for brass, I'd suggest that you start with the 9mm first. The thing I found with 9mm is that, at least with Blue Dot powder, it's impossible to get an overpressure condition with the round. If I put in the maximum load, it's actually impossible for me to press the round down far enough in to get under the required Minimum Overall Length for the round. Also, since the max load takes up so much space, it's also impossible to accidentally double load the cartridge without making a huge mess, and you'll see what you did the second you try to set the bullet in place. The same cannot necessarily be said for .45 cartridges.

  22. #22
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    vtme_grad98 wrote:
    deepdiver wrote:
    Ok, that's it. Once we get the remodeling done on the house, I'm building the workbench as is already planned and looking for some used reloading equipment to get started. I still haven't purchased the 3 rifles I want so I'll be starting on .45 ACP and 9mm. I have been collecting my brass for about 6 months, separating it by caliber and bagging it up into 1000 rd bags just for when I started. I only have about 3k .45 and 2.5k 9mm but that is enough to get started.

    Heck, I learned how to rebuild car engines by reading books. I can't imagine this is more complicated. There will be a lot of "tricks" and "hints" to learn that won't be in the books, but I have always been good at learning and retaining from a good manual.
    You don't need a dedicated workbench actually, depending on the press you use. I have a RL550B from Dillon Precision mounted to a stacked pair of pieces of plywood. When I want to make ammo, I just pull it out of the closet and clamp it down onto my desk. Granted, my desk is sturdy as hell.

    Based on what you have gathered for brass, I'd suggest that you start with the 9mm first. The thing I found with 9mm is that, at least with Blue Dot powder, it's impossible to get an overpressure condition with the round. If I put in the maximum load, it's actually impossible for me to press the round down far enough in to get under the required Minimum Overall Length for the round. Also, since the max load takes up so much space, it's also impossible to accidentally double load the cartridge without making a huge mess, and you'll see what you did the second you try to set the bullet in place. The same cannot necessarily be said for .45 cartridges.
    I have an old very sturdy computer desk I'm moving to the basement. Maybe that would work. Thanks for the advice re: starting with 9mm.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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