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Thread: Resident of state for qualifying permit

  1. #1
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    So why does Colorado (and a handful of others) require you to be a resident of a state qualified permit to be honored? Most other states don't do this. Is there a reason?



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    Ohio is the same way. Maybe they think that by getting another states license, the personis trying to route the system. Which I don't have any problem with, especially if you live in a state that doesn't have reciprocity agreements with many other states, or that your state will charge you a ton of fees just to get a permit to do something that should be free in the first place.

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    Regular Member Anubis's Avatar
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    Until 2007, CO accepted nonRez permits from reciprocal states. Both the governor's office and the legislature were taken over in 2007by Democrats;this residents-only law and a couple of other anti-gun lawswere passed by the anti-gun Democrats flexing their new muscle. Several others failed to pass in 2007, and couple more were defeated in 2008 too.

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    This discrimination based upon state citizenship should be challenged as a violation of the privileges and immunities clause of the federal constitution. A successful law suit would do more for national reciprocity than anything else. Colorado and South Carolina for example refuse to both accept certain CHPs, and refuse to allow applications to SC, based soley upon state citizenship.

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    Regular Member reefteach's Avatar
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    ron-357 wrote:
    Ohio is the same way.
    Ohio does NOT require a person to be a resident of the state in which they are licensed.

  6. #6
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    According to handgunlaws.us the following states have the requirement:

    CO, KS, FL, SC, WV, MI, NH

    It's a bummer. I'll be traveling to Boulder next week and I will have this strange feeling that someone will be out to get me....:shock:.



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    Regular Member Anubis's Avatar
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    Puddin99 wrote:
    It's a bummer. I'll be traveling to Boulder next week and I will have this strange feeling that someone will be out to get me....:shock:.
    Denwego and a couple of others have noted good experiences OCing in Boulder, in other threads of this subforum. You shouldn't have any LEO trouble, but of course you could get kicked out of some stores.


  8. #8
    Regular Member Anubis's Avatar
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    reefteach wrote:
    Ohio does NOT require a person to be a resident of the state in which they are licensed.
    Right. That's one of the reasons I got a FL permit.

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    Puddin99 wrote:
    According to handgunlaws.us the following states have the requirement:

    CO, KS, FL, SC, WV, MI, NH

    It's a bummer.¬* I'll be traveling to Boulder next week and I will have this strange feeling that someone will be out to get me....:shock:.

    ¬*
    Don't worry... Boulder and OCing is like Boulder and everything else: all bark and no bite. It's clear that most to all of the local PD hate the thought of people owning guns period, let alone even CCing with a permit, but due to a couple of bias-motivated lawsuit threats last fall, they've stopped playing the whole "state law doesn't apply to us because we're special" card and have gone about posting areas where OCing isn't allowed. I've been downtown on Pearl Street a few times since it's warmed up recently while OCing, and with a steady supplies of police on patrol along with yuppies of every stripe I've not had any issue at all.

    It's a shame it's next week you'll be around. My fiancée and I are getting married this Sunday and we'll be... preoccupied. And by that, I mean moving to Virginia four days after getting married Enjoy Boulder during your stay!

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    moving to Virginia four days after getting married
    You're spending your honeymoon in VA? I'm so sorry :P



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    You are correct - I was thinking of WV not OH - I live on the border (not actually the border since the Ohio river is the border) grew up in WV and now live in OH. Both in houses overlooking the river. I can actually see my old neighborhood. But I digress. Sometimes I get the laws confused since I have to know them both since I am in both states most every day. My problem is - If I get a CCL it must be an Ohio one since WV doesn't recognize unless it is from your home state. Either way - I don't look to get a CCL anytime soon since I cannot see paying to carry my gun. No thanks, I'll just OC!

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    Puddin99 wrote:
    So why does Colorado (and a handful of others) require you to be a resident of a state qualified permit to be honored? Most other states don't do this. Is there a reason?

    It doesn't. Colorado DOES require a COLORADO resident to have a COLORADO permit to have it honored. This, only since Colorado went "shall-issue".

    If you have lived in Colorado for more than 90 days and have (for example) a Florida permit, the - Colorado resident - cannot use their FL permit to carry concealed in Colorado.

    If you think about it, that's not really a problem. If you live in Colorado and want to carry concealed in Colorado, get a Colorado opermit.

    If you live in any other state and have a valid CCW permit, it is valid in Colorado IF that state is in the reciprical agreement.

  13. #13
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    I understand your point but not underling issue. So I'm an Oregon resident - CO does not accept an OR permit. But I qualify and have a Utah permit - which CO does honor, but since I'm not a resident of Utah, it's not valid. That's my point.

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    Puddin99 wrote:
    I understand your point but not underling issue. So I'm an Oregon resident - CO does not accept an OR permit. But I qualify and have a Utah permit - which CO does honor, but since I'm not a resident of Utah, it's not valid. That's my point.
    You are correct (and - sorry I missed your point) the statutes that applies is 18-12-213-Reciprocity, which says


    (1) A permit to carry a concealed handgun or a concealed weapon that is issued by a state that recognizes the validity of permits issued pursuant to this part 2 shall be valid in this state in all respects as a permit issued pursuant to this part 2 if the permit is issued to a person who is:
    (a) Twenty-one years of age or older; and
    (b) (I) A resident of the state that issued the permit, as demonstrated by the address stated on a valid picture identification that is issued by the state that issued the permit and is carried by the permit holder; or
    (II) A resident of Colorado for no more than ninety days, as determined by the date of issuance on a valid picture identification issued by Colorado and carried by the permit holder.
    (2) For purposes of this section, a "valid picture identification" means a driver's license or a state identification issued in lieu of a driver's license.

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