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Thread: Press-checks

  1. #1
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    How many of you press-check your weapon every day?

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    Mine are always loaded.

    If it is in a holster..... it is loaded.

    I press check only after the initial load after I clean my gun.

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    One of many Useless techniques taught!
    There are better ways to ensure you firearm is loaded.

    And, no I don't manually insert a round in the chamber.
    If you think like a Statist, act like one, or back some, you've given up on freedom and have gone over to the dark side.
    The easiest ex. but probably the most difficult to grasp for gun owners is that fool permission slip so many of you have, especially if you show it off with pride. You should recognize it as an embarrassment, an infringement, a travesty and an affront to a free person.


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    Agent19 wrote:
    One of many Useless techniques taught!
    There are better ways to ensure you firearm is loaded.

    And, no I don't manually insert a round in the chamber.
    I would not say it is useless.... If you are shooting and swapping mags or clearing a malfunction.... the press check does come in handy to be sure you are locked and loaded.

    I was told that you carry a single bullet in your pocket and manually load it. Are you saying that is not true??

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    I've only done a press-check when, while loading, the slide drops before I've hit the slide release. (To make certain it actually loaded a round. After the first few times I stopped - - I've become confident that if inserting the magazine firmly causes the slide to go forward then the slide has loaded the top round.)

    If my pistol is being stored, it's unloaded. If it's in the holster or readily to hand, then I've loaded it before stepping out the door and I know it won't mysteriously unload itself.


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    LEO 229 wrote:
    Mine are always loaded.

    If it is in a holster..... it is loaded.

    I press check only after the initial load after I clean my gun.


    From another board I frequent.

    Posted April 21, 2008 10:15 PM
    Pancho

    I carried a full size Kimber 1911 when I worked as a guard for the local armored car company. This was also my bedside gun. Weapon was always loaded, unless I'm doing dry fire practice with it.

    At this time, I lived with, slept with my girlfriend, who was getting her first bit of weapons training under my tutelage.

    One day, I'm in the truck, pull my weapon out of its Safariland holster, and "press check" it. No reason, the weight felt right, it was more just a nervous/bored habit, just a stupid habit. Full magazine. Empty chamber.

    After I went to sleep every night, girlfriend would clear the weapon, then reinsert the magazine, because she was nervous about a having a gun that was "ready to go off."

    Check your weapons, often!


    ---

    I also quite often see people (sometimes LEO's too) leave the range with an empty weapon.

    I read another where a guy had not cleaned his gun properly in a while. Well, he decided it was time. He dropped the mag and tried to rack the slide, only it didin't... it was fused shut because his ex-girlfriend filled it full of super glue because she was mad at him. unknowingly he carried a $500 paper weight for roughly 3 months.

    Still think its useless? These are true stories and great examples as to why you should press-check often.

    It only takes a second.

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    Fallschirmjäger wrote:
    I've only done a press-check when, while loading, the slide drops before I've hit the slide release. (To make certain it actually loaded a round. After the first few times I stopped - - I've become confident that if inserting the magazine firmly causes the slide to go forward then the slide has loaded the top round.)

    If my pistol is being stored, it's unloaded. If it's in the holster or readily to hand, then I've loaded it before stepping out the door and I know it won't mysteriously unload itself.
    One more thing: Do you owna Sig pistol? Because if you don't, you have a slide STOP, not a slide release. This is a common misconception.

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    Still think its useless?
    Yep!!!!

    Where, didanyone saythey didn't checktheir weapons to see if they wouldfunction properly.

    [line]
    The press check will always be useless and dangerousin my opinion.

    Most modern firearms have a loaded chamber indicator.
    The press check only tells you thata round is chambered, it doesn't/can't let you know your firearm will work.

    [line]
    3 months without shooting his carry gun, says it all.
    Shooting is perishable skill, use it or lose it.
    Not educating his GF, stupid.

    [line]
    My carry gun isn't my go to gun when things go bump in the night.
    If you think like a Statist, act like one, or back some, you've given up on freedom and have gone over to the dark side.
    The easiest ex. but probably the most difficult to grasp for gun owners is that fool permission slip so many of you have, especially if you show it off with pride. You should recognize it as an embarrassment, an infringement, a travesty and an affront to a free person.


    ~Alan Korwin

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    No need, I have an LCI - Loaded Chamber Indicator. Always loaded except when cleaning.

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    Bravo_Sierra wrote:
    How many of you press-check your weapon every day?
    If not you can ALWAYS follow the example of TRAINED PROFESSIONALS , and clear it , like Police Chiefs and DEA agents who are the ONLY ONES:what:trained enough to hand a gun.

    I crack myself up. ROTFLMAO:celebrate. Just couldn't help myself.



    TJ

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    BobCav wrote:
    No need, I have an LCI - Loaded Chamber Indicator. Always loaded except when cleaning.
    Well, I'm a Glock guy so I don't have that. Guess I'd rather take half a second every morning to manually check instead of racking the slide if I get in a gunfight.

    O well.

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    Bravo_Sierra wrote:
    LCI - Loaded Chamber Indicator.
    snip.
    Well, I'm a Glock guy so I don't have that.
    snip.
    QFT.









    GLOCK ADVANTAGE, pg 9
    LOADED CHAMBER INDICATOR
    The user has always been able to read important parameters off his GLOCK pistol at a glance.
    Trigger forward = safety activated.
    Trigger pulled = safety deactivated.
    The pistol also shows the user whether a cartridge is in the barrel or not. The extractor also serve as a loaded chamber indicator on all GLOCK pistols – and this entirely without additional components. Visual and palpable extractor edge.
    Figure top = unloaded.
    Figure bottom = loaded



    If you think like a Statist, act like one, or back some, you've given up on freedom and have gone over to the dark side.
    The easiest ex. but probably the most difficult to grasp for gun owners is that fool permission slip so many of you have, especially if you show it off with pride. You should recognize it as an embarrassment, an infringement, a travesty and an affront to a free person.


    ~Alan Korwin

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    Bravo_Sierra wrote:
    BobCav wrote:
    No need, I have an LCI - Loaded Chamber Indicator. Always loaded except when cleaning.
    Well, I'm a Glock guy so I don't have that. Guess I'd rather take half a second every morning to manually check instead of racking the slide if I get in a gunfight.

    O well.
    Ah. I guess that's what makes it an individual preference. My Ruger P345's is large enough not to miss seeing or feeling and right in the line of sight.It's just me and the wife andshe won't even touch it, let alone have a clue how to clear it and wouldn't even if she knew how. Sounless some unseen and unheard evilmagical forcedecides to empty it or fuse it shut beside me while I'm sleeping, it's just not gonna happen.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    UTOC-45-44 wrote:
    Bravo_Sierra wrote:
    How many of you press-check your weapon every day?
    If not you can ALWAYS follow the example of TRAINED PROFESSIONALS , and clear it , like Police Chiefs and DEA agents who are the ONLY ONES:what:trained enough to hand a gun.

    I crack myself up. ROTFLMAO:celebrate. Just couldn't help myself.



    TJ
    Cant' forget deputies that accidentally fire 7 rounds (yes, I said SEVEN) one of which hit his wife in the stomach, while conducting a "press-check":

    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?n...7468&rfi=6



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    Thanks for bringing the inherit dangers of the press check to the fore front.

    It pays to befamiliar with your firearm of choice.
    If you think like a Statist, act like one, or back some, you've given up on freedom and have gone over to the dark side.
    The easiest ex. but probably the most difficult to grasp for gun owners is that fool permission slip so many of you have, especially if you show it off with pride. You should recognize it as an embarrassment, an infringement, a travesty and an affront to a free person.


    ~Alan Korwin

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    BobCav wrote:
    UTOC-45-44 wrote:
    Bravo_Sierra wrote:
    How many of you press-check your weapon every day?
    If not you can ALWAYS follow the example of TRAINED PROFESSIONALS , and clear it , like Police Chiefs and DEA agents who are the ONLY ONES:what:trained enough to hand a gun.

    I crack myself up. ROTFLMAO:celebrate. Just couldn't help myself.



    TJ
    Cant' forget deputies that accidentally fire 7 rounds (yes, I said SEVEN) one of which hit his wife in the stomach, while conducting a "press-check":

    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?n...7468&rfi=6

    :what::what::what::what::what::what:A WHOLE mag. OMG:what::what::what::what::what::what:

    I hope she recovers soon.

    TJ

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    Wait, couldn't that now be considered a "machine gun"? Why isn't he being prosecuted ala David Olofson? A malfunction is a malfunction is a malfunction! WTF?

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    BobCav wrote:
    Cant' forget deputies that accidentally fire 7 rounds (yes, I said SEVEN) one of which hit his wife in the stomach, while conducting a "press-check":

    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?n...7468&rfi=6

    Was he press checking a Glock 18?


    [flash=320,256]http://www.youtube.com/v/kBjUDCyDCuI&hl[/flash]

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    BobCav wrote:
    Cant' forget deputies that accidentally fire 7 rounds (yes, I said SEVEN) one of which hit his wife in the stomach, while conducting a "press-check":

    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?n...7468&rfi=6

    What is: The handgun, which is similar to a .380-caliber, was being carried by Bowyer. :what:

    Was it a Glock 18? Inquiring minds want to know.

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    PT111 wrote:
    What is: The handgun, which is similar to a .380-caliber, was being carried by Bowyer. :what:

    Was it a Glock 18? Inquiring minds want to know.
    Glock 18: Selective-fire variant of the Glock 17, developed at the request of the Austrian counter-terrorist unit EKO Cobra. The Glock 18 is not available to the civilian market. This machine pistol-class firearm has a lever-type fire-control selector switch, installed on the left side of the slide, in the rear, serrated portion (selector lever in the in the bottom position – continuous fire, top setting – single fire). The firearm is typically used with an extended 33-round capacity magazine. Early Glock 18’s were ported to reduce muzzle rise during automatic fire. Another compensated variant was also produced, known as the Glock 18C. It has a keyhole opening cut into the forward portion of the slide, not unlike the opening on the Glock long-slide models, although the G18 has a standard-length slide. The keyhole opening provides a venting area to allow the four, progressively-larger (from back to front) compensator cuts machined into the barrel to accomplish their job, which is to afford more control over the rapid-firing machine pistol. The compensator cuts, of varying widths start about halfway back on the top. The rear two cuts are narrow, while the front two cuts are wider. The slide is also hollowed, or dished-out in a rectangular pattern between the rear of the ejection port and the rear sight. The pistol’s rate of fire in fully automatic mode is approx. 1100-1200 rounds/min. Most of the other characteristics are similar to the Glock 17.

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    BobCav wrote:
    No need, I have an LCI - Loaded Chamber Indicator. Always loaded except when cleaning.
    Mechanical devices can fail. The loaded chamber indicator can break and not show when the chamber is loaded, or, more likely, it can stick or jam and show loaded when it isn't.The only way to KNOW there is or is not a cartridge in the chamber is to open and lock the slide, eject the mag, and inspect the chamber visually and by feel.

    You are right in that the chances of a loaded chamber indicator showing not loaded when in fact it is are a rounding error; it is FAR more likely that the indicator will show loaded for some reason when it is not,including a jam or an FTC leaving empty brass in the chamber.

    I do not do press checks on my 9mm. It's a TDA that can only be safed when hammer-down, and pulling the slide enough to separate the barrel requires more force than any other point in the slide's travel so if I'm not extremely careful a press-check generally ends up racking the slide. I do have a visual cue; the gun's design and tolerances are such that there is a small gap between the chamber and breechblock. I can look through that gap and see that there is a brass or silver casing in the gun, or that there is no casing.

    My .22 on the other hand is a hammerless SAO (Buckmark). If the gun is cocked, it is easy to pull the slide back enough for visual confirmation, without ejecting or chambering. If the gun is not cocked, I can pull the trigger all I want; the gun will not fire, and I must rack the slide to cock it. I also have the gun cocked whether or not the chamber is hot or a mag is in place. So, a press-check is actually pretty much required with that gun.

  23. #23
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    PT111 wrote:
    BobCav wrote:
    Cant' forget deputies that accidentally fire 7 rounds (yes, I said SEVEN) one of which hit his wife in the stomach, while conducting a "press-check":

    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?n...7468&rfi=6

    What is: The handgun, which is similar to a .380-caliber, was being carried by Bowyer. :what:

    Was it a Glock 18? Inquiring minds want to know.
    Haven't found that yet. A few people have speculated that with that few rounds in the magazine it sounds like a Makarov thatare known to get stuck firing pins when not properly cleaned.

    http://xavierthoughts.blogspot.com/2...oots-wife.html

    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=138885

    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=145094




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    Liko81 wrote:
    BobCav wrote:
    No need, I have an LCI - Loaded Chamber Indicator. Always loaded except when cleaning.
    Mechanical devices can fail. The loaded chamber indicator can break and not show when the chamber is loaded, or, more likely, it can stick or jam and show loaded when it isn't.The only way to KNOW there is or is not a cartridge in the chamber is to open and lock the slide, eject the mag, and inspect the chamber visually and by feel.

    You are right in that the chances of a loaded chamber indicator showing not loaded when in fact it is are a rounding error; it is FAR more likely that the indicator will show loaded for some reason when it is not,including a jam or an FTC leaving empty brass in the chamber.

    I do not do press checks on my 9mm. It's a TDA that can only be safed when hammer-down, and pulling the slide enough to separate the barrel requires more force than any other point in the slide's travel so if I'm not extremely careful a press-check generally ends up racking the slide. I do have a visual cue; the gun's design and tolerances are such that there is a small gap between the chamber and breechblock. I can look through that gap and see that there is a brass or silver casing in the gun, or that there is no casing.

    My .22 on the other hand is a hammerless SAO (Buckmark). If the gun is cocked, it is easy to pull the slide back enough for visual confirmation, without ejecting or chambering. If the gun is not cocked, I can pull the trigger all I want; the gun will not fire, and I must rack the slide to cock it. I also have the gun cocked whether or not the chamber is hot or a mag is in place. So, a press-check is actually pretty much required with that gun.
    I hear ya, but I think the chances of the LCI failing are slim and if it did, I'd catch it becauseI clean and cycle itwhen I"TICL" my gun. Teardown, Inspect, Clean and Lube.

    The othe failures you mentioned would be during firing when the LCI is pretty useless anyway. Some Ruger P345's have gunked up LCI's that remain stick in the up "Loaded" position, but the design won't affect firing at all.

    So if it fails up and is basically useless, you would rightly assume the gun was loaded as you should always do anyway. If I cleared it and the indicator stayed up, I'd know something was amiss and it was cleaning time anyway.

    Bottom line - know your gun!



  25. #25
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    I don't think you guys understand what a propper press-check is. I don't mean to press the f-ing trigger...

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