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Thread: Just Opened the Paper This Morning!!!!!!

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    Regular Member CRF250rider1000's Avatar
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    Well here is the article I clipped out Right at the top of the front page of the Washington Post!!!!!!!!!!!


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    It is sad but I understand the article.

    Back in the day we used to fist fight if we had a problem or heated argument.

    But today we have video games and movies that sensationalize the shooting of other people so we kinda see this as the "norm" in society.

    Someone who gets all worked up and has a gun handy could always go use it to settle his argument or make his final point.

    Most gun owners and those that lawfully carry are good people why make wise and informed decisions. But since anyone can carry a gun in so many states.... this means that bad people or people that are not so wise or even mature can also carry.

    Just like in all groups of people.... there are a few gun owners who do dumb stuff and it makes the entire group look bad.

    I have learned over the years that not all of a group thinks the same way.

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    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...051002688.html

    Tron S. Johnson and Terrance L. Sneed were the same age, grew up in the same neighborhood, attended the same high school and, police said, became crime statistics on opposite sides of the same handgun after a fight at a pizza restaurant one night.
    Sneed is dead. Johnson, 22, is in the Prince George's County jail, accused of killing him and two of Sneed's friends that night.
    Johnson, a slight man who was training to be a barber, by all accounts did little to provoke the Feb. 3 fight. But when trash talk during the Super Bowl turned to fisticuffs, police said, he pulled a handgun from his jacket and fired at his attackers in the restaurant.
    The triple slaying is part of a trend that county law enforcement officials call "wear and carry" killings: callous acts committed on little provocation, often in public settings by young men who carry guns as casually as they do pocket change.
    The crimes are called wear-and-carry killings based on the statute outlining the penalties for wearing and carrying a weapon, authorities said.
    Police statistics show that 1,739 guns were confiscated from suspects in the county last year, 407 more than five years ago. Most of the illegal-gun charges filed involve men ages 18 to 24, said county State's Attorney Glenn F. Ivey.
    "Some of the guys, if they are drug dealers . . . feel like they have to have a gun to protect themselves and their quote-unquote business transactions," Ivey said. "But there is a growing number who carry because there are no consequences. Some feel it is a status thing. Some say it's for protection."
    A friend of Johnson's put it more simply: "If anybody ever tried to hurt me, I would shoot them. I'd rather be in prison than dead."
    Most homicide victims in Prince George's are ages 18 to 24, as well. Of the 1,141 homicides from 1998 to 2007, 90 percent of the victims were black men, officials said, and 75 percent of those were in that age range.
    National crime statistics also reflect that young black men are victims and suspects in homicides more than any other demographic group.
    In December, Antonio Lonelle McGhee, 20, of the District was convicted of fatally shooting a 24-year-old Capitol Heights man who refused to give him a cigarette while standing in line at a restaurant. In February 2007, Ramsey N. "Ham" Bush, 24, of Oxon Hill was convicted of fatally shooting a 23-year-old friend who owed him $25. After the shooting, Bush took the money from the dying man's pocket.
    "Everybody's got a gun," said Joseph J. Vince Jr., former chief of the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives crime gun analysis branch. "Instead of getting upset and fighting or beating each other up, they're shooting each other."

    Johnson came with his gun to the Uno Chicago Grill in Largo on Feb. 3, police said. He was there for the Super Bowl, not to fight, he said through his attorney Stephen Gensemer.
    That night, dozens of people milled about the pizzeria at the Boulevard at the Capital Centre as they took in the game. The restaurant drew a lot of young men from the neighborhood.
    There was Johnson, a Mitchellville resident who had grown up in the Landover area and graduated from Charles Herbert Flowers High School. He had had a few brushes with the law but no violent offenses, court records show. He had recently started barber school and dreamed of opening a chain of shops, his attorney said.
    There also was Sneed, a Flowers dropout looking for a job and trying to find ways to spend more time with his 3-year-old daughter, said Sandra Sneed, his mother. That afternoon, he had stopped by his mother's apartment. He had told her he planned to go to Uno for the game. The Landover resident arrived at the restaurant with two friends: Charles D. Harrison, 25, of Landover and Curtis L. Poston, 26, of Temple Hills.
    At some point, witnesses said, Poston began throwing barbs at Johnson.
    "He tried ignoring them," Gensemer said of his client. "He tried reasoning with them. He tried joking around with them. He tried just verbally saying, 'Stop. Get away. Knock it off.' "
    By the game's fourth quarter, witnesses said, Poston was taunting Johnson more aggressively.
    At one point, Poston approached Johnson's table, with Sneed and Harrison in tow. There was an argument, then a fight. Tables were upended. Glasses and plates flew. As the brawl escalated, Johnson reached into his jacket. Shots rang out, sending screaming patrons running for the door; Poston and Sneed fell in the bar, witnesses said. Harrison bolted for the exit, but Johnson followed and shot him in the parking lot, authorities and witnesses said.
    In a written statement released by his attorney, Johnson did not say whether he had a gun or whether he fired one.
    "He verified accounts that he was not the one to throw the first punch and that it was members of the other group that initiated the fight," Gensemer said, referring to Johnson's statement to The Washington Post.
    Johnson's friend said Johnson never would have fired if he hadn't felt threatened. "They jumped Tron, basically," he said. "That's when Tron pulled out the gun."
    The friend, 21, admitted to a reporter that he was armed. "I'm telling you now, I would have done the same thing," said the man, who declined to be named for fear of retaliation. "There are people out here who want to hurt you. I carry a gun for that very reason."

    The prevalence of guns in young hands takes away the opportunity for reason to prevail in such confrontations, said Vernon R. Herron, public safety director for Prince George's.
    "All of these killings that we are seeing are just senseless acts," he said. "There hasn't been a homicide recently on the streets of Prince George's County that could not have been prevented if the perpetrator had just thought through what they were doing."
    Former D.C. police chief Isaac Fulwood Jr., a member of the U.S. Parole Commission, said the "thug culture" portrayed in some music, music videos and movies has fanned interest in carrying guns. "And now with this thug mentality, we're seeing all these young people being killed by other young people, for nothing," he said.
    Court records show that some of those involved in the Uno killings had been mixed up with guns before. Poston served no jail time after pleading guilty in 2004 to illegal possession of a handgun after he threatened to shoot men he had argued with over a football game in a Bowie park. Sneed served three days after pleading guilty to a handgun violation in 2003. Johnson, who was arrested three times on marijuana charges last year, was at a Landover rooming house where police conducting a raid found an illegal handgun in April 2007. He was not charged because authorities could not determine whether the gun was his.
    Authorities said the number of youths carrying guns has increased because of lax penalties. Laws meant to curtail gun possession "have been watered down" to the point that they are rendered ineffective, said Vince, the former ATF agent who is a partner in Crime Gun Solutions, a Frederick-based company that collects and interprets gun-crimes data.
    Because many of the gun cases are first offenses, officials said, they are often not prosecuted. When they are, judges are hesitant to impose stiff penalties, even as the number of young people caught with firearms increases, officials said.
    "These guys do a cost-analysis thing," Ivey said. "And if the price of getting caught with a gun is relatively low -- they are not looking at any kind of jail sentence -- their concerns about getting caught can be outweighed by what they think are the benefits of carrying: sometimes to commit crimes, sometimes for status, sometimes for peer pressure."
    To reduce gun crimes, some communities such as the District have instituted gun buyback programs, in which owners are paid to turn over guns. Prince George's, Baltimore and Richmond have handed over repeat gun offenders to federal court, where they often receive stiffer sentences and out-of-state prison time. Ivey asked judges last year to order a mandatory one-year jail sentence for anyone convicted of illegal possession of a handgun, even first-time offenders.
    Herron said the answer is not only to impose strict penalties but also to encourage the community to turn in offenders. Fulwood said parents, too, need to be involved.
    "If my son has a gun and he's living in my house, at some point I should know because I should be looking around," he said. "I guarantee you if the kids have guns, they have them in their homes."
    Sandra Sneed said she does not think her son was involved with guns. Even as she mourned him, she bemoaned the gun violence that is taking so many young black men's lives.
    "They were both so young," she said of her son and Johnson. "What could happen that would lead somebody to do this? Nothing could have been that bad."
    Staff researchers Rena Kirsch and Meg Smith contributed to this report.


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    LEO 229 wrote:
    Just like in all groups of people.... there are a few gun owners who do dumb stuff and it makes the entire group look bad.

    I have learned over the years that not all of a group thinks the same way.
    There are some American citizens that 'do dumb stuff' that makes all of us look bad.

    Either we are equal or we are not. Good people ought to be armed where they will, with wits and guns and the truth. NRA *******

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    Where is this "trend" that they speak of? I'd really like to see the numbers, otherwise this sounds like a whole lot of sensationalizing. :?

    EDIT: Ok so while I was typing, Doug posted the whole article, and I'm not surprised nor convinced....
    Most homicide victims in Prince George's are ages 18 to 24, as well. Of the 1,141 homicides from 1998 to 2007, 90 percent of the victims were black men, officials said, and 75 percent of those were in that age range.
    These statistics seem a lot more overwhelming than any of the gun related ones.

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    Regular Member CRF250rider1000's Avatar
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    Yea my dad opens the paper and tosses it to me for me to read. Then I have both of my parents telling me how it's a bad idea for me to carry because stuff like that could happen since I am a 19 year old carrying The people in that article are idiots IMO. I explained to my parents that when carrying a gun you need to have a level head at all times and if you get into an argument, just walk away. Carrying a gun is a big responsibility and should only be combined with a level head.
    Also you should NEVER pull a gun on someone unless your life is in immediate danger.

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    Stupid people doing stupid ****.

    Stop the presses.

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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    CRF250rider1000 wrote:
    Yea my dad opens the paper and tosses it to me for me to read. Then I have both of my parents telling me how it's a bad idea for me to carry because stuff like that could happen since I am a 19 year old carrying The people in that article are idiots IMO. I explained to my parents that when carrying a gun you need to have a level head at all times and if you get into an argument, just walk away. Carrying a gun is a big responsibility and should only be combined with a level head.
    Also you should NEVER pull a gun on someone unless your life is in immediate danger.
    Ask your mom & dad what they would suggest you do if you were not to carry and bad guys pulled down on you - stop, ask for a few minutes of truce and call 911?
    They are asking you to be a defenseless victim and suggesting that by legally exercising your right you are adding to the "problem."

    How would your parents respond or want you to respond to a home invasion?
    There comes a time when we must respond and to do that we must be prepared.

    We hold memorial services for people that we cannot bring back to life because they would not or could not defend themselves - sad.

    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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    Tell your parents that these individuals already had shady pasts. The shooter had drug charges so he wasn't even allowed to have a pistol, let alone conceal carry one. Are your parents comparing these criminals to you? If so, ask them why they think you would act that way?

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    "Everybody's got a gun," said Joseph J. Vince Jr., former chief of the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives crime gun analysis branch.

    Really? I believe the word 'everybody' may be misused here...When I'm out eating dinner with the family, going to a movie, or shopping...I don't have a gun. I believe the 'everybody' he is referring to is that group of individuals who don't care if they're breaking the law in the first place. GOTTA love the People's Republic of Freaking Maryland.

    Virginia...one day...one day...

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    Regular Member TechnoWeenie's Avatar
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    LEO 229 wrote:
    (snip)
    Most gun owners and those that lawfully carry are good people why make wise and informed decisions. But since anyone can carry a gun in so many states....* this means that bad people or people that are not so wise or even mature can also carry.
    (emphasis mine)

    This is a state that for all intents and purposes DOES NOT issue carry permits, you should know, you're just across the river .

    These guns are being carried by thugs, illegally. It has NOTHING to do with proper gun ownership, responsibility, etc. It has EVERYTHING to do with POS excuses for human beings killing people over BS.

    I moved out of MD to WA, I'm oh so glad I did.

    I'm gonna bet the gun wasn't registered, was carried illegally, was used in a felony, and assisted a murder.

    That's 2 misdemeanors and 2 felonies, as I count it. When the F#)^ is the legislature gonna realize that these thugs couldn't give a rats ass about laws, and let RESPONSIBLE GUN OWNERS carry to defend themselves?
    Evangelical lessons are provided upon request. Anyone wishing to meet Jesus can just kick in my door.

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    TechnoWeenie wrote:
    I moved out of MD to WA, I'm oh so glad I did.
    Shhh!!!! No sense in letting other people know that Washington has common sense (for the most part) gun laws and shall issue permits with no training required. After spending two years in SoCal and then coming home, I can just begin to imagine how you felt moving to Washington!

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