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Thread: Report from Chesapeake:

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    It just keeps getting uglier for the PD.

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    Report from Chesapeake: Possible Second Informant Emerges in Ryan Frederick Case Friday, June 13th, 2008 Twenty-eight-year-old Ryan Frederick currently sits in a jail in Chesapeake, Viginia for killing Det. Jarrod Shivers during a drug raid on Frederick’s home. He had no criminal record, and just a misdemeanor amount of marijuana in his home. He also says someone broke into his home three nights before the raid. He’s being charged with capital murder and felony manufacture of marijuana.
    The raid was conducted based solely on the word of a confidential informant. Police made no attempt to buy drugs from Frederick. A couple of weeks ago, local TV station WTKR identified the police informant in the case, a 20-year-old man named Steven who had several charges pending against him at the time of the raid, was dating the sister of Frederick’s fiance, and had a standing grudge with Frederick. The station reported that Frederick and his friends and family believe Steven was the one who broke into Frederick’s home the same week of the raid.
    Last week I received a tip that there may have been a second man involved in the break-in at Ryan Frederick’s house. My source has spoken to the man a few times over the last few months, and says the man has confirmed not only that he and Steven together broke into Frederick’s house at the behest of the police, but that the two had been working as paid police informants for months—and had actually broken into several houses around Chesapeake, all with the blessing of Chesapeake police officers.
    The second man is currently in the Chesapeake City jail. I don’t see any point in revealing his identity right now, so I’ll just call him "Reggie." I called the jail and arranged an interview with Reggie set for last Saturday afternoon. The jail checked with Reggie, who then asked what the interview would be about. I mentioned Steven’s name, and Reggie agreed to the interview.
    Reggie initially was reluctant to talk to me (more on that later). Between the time I arranged the interview and the time I drove to Chesapeake to speak with him, his attorney had instructed him not to talk to me at all. I asked if he’d be more willing to talk if I didn’t use his name. He responded that he’s not worried about retaliation for being a snitch, he’s worried about retaliation from the police.
    Still, after a few minutes, he did begin to corroborate some of the things my source told me.
    Reggie told me he knows Steven "from the streets." He confirmed that the two had been working as paid police informants for several months. The police would pay them to find stashes of drugs or evidence of burglaries. I asked Reggie if the police ever encouraged him to actually break into a home to look for information, as he had told my source. Reggie hesitated, then declined to say. "I don’t want to get into any more trouble," he said.
    I then mentioned my source, and asked if Reggie he had spoken with him. He said "yes." I asked if what he told my source was true. He again said "yes," but added that he was scared, and "that’s not something I can get into right now. I just want to do my time and go home."
    Because they were regularly working with the police, the two men seem to have started to think they were above the law. Last January, just a few days before the Ryan Frederick raid, Steven was arrested and charged with credit card fraud and grand larceny for some credit cards police say he stole last December.
    Reggie told me Steven contacted him shortly after that arrest, and told him about the charges. He says Steven told him he had worked out a deal with the police where they’d help him with the credit card charges if he could bring back evidence that Ryan Frederick was growing marijuana.
    Reggie says he and Steven then broke into Frederick’s detached garage to obtain evidence against Frederick. Once again, I asked if the police knew about the break-in. Reggie again refused to answer, and again explained that he was afraid of possible retaliation from the police.
    Reggie said he’s personally never met Frederick, and that the break-in at Frederick’s house all went through Steven. He said he saw television reports of the raid later that week, and immediately knew it was the same house he and Steven had broken into days earlier.
    Reggie was arrested a few weeks later on February 12 on a burglary charge he says was trumped up.
    Reggie has a long record. In May 2007 he pleaded guilty to burglary, grand larceny, and breaking and entering. He served six months of a three-year sentence on those charges, with the rest suspended. He was released in August. In 2006 he was charged with burglary and arson of an occupied dwelling. Those charges were nolle prossed, meaning the prosecutor could refile them within the statute of limitations if he wished.
    But Reggie says the burglary charge on February 12 was concocted to keep him quiet about the Frederick raid. If what he told my source is true—that the police were encouraging informants to break into private residences to gather evidence—that’s pretty damning. It would amount to actual criminal conduct by members of the Chesapeake Police Department.
    Reggie explained to me last weekend that one reason he was reluctant to talk to me is that shortly after he spoke to my source earlier this year, the police added additional charges to rap sheet. He believes this too was retaliatory, and designed to keep him quiet. This, he said, is why he couldn’t be as forthcoming with me. He was denied bail on February 14th, and has been in the city jail ever since.
    A search of the Chesapeake General Court’s public records presents a time-line that supports Reggie’s story. He was arrested on February 12 on charges of burglary, grand larceny, and credit card larceny. He spoke to my source a few times over the next several weeks. On June 5, the police then added another grand larceny charge, and a charge of entering a house to commit assault and battery. At that point, Reggie stopped talking to my source.
    We also know that the credit card charges for which Steven was arrested in January were dropped in April. They were then reinstated in May, and Steven was indicted. On May 19 a warrant was issued for his arrest. I was able to get in touch with a friend of Steven’s, who made it rather clear that Steven isn’t interested in talking to journalists right now.
    So at the very least, here, we now have more confirmation that informants working for the police illegally broke into Ryan Frederick’s home three days before the drug raid. At worst, they may have done so with the consent of the police, this may not have been the first time they’ve done so, and the police may be intimidating the two men to prevent them from talking about it.
    Moreover, you also have the unfortunate scenario where two men who may be the most important witnesses in Ryan Frederick’s trial are facing a slew of charges of their own, and basically at the mercy of the very police department their testimony could implicate.
    Back in January, Chesapeake City Manager William Harrell hired an outside firm to conduct a top-to-bottom review of the city police department. So it seems clear that some officials in Chesapeake city government know there are problems. Given the circumstances of this case, though, and that a man’s life may be on the line, these latest allegations merit an outside investigation of Chesapeake PD, if not by Virginia Attorney General Bob McConnell, then by U.S. Attorney Chuck Rosenberg.
    Prior archive of Frederick posts here.

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    Regular Member Thundar's Avatar
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    Wow. I sure hope this isn't true, but it is plausible. It really is time for the Virginia State Police to conduct an independent investigation. I think it is beyond the Chesapeake PDs ability to police themselves. Even if they still have the ability to police themselves, their credibility is shot (no pun intended).

    Burglarspaid by the PD who break into homes, then give info to PD for warrants. What a nightmare for prosecutors and my city. If true, how many convictions will be set aside and how many Chesapeake PD detectives will become felons?

    If this case is as tainted as The Agitator's informant indicates, and the warrant is thrown out, what does that make the home assault, and the charges against Ryan Frederick?
    He wore his gun outside his pants for all the honest world to see. Pancho & Lefty

    The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us....There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! ...The war is inevitableand let it come! I repeat it, Sir, let it come . PATRICK HENRY speech 1776

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    I think the State Police should investigate but, he FBI should be involved to give Federal protection to the informant. If this proves true it will be a HUGE shake-up in local government, imagine how high this would have to go to get funded........

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    Sounds a little fishy.

    Why is he in jail when all he had to do was turn federal or states evidence against the Chesapeake PD, or just threaten to?

    I know some police aren't the brightest, but you'd have to be pretty dumb to put yourself in such a position that you can't then go after your informant when breaks the leash.

    I think I'll have to wait and see on this one.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

    There is no human being on earth I hate so much I would actually vote to inflict government upon him.

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    We will all just have to wait and see, but I bet this would all go away if they could get Ryan to plea bargain.

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    Getting the State Police to investigate another police agency and actually report if they did any thing wrong would be like having Obama's pastor do an objective study on affirmative action. How about instead of talking about here, we all get together and go to a Chesapeake city council meeting and ask for answers.

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    Citizen wrote:
    Why is he in jail when all he had to do was turn federal or states evidence against the Chesapeake PD, or just threaten to?

    I know some police aren't the brightest, but you'd have to be pretty dumb to put yourself in such a position that you can't then go after your informant when breaks the leash.
    Any immunity he might receive would only apply to what he was testifying about. His handlers at CPD likely have a thick file of charges against him, just waiting to drop on his head if he doesn't keep his mouth shut.

    Petty criminals expect to do petty jail time; it's simply job overhead. As an "outed" CI, you can bet he's terrified of a multi-year sentence in the state prison.


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    GLENGLOCKER wrote:
    Getting the State Police to investigate another police agency and actually report if they did any thing wrong would be like having Obama's pastor do an objective study on affirmative action. How about instead of talking about here, we all get together and go to a Chesapeake city council meeting and ask for answers.

    Not nessasarly, The State Police are very much above thedirty politics of locality's, much like the FBI in investigating civil rights violations by local governments in the 60's. The State Police and the FBI have both probably assigned a team to start the investigation into this botched raid. This whole thing wreaks a foul smell and we aren't the only ones noticing. All we need is for some official to invite an investigation (just like the Deputy in Surry who asked the feds to investigate Mike Vick, the Sheriff, and the local Prosecutor) from the Feds and they will be on it. I believe that most cops are good and go into this career to do good but some quickly learn to deal with sleaze by being sleazy. This thing about paying lowlifes to break into houses of suspected drug dealers is probably common practice and this time it looks like they might have been caught with their hands in the cookie jar. I say call the Feds, State Police and anyone else to expose this to the light of truth.

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    JeffersonDavis wrote:
    GLENGLOCKER wrote:
    Getting the State Police to investigate another police agency and actually report if they did any thing wrong would be like having Obama's pastor do an objective study on affirmative action. How about instead of talking about here, we all get together and go to a Chesapeake city council meeting and ask for answers.

    Not nessasarly, The State Police are very much above thedirty politics of locality's, much like the FBI in investigating civil rights violations by local governments in the 60's. The State Police and the FBI have both probably assigned a team to start the investigation into this botched raid. This whole thing wreaks a foul smell and we aren't the only ones noticing. All we need is for some official to invite an investigation (just like the Deputy in Surry who asked the feds to investigate Mike Vick, the Sheriff, and the local Prosecutor) from the Feds and they will be on it. I believe that most cops are good and go into this career to do good but some quickly learn to deal with sleaze by being sleazy. This thing about paying lowlifes to break into houses of suspected drug dealers is probably common practice and this time it looks like they might have been caught with their hands in the cookie jar. I say call the Feds, State Police and anyone else to expose this to the light of truth.
    I agree. The Virginia State Police have awell-known reputation for integrity, honesty and impartiality. They also have been good to gun owners, and have been quickly responsive to our concerns on multiple occasions. What do you have against them, GlennGlocker?

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    He probably doesn't have anything against them, just not much understanding of how they operate. He is on the right track though as far as questioning city council, someone needs to pursue this before it gets a chance to be swept under a rug.

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    It's a well known fact that leos don't go against there own no matter what. If the VA State Police are any different then great.

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    SicSemperTyrannis wrote:
    I agree. The Virginia State Police have awell-known reputation for integrity, honesty and impartiality. They also have been good to gun owners, and have been quickly responsive to our concerns on multiple occasions. What do you have against them, GlennGlocker?
    Are the VSP still good to gun owners?

    I find myself questioning that with the grandstanding positions of the former Superintendent of the State Police on the VT thing, who used to the tragedy to push for gun control totally unrelated to the incident.

    I know he is a FORMER superintendent, but I just chalked it up as part of the rising tide of police looking to restrict RTKBA. Would be nice if I am making a false assumption about the VSP.



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    Skeptic wrote:
    SicSemperTyrannis wrote:
    I agree. The Virginia State Police have awell-known reputation for integrity, honesty and impartiality. They also have been good to gun owners, and have been quickly responsive to our concerns on multiple occasions. What do you have against them, GlennGlocker?
    Are the VSP still good to gun owners?

    I find myself questioning that with the grandstanding positions of the former Superintendent of the State Police on the VT thing, who used to the tragedy to push for gun control totally unrelated to the incident.

    I know he is a FORMER superintendent, but I just chalked it up as part of the rising tide of police looking to restrict RTKBA. Would be nice if I am making a false assumption about the VSP.

    I find them honest and neutral about firearms, which is what we should really want. Never has a problem with them, and their web site is fairly accurate. Might ask LEO 229 as he is a class III owner and has had to deal withVSP in more depth about firearms.

    The former superintendent is a real piece of work who showed his true colors during the VT investigation.

    He wore his gun outside his pants for all the honest world to see. Pancho & Lefty

    The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us....There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! ...The war is inevitableand let it come! I repeat it, Sir, let it come . PATRICK HENRY speech 1776

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    Thundar wrote:
    Skeptic wrote:
    Are the VSP still good to gun owners?

    I find myself questioning that with the grandstanding positions of the former Superintendent of the State Police on the VT thing, who used to the tragedy to push for gun control totally unrelated to the incident.

    I know he is a FORMER superintendent, but I just chalked it up as part of the rising tide of police looking to restrict RTKBA. Would be nice if I am making a false assumption about the VSP.

    I find them honest and neutral about firearms, which is what we should really want. Never has a problem with them, and their web site is fairly accurate. Might ask LEO 229 as he is a class III owner and has had to deal withVSP in more depth about firearms.

    The former superintendent is a real piece of work who showed his true colors during the VT investigation.
    My initial response on reading the commission report was slightly colored by the former superintendent's name. Reading the report, confirmed my initial impression. The guy has a Perfect Fit Last Name*. He's a *********.

    *See http://tinyurl.com/64mclj

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    Skeptic wrote:
    SicSemperTyrannis wrote:
    I agree. The Virginia State Police have awell-known reputation for integrity, honesty and impartiality. They also have been good to gun owners, and have been quickly responsive to our concerns on multiple occasions. What do you have against them, GlennGlocker?
    Are the VSP still good to gun owners?

    I find myself questioning that with the grandstanding positions of the former Superintendent of the State Police on the VT thing, who used to the tragedy to push for gun control totally unrelated to the incident.

    I know he is a FORMER superintendent, but I just chalked it up as part of the rising tide of police looking to restrict RTKBA. Would be nice if I am making a false assumption about the VSP.

    I completely forgot the former superintendent's opinion on the VT report. I guess that answers SicSemperTyrannis' question. As far as LEO229's dealings with them I'm sure they do go well weeing how he's in the club.

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    More stuff coming out about the Fredrick case. Seems his family found bullet holes that were pasted over.

    http://www.wtkr.com/Global/story.asp?S=8513927

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    It just keep getting deeper and deeper........

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    Wow, just wow.

    Here is the article WTKR posted

    Did Police Shoot At Ryan Frederick? His Family Thinks So



    The hands of six Chesapeake detectives present at the botched marijuana raid on Ryan Frederick's house have tested positive for "primer residue," meaning they had traces of chemicals on their hands sometimes left behind when a person fires a gun, according to a lab report filed in court.

    The lab report also said the residue can be left if a person is near weapon as it fires, or if a person handles a weapon with primer residue already on it. Police have insisted no officers fired during the Jan. 17 raid where police went looking for marijuana. Police contend Frederick alone opened fire, with one bullet killing narcotics detective Jarrod Shivers.

    Frederick also had primer residue on both hands, according to the report.

    Police refused to comment on the lab report Tuesday.

    Meanwhile, Frederick's family revealed a bullet hole inside the home they say was caused by police fire. The hole passes through a corner by Frederick's back bedroom. Family members said, and Frederick's attorney confirmed, that police went to the home days after the shooting and plugged the hole with some kind of putty or filler. Defense investigators have pictures of the hole before and after the filler was added, according to attorney James Broccoletti. Police would not comment on that, nor answer any other questions for this story.

    A second lab report shows Frederick's Bersa Firestorm .380 pistol is the gun that fired the fatal bullet, as well as a second bullet found by police. There is no indication in the court file where police found the second bullet. The state crime lab also did some testing on a .223 Remington cartridge found in Frederick's home. However, the lab did not do DNA testing on the cartridge nor is there any indication what kind of weapon fired the round, according to the paperwork. Police search warrants do not show officers located any weapon in Frederick's home capable of firing a .223 round.

    Chesapeake police spokeswoman Christina Golden confirmed some officers are issued Bushmaster M4 Patrol Rifles, which shoot .223-caliber ammunition.

    Frederick is charged with capital murder. Police say he shot Shivers moments after narcotics detectives used a battering ram to knock a hole in Frederick's front door. Police have testified Shivers was standing at the bottom of the home's front steps when the bullet hit him.

    Frederick says he was awakened by a commotion at his front door. He says he believed it was burglars breaking in and he fired to protect himself.

    Police were at Frederick's house looking for what an informant described as a complex marijuana-growing operation in the shed behind his home. Police found only enough marijuana to charge Frederick with a misdemeanor. However, prosecutors later upped the charge to a felony, saying Frederick intended to grow and distribute marijuana.

    Prosecutors have until Friday to decide if they will pursue the death penalty.

    WTKR link to forensic evidence report:

    http://wtkr.images.worldnow.com/imag...g/scan0002.pdf

    edited to add story to my comment


    He wore his gun outside his pants for all the honest world to see. Pancho & Lefty

    The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us....There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! ...The war is inevitableand let it come! I repeat it, Sir, let it come . PATRICK HENRY speech 1776

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    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    This whole situation stinks. I don't know what happened that night but the LEOs side of the tale keeps getting shakier and shakier.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    deepdiver wrote:
    This whole situation stinks. I don't know what happened that night but the LEOs side of the tale keeps getting shakier and shakier.
    You just have to read the last paragraph to understand the situation:

    "Police were at Frederick's house looking for what an informant described as a complex marijuana-growing operation in the shed behind his home. Police found only enough marijuana to charge Frederick with a misdemeanor. However, prosecutors later upped the charge to a felony, saying Frederick intended to grow and distribute marijuana."

    How did Frederick go from being a pot smoker to a cash-crop producer and distributor?

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    "Mystery Bullet"

    WTKR just ran the story tonight 18 June- .223 shell found at Frederick's home was not tested like the .380 shells were tested. No DNA tests, no extractor tests. The lab report indicates that nothing was done to the shell, except to identify it as .223.Police deny that they fired any shots. Too bad the MP4s used by police were not compared to the .223 shell for matching extractor marks and too bad the .223 shell was not tested for DNA

    The station also said the shell casing would play a key role in Frederick's defense. I do not know how accurate this information is, but WTKR has been the most accurate and most complete news source for the home assault incident.
    He wore his gun outside his pants for all the honest world to see. Pancho & Lefty

    The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us....There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! ...The war is inevitableand let it come! I repeat it, Sir, let it come . PATRICK HENRY speech 1776

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    Prosecutor won't seek death penalty for Ryan Frederick

    By John Hopkins
    The Virginian-Pilot
    © June 20, 2008

    CHESAPEAKE

    Special prosecutor Paul Ebert said Thursday that he will not seek the death penalty against Ryan Frederick, the 28-year-old Chesapeake man accused of killing a city detective.

    Frederick is charged with capital murder, use of a firearm during the commission of murder and manufacturing marijuana. He is accused of fatally shooting Detective Jarrod Shivers on the night of Jan. 17 while Shivers and more than a dozen other officers executed a drug search warrant.

    Shivers, a 34-year-old father of three, was standing near Frederick's home in the 900 block of Restart Ave., when he was shot, police said.

    Ebert said his decision was based on Frederick's age and lack of a criminal record. Ebert noted that Shivers was hit by only one shot, which he said would not constitute the "aggravated battery" needed in a death penalty case.

    State law requires a prosecutor to disclose before a trial begins whether he will seek the death penalty against someone charged with capital murder. Ebert informed Chesapeake Circuit Court of his decision during a conference call from Northern Virginia. He also set three tentative dates for motion hearings in the case.

    He said there has been much speculation about the case and that the public will be surprised by the facts when they come out during the trial. Frederick's lawyer, James Broccoletti, could not be reached for comment Thursday evening.

    Ebert, the commonwealth's attorney from Prince William County, was appointed to prosecute the case because local prosecutors had worked closely with Shivers. Chesapeake Commonwealth's Attorney Nancy Parr sought an outside prosecutor to avoid any perceived appearance of conflict or bias by her office.

    Frederick remains in jail without a bond. In a jail interview earlier this year, Frederick said he fired two shots through his door at what he feared were intruders that night.

    The two shots were fired through the front door as officers were using a battering ram on it. One shot from a .380-caliber handgun hit Shivers, an eight-year police veteran.

    After the shooting, police returned with a second search warrant and seized a Bersa "Firestorm" .380-caliber handgun, two .380 bullet casings, one .223-caliber bullet casing, a Samsung TV, a broken wooden door, a pry bar, a battering ram, a shoe and flashlight.

    The .223-caliber shell was entered into the National Integrated Ballistics Information Network and could not be matched, according to lab results. Police have said they did not return fire during the raid.

    John Hopkins, (757) 222-5221, john.hopkins@pilotonline.com


    WTKR (Channel 3) Video:

    http://www.wtkr.com/global/video/fla...p;rnd=89320089


    He wore his gun outside his pants for all the honest world to see. Pancho & Lefty

    The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us....There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! ...The war is inevitableand let it come! I repeat it, Sir, let it come . PATRICK HENRY speech 1776

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    I like this part:




    "He said there has been much speculation about the case and that the public will be surprised by the facts when they come out during the trial."



    Hey Rocky, watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat!

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